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By Alireza Jafarzadeh | April 16, 2012
After a yearlong round of escalating international economic sanctions and rhetoric, the regime in Iran has finally come around to raising expectations that it will take some constructive steps in reining in its nuclear weapons ambitions. But this cycle of threat and accommodation has played out before, and its outcome should have been predictable. According to the information provided by Iranian dissidents obtained from their sources inside the regime, as well as the U.N.'s atomic watchdog agency, the nuclear genie is out of the bottle in Iran, and the regime's genius for delay and subterfuge will only give it the time to complete the dash to a workable weapon.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 8, 2014
As the crystal ball on the 2016 Republican presidential nomination remains cloudy, two-time loser Mitt Romney appears willing at least to entertain the possibility of trying a third time. In addition to occasional comments on matters he knows a lot about, including setting up a health care insurance plan (in Massachusetts) and how to create jobs as well as personal wealth, Mr. Romney has now put on a hat as a defense and foreign policy expert. It's a weapon in his arsenal that he conspicuously lacked in 2012, when he made a mid-campaign trip to Europe and succeeded chiefly ruffling local feathers in Britain, Israel and Poland.
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NEWS
April 7, 2010
President Obama's new policies on nuclear weapons definitely will make us less safe. He just virtually tossed our nuclear deterrence out the window, as he is counting on the so-called good will of our potential enemies. His new strategy renounces the development of any new nuclear weapons and is also overruling his own defense secretary's policy. This faulty strategy is a severe change and shift from those of his predecessors as he seeks to revamp our nations nuclear posture, and this comes in a time in which rogue nations and terrorist organizations like Iran and North Korea have become a greater threat than traditional powers like China and Russia.
NEWS
February 22, 2014
I was in Knoxville, Tenn., recently to support the Transform Now Plowshares activists during their sentencing hearing ("Activists sentenced for weapons site break-in," Feb. 19). Unfortunately, the news brief published in The Sun was just two sentences long. The note did not even list the names of the members of the disarmament group: Sister Megan Rice, Greg Boertje-Obed and Michael Walli. Mr. Boertje-Obed lived for many years at Baltimore's Jonah House, and the other two visited the community on several occasions.
NEWS
By Alistair Millar and Brian Alexander | May 17, 2001
WASHINGTON -- The Cold War ended more than a decade ago, yet U.S. nuclear doctrine and targeting plans still call for thousands of nuclear warheads poised to launch at a moment's notice. The Bush administration is conducting a congressionally mandated review of U.S. nuclear posture and is studying possible deployment and eventual use of low-yield nuclear weapons. The latter study would require abandoning a provision in the fiscal year 1994 defense authorization bill prohibiting nuclear laboratories from research and development that could lead to a low-yield nuclear weapon.
NEWS
By JACK MENDELSOHN | May 17, 1992
The agenda for this week's visit to Washington by Kazakhstan's President, Nursultan Nazarbayev -- as well as the one put forward earlier this month when Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk was in town -- includes a crucial national security issue.After months of trying to pin down the two leaders on the future of the nuclear weapons left behind in their countries by the former Soviet Union, the United States finally persuaded Mr. Kravchuk, and very likely will succeed in convincing Mr. Nazarbayev this Tuesday, to make three very important commitments:* To renounce nuclear weapons and to join the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT)
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 17, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Nearly a half-century after a secret atomic experiment led to the development of a mammoth government nuclear weapons industry, the Bush administration announced plans yesterday to slash the complex to four production plants in the South and Midwest and a test site in Nevada.The new configuration means that an enterprise that once produced 5,000 to 6,000 nuclear warheads a year will, by 1996, be mainly responsible for maintaining the shrinking stockpiles and cleaning up the pollution it produced, Energy Secretary James D. Watkins said.
NEWS
By Gwen Dubois and Cindy Parker | August 6, 2002
FROM THE nuclear bombing of Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, to our current "war," the enemy has changed from the Japanese to the Russians to Muslim terrorists, but the solution always seems to involve nuclear weapons. As long as there are terrorists and unstable or foolish leaders, there can be no safety in these weapons. As physicians, we are concerned about the health and safety of our patients, our communities and all the residents of this world. The sacrifice to public health is too great, the scale of civilian suffering and deaths too large, and the environmental contamination too long-lasting to ever justify using a nuclear weapon again.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 13, 1991
2/3 TC LONDON -- The North Atlantic Treaty Organization has decided that all of its tactical nuclear weapons will be removed from Europe.Formal ratification of the decision may be announced as early as November, when the 16 NATO defense ministers are to meet in Rome, Secretary-General Manfred Woerner said yesterday in Bonn, Germany.NATO officials in Brussels, Belgium, disclosed that eliminating the battlefield nuclear arms would be part of the alliance's revised doctrine. The doctrine has been undergoing change since the disappearance of the Warsaw Pact and is being further revised because of the upheaval in the Soviet Union.
NEWS
By George Lee Butler | February 4, 1997
WELL MEANING friends have counseled me that by championing elimination of nuclear weapons I risk setting the bar too high, providing an easy target for the cynical and diverting attention from the more immediately achievable.The harsh truth is that six years after the end of the Cold War we are still prisoner to its psychology of distrust, still enmeshed in the vocabulary of ''mutual assured destruction,'' still in the thrall of the nuclear era. Worse, strategists persist in conjuring worlds that spiral toward chaos, and concocting threats that they assert can only be discouraged or expunged by the existence or employment of nuclear weapons.
NEWS
By Victor Davis Hanson | December 29, 2013
The gangster state of North Korea became a nuclear power in 2006-2007, despite lots of foreign aid aimed at precluding just such proliferation -- help usually not otherwise accorded such a loony dictatorship. Apparently the civilized world rightly suspected that if nuclear, Pyongyang would either export nuclear material and expertise to other unstable countries, or bully its successful but non-nuclear neighbors -- or both. The United States has given billions of dollars in foreign aid to Pakistan, whose Islamist gangs have spearheaded radical anti-American terrorism.
NEWS
By Robert C. Koehler | December 15, 2013
Iran! So long our enemy-in-waiting, it's just asking for it, y'know? No wonder Americans are confused about the idea of maybe not going to war with that country one of these days, at least according to USA Today, which reported: "The White House and Ira nface an uphill selling job to convince Americans to embrace the interim nuclear pact negotiated with Tehran last month. " Two out of three Americans who have actually heard something about the accord don't trust it, the paper explains, because, in essence, Iran took American hostages that one time (for no reason)
NEWS
November 25, 2013
Since the Iran nuclear deal was announced late Saturday, the criticism has been predictable. Israel's leadership isn't happy; neither is Saudi Arabia's. And there's a customary skepticism in Congress, particularly from Republicans, the most outlandish of whom see it as part of a grand scheme to keep their attacks on Obamacare off the front page. But at its heart, the accord is historic not because it ensures Iran won't develop nuclear weapons but because it starts a process by which that goal might be accomplished.
NEWS
October 7, 2013
President Barack Obama's critics lost no time in calling him naive for welcoming talks offered by Iran's president aimed at reducing tensions between their two countries over Tehran's disputed nuclear program. Israeli President Benjamin Netanyahu was outspoken in his disdain for the diplomatic initiative launched at the United Nations last month by Iranian President Hasan Rowhani, calling him a wolf in sheep's clothing who only wants to bargain in order to buy more time for Iran to build a bomb.
NEWS
June 17, 2013
Reader Nelson Marans' recent letter about President Obama's foreign policy contains numerous misstatements ("Ehrlich is right; Obama's foreign policy a shambles," June 12). First, the Egyptian people overthrew a corrupt and incompetent government. The U.S. had nothing to do with it. Second, Syria is involved in a civil war that has nothing to do with the U.S. We are correct to stay out of it. Third, there is no evidence that Iran, a country that does not threaten U.S. national interests, has either nuclear weapons or a weapons program.
NEWS
June 17, 2013
The strong showing by the most moderate of the six presidential candidates who were allowed to run in Iran's national elections last week is a sign that the Iranian people — if not the conservative clerics who have final say on policy matters — are ready for a change. The Obama administration should seize the opportunity and attempt to reopen talks with the new president-elect in order to seriously explore whether he can move his country toward resolving the issues surrounding Iran's nuclear program in a way that leads to better relations with the West.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | January 8, 2008
Ever since 9/11, the nightmare scenario for American security has been the possibility that terrorists could obtain nuclear weapons. I've just come back from the place where, in theory, that might happen: Pakistan, a country that is thought to have about 50 nuclear warheads, where al-Qaida, the Taliban and other jihadis have established a substantial foothold. The assassination of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto and the continuing instability in her country force us to ask a terrifying question: Could Pakistan's Islamic extremists seize a nuke or steal the fissile material for a dirty bomb?
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 12, 1992
BRUSSELS, Belgium -- Russia challenged the United States yesterday to agree to faster cuts in long-range nuclear weapons in time for the June summit between President Bush and Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin.After almost five hours of negotiations on the two competing arms reduction proposals, Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Russian Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev said they had made progress but still disagreed on several key issues.Mr. Bush and Mr. Yeltsin have both proposed large-scale cuts in their nuclear arsenals, but they differ on what missiles should be cut and how fast.
NEWS
February 22, 2013
The Sun observed in a recent editorial that President Barack Obama's call to reduce the threat of nuclear war "could not have been more timely" ("Avoiding Armageddon," Feb. 18). It would be impossible to agree more with that sentiment. Since the Cold War, the proliferation or threat of proliferation of nuclear weapons to rogue states and terrorist organizations has been a continuous specter in international relations. With Iranian talks next week and a North Korean nuclear test last week, the threat of nuclear-armed rogue nations has never been higher.
NEWS
February 21, 2013
The recent editorial on arms control ("Avoiding Armageddon," Feb. 18) was exactly on point. More than two decades have passed since the fall of the Berlin Wall, and U.S. national security strategy has changed drastically. Yet many in Congress still refuse to heed the growing bipartisan chorus of former government officials and military leaders who argue that our current arsenal of approximately 5,000 nuclear weapons greatly exceeds U.S. security needs. Our government plans to spend approximately $640 billion on nuclear weapons and related programs over the next decade.
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