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NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | February 19, 2004
WASHINGTON - Government inspectors went to the Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant this week to examine a cooling system malfunction that caused the Unit 2 nuclear reactor to shut down briefly Jan. 23. But plant and Calvert County officials said there was no cause for alarm in the shutdown and the inspection, which will last for a week, is routine. "There was no threat to surrounding areas, and there were no public health and safety consequences," said Neil A. Sheehan, a spokesman for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which dispatched inspectors to the Lusby plant Tuesday.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2003
In a move to expand its power-generating business, Constellation Energy Group said yesterday that it has agreed to acquire a nuclear power plant from Rochester Gas & Electric Corp. for $401 million. The R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant northeast of Rochester, N.Y., would be Constellation's third nuclear plant and fit its strategy of generating and selling power nationwide, company officials said yesterday. Mayo A. Shattuck III, Constellation's chairman, president and chief executive officer, called the Ginna plant "one of the jewels of the U.S. nuclear industry.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 24, 2003
TORONTO - A document filed at a detention hearing last week for 19 Pakistani-born students and other immigrants detained by Canadian security officials for possible ties to terrorism noted a "pattern of fraudulent document use to obtain or maintain immigrant status." The men were detained Aug. 14 after an investigation found that one was taking flying lessons at a school near an Ontario nuclear power plant. They range in age from 18 to 33. Government officials said there was little they could disclose about the investigation, but the four-page document drew a picture of a mysterious group that lived in spare apartments with only computers and mattresses on their floors.
BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 22, 2003
Four hundred workers on the banks of Chesapeake Bay at Cove Point were laboring furiously in the rain last week, pouring concrete, laying fiber optics and welding steel to renovate a liquefied natural gas terminal mothballed since 1980. There was little time to spare. The first tanker loaded with the liquid form of natural gas, called LNG, is expected at the Calvert County terminal at the end of July. It will pull up to Cove Point's pier a mile offshore and pump millions of gallons of the frigid fuel through submerged insulated steel pipes and into four giant storage tanks on land.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2003
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has renewed the operating license of the Peach Bottom nuclear power plant for another 20 years. The power plant is operated by Exelon Generation Co. and is just across the Pennsylvania border from Cardiff. Its license approval comes after the plant received high marks for safety in its annual assessment by federal regulators earlier this year. "They operated in a manner that protected the health and public safety" of the people living near the plant last year, Mohamed Shanbaky, an official with the NRC, told residents attending the plant's annual safety inspection meeting in March.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 13, 2003
TOKYO - Judging by the warnings of the electricity company here in the world's largest city, this will be a summer unlike all others, with severe power shortages and blackouts predicted. Industry officials hedge these alarming forecasts with one big "if." The Tokyo Electric Power Co., or Tepco, says it will be able to keep its customers' tempers from boiling over only if it is allowed to press 16 nuclear power plants back into operation. The plants were temporarily taken out of service last year after a scandal over falsified inspections and poor maintenance.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2003
The Peach Bottom nuclear power plant, just across the Pennsylvania border from Cardiff, has been awarded high marks for safety in its annual assessment by federal regulators. "They operated in a manner that protected the health and public safety" of the people living near the plant last year, said Mohamed Shanbaky, an official with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. He was speaking to a small gathering at the NRC's annual safety performance review meeting Wednesday evening at the Peach Bottom Inn in Delta, Pa. Shanbaky is branch chief of the NRC's office in King of Prussia, Pa., which has primary responsibility for annual safety inspections of the Peach Bottom plant.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 10, 2003
WASHINGTON - Charging that the Bush administration has not done enough to protect U.S. nuclear power plants, several Democratic senators proposed legislation yesterday to bolster security at the reactors. Their action came amid reports of a survey showing that a third of the employees at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) doubt their agency's commitment to safety. Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, in announcing the measure at a Capitol Hill news conference, said, "Last year, we did not do enough to improve security at our nuclear power plants, and it is a glaring weakness in our homeland defense."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 24, 2002
WASHINGTON - North Korea started to reopen a sealed plutonium reprocessing plant yesterday, the most provocative and technically important step it has taken in recent days to revive a nuclear program that experts said could produce weapons within months. The International Atomic Energy Agency said North Korean officials had disabled surveillance cameras and broken through seals barring entry to a building housing the equipment needed to turn spent fuel rods from a nearby reactor into weapons-grade material.
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