Advertisement
HomeCollectionsNuclear Plant
IN THE NEWS

Nuclear Plant

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
Jay Hancock | September 6, 2011
Don't worry, the folks who operate nuclear power plants near Baltimore told us after a Japanese earthquake caused meltdowns and large radioactivity releases there. We don't have severe earthquakes on the East Coast. That proposition got tested Aug. 23, when the 5.8-magnitude quake centered in Virginia rattled buildings as far north as Toronto. The closest nuclear plant to Baltimore is Exelon Corp.'s Peach Bottom facility on the Susquehanna River, 45 miles away. Peach Bottom is built to withstand ground movement equal to an earthquake registering 6.1 on the Richter scale, Exelon said in April, after the Japan catastrophe.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
Federal inspectors found no violations as they delved into the reactor shutdowns in January at Calvert Cliffs in Southern Maryland, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission said Friday. An electrical malfunction caused both of the nuclear power plant's reactors to shut down during a snow and ice storm in January, sending natural gas prices soaring as energy providers rushed to make up for the lost electricity production. The commission sent a three-person special inspection team to the plant the following week.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 6, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Recent reports by defecting workers at a nuclear power plant under construction in Cuba were the "first real indication" of potential safety problems, a Bush administration official told members of Congress yesterday.Michael Kozak, a deputy assistant secretary of state, told members of the House Foreign Affairs subcommittee on inter-American affairs that the examples cited by the defectors of serious flaws at the nuclear plant are cause for concern, but not for panic.Kozak said that the administration intends to contact the government of Fidel Castro about the safety of the Soviet-designed reactor.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission announced Monday that it is conducting a special inspection at the Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant in Southern Maryland after an electrical malfunction caused the two reactors there to shut down. The plant, which restarted both reactors over the weekend, suffered the shutdown after snow and ice during a storm Jan. 21 apparently affected a ventilation louver filter and caused a short circuit. After the electrical supply system shut down, so did several plant systems and components that rely on electricity, the nuclear regulatory agency said Monday.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | October 20, 1991
In the past year, S3 Technologies of Columbia has created 50 new jobs feeding on an industry that isn't growing at all in the United States: nuclear power.S3, which manufactures simulated nuclear power plant control rooms, was among seven companies recognized by the Greater Baltimore Committee with its 1991 Venture Awards Thursday for helping strengthen the local economy by investing in new jobs and equipment.Although the $50 million-a-year company has yet to gain the name recognition of county-based companies like the Rouse Co. or the Ryland Group, it has grown enough in three years to make it one of the county's largest employers with a staff of 440. The company opened in Howard in 1982 with less than 50 employees.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2002
The federal government is about to provide 80,000 Marylanders who live near nuclear power plants with free doses of a common over-the-counter medicine that can protect people who survive high doses of radiation from developing thyroid cancer years later. The potassium iodide pills are courtesy of the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which in December offered to give any state that asked for them enough doses for everyone living within 10 miles of a nuclear plant. The offer, made weeks before the NRC warned nuclear plant operators of possible terrorist attacks, is meant as a supplement to evacuation plans.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | September 30, 1992
HARRISBURG, Pa. -- It's as if the lion and the lamb decided to be friends.After 13 years of fears, distrust and bitter litigation, the operator of the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant and one of its harshest critics agreed yesterday to work together.In a landmark settlement, TMI's operator, GPU Nuclear Corp., said it would give residents near the facility the tools they need to independently monitor the site's radiation. Overseeing the effort will be Eric Epstein, a spokesman for Three Mile Island Alert, an anti-nuclear group that has been the utility's most tenacious opponent.
BUSINESS
By Kevin McQuaid and Kevin McQuaid,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1998
SOLOMONS -- Federal regulators kicked off public hearings yesterday on Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s plan to extend the license on its Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, amid protests from environmentalists and residents.The Maryland chapter of the Sierra Club and other groups opposed to BGE's proposal contended that the plant in Lusby poses potential environmental and safety problems and should be forced to shut down when its license to operate expires early in the next century."What we have here is an aging plant, and with it the increased likelihood that an accident will occur that should concern all Marylanders," said Glen Besa, a Sierra Club regional representative.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | January 2, 2000
Even as Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. seeks to become the nation's first electric utility to re-license its nuclear power plant, its parent is targeting the controversial energy source as a key component of its post-deregulation business strategy to become a major power provider. To kick off the strategy, Constellation Energy Group plans to acquire additional reactors to expand its nuclear portfolio beyond Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant and create economies of scale. Constellation wants to take advantage of bargain prices for nuclear plants as other utilities, which have chosen to focus on transmission rather than power generation, put theirs up for sale, company officials said.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1998
In a petition filed with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, a national watchdog group is seeking to block renewal of an operating license for Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant.The Lusby plant, which is operated by Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., in April became the first nuclear plant in the country to apply for renewal of its 40-year license. Any potential challenges might set precedents, and all aspects of the process are being closely watched in the industry.Under an order signed by the NRC yesterday, a panel must decide within 90 days whether the National Whistleblower Center, which filed its petition Aug. 7, qualifies to intervene in the renewal.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 18, 2013
A new government report raises questions about the consistency of federal nuclear power plant oversight, noting regional disparities in the frequency with which plants - including Maryland's Calvert Cliffs - have been cited for safety problems or violations. The review released this week by the Government Accountability Office , an investigative arm of Congress, found significant differences across the country in how often the Nuclear Regulatory Commission reported finding low-risk safety problems and low-level violations at the nation's 62 operating nuclear plants.  While there were not similar regional disparities in the number of serious violations reported, the differences in identifying minor problems could affect the NRC's ability to head off safety lapses before they get worse.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 6, 2013
The operators of Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant in southern Maryland shut down one of its two reactors Thursday after a control rod assembly malfunctioned during testing, federal safety regulators announced. The shutdown occurred without complications and did not pose any risks for the public or plant staff, Nuclear Regulatory Commission spokesman Neil Sheehan said. Unit 2 was powered down around 5 p.m. Thursday after operators checking a control rod "received some indication that electrical maintenance was needed on one of the assemblies," said Kory Raftery, plant spokesman.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2013
French energy firm Electricite de France outlined an exit strategy Tuesday from its stake in three of Exelon's nuclear power plants, including Calvert Cliffs in Southern Maryland. Both companies disclosed that EDF has an option to sell its 49.99 percent stake in Constellation Energy Nuclear Group to Exelon - which owns the rest - for fair market value between 2016 and 2022. Constellation, bought by Exelon last year, also worked out a deal with EDF to transfer the power plants' licenses to its parent.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
Regulators said Monday that they will hear about the performance of Constellation Energy Nuclear Group power plants next week - including Calvert Cliffs in Southern Maryland - in a public meeting in Baltimore. Officials from Exelon-owned Constellation are scheduled to talk to Nuclear Regulatory Commission staffers about activities and licensing actions regarding its nuclear plants. The meeting is to begin 8 a.m. Monday at the Royal Sonesta Harbor Court Baltimore hotel, 550 Light St. A part of the meeting will be behind closed doors, as officials discuss security issues, but the rest will be open to the public, the regulators said.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
A new report suggests that a substantial number of U.S. nuclear reactors — including one or both at Calvert Cliffs in Southern Maryland — are at risk of early retirement. Mark Cooper with the Vermont Law School's Institute for Energy and the Environment said a third of the country's nuclear fleet have a number of risk factors, largely economic, that could lead to their owners' deciding to shut them down before their licenses expire. A single problem, such as a costly repair, could be enough to push any of the reactors over the brink, he said.
BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2013
Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant in southern Maryland restarted one of its two reactors Thursday after fixing the mechanical problem that caused its shutdown two days earlier, a Constellation spokesman said. Unit 2 reconnected to the regional electric grid at 8:50 a.m. after workers fixed a faulty coupling on a pump feeding water into one of two steam generators at the plant, said Kory Raftery, spokesman for Constellation Energy Nuclear Group. Operators shut the reactor down Tuesday morning after vibrations caused the pump to stop operating, Raftery said.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2003
In a move to expand its power-generating business, Constellation Energy Group said yesterday that it has agreed to acquire a nuclear power plant from Rochester Gas & Electric Corp. for $401 million. The R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant northeast of Rochester, N.Y., would be Constellation's third nuclear plant and fit its strategy of generating and selling power nationwide, company officials said yesterday. Mayo A. Shattuck III, Constellation's chairman, president and chief executive officer, called the Ginna plant "one of the jewels of the U.S. nuclear industry.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | September 29, 2007
On tree-lined bluffs overlooking the Chesapeake Bay, where anti-nuclear activists won a landmark environmental victory 36 years ago, Constellation Energy Group Inc. is engineering atomic power's comeback. This time, even if there are protests, bulldozers will roll. That's because the Baltimore company and its allies have found a way around a long-standing regulatory policy they say added a year or more to construction times for nuclear plants. In April, the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission agreed to industry demands that it reduce its oversight of initial work at reactor sites.
NEWS
February 6, 2013
Norman Meadow's commentary promoting nuclear power over wind energy as a solution to climate change leaves out serious unsolved problems that wind does not present ("Nuclear blows away wind," Feb. 1). Huge piles of highly radioactive waste are sitting all over the world in vulnerable spent fuel pools lacking containment structures or backup generators. The Japanese government was considering an evacuation of Tokyo in the event of an explosion at one. As we expand our reliance on nuclear power, we also expand this Achilles heel of the nuclear industry.
BUSINESS
Jay Hancock | September 6, 2011
Don't worry, the folks who operate nuclear power plants near Baltimore told us after a Japanese earthquake caused meltdowns and large radioactivity releases there. We don't have severe earthquakes on the East Coast. That proposition got tested Aug. 23, when the 5.8-magnitude quake centered in Virginia rattled buildings as far north as Toronto. The closest nuclear plant to Baltimore is Exelon Corp.'s Peach Bottom facility on the Susquehanna River, 45 miles away. Peach Bottom is built to withstand ground movement equal to an earthquake registering 6.1 on the Richter scale, Exelon said in April, after the Japan catastrophe.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.