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By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1998
The main thing Crystal McCrary and Rita Ewing want you to know is they did not write their autobiographies.They wrote fiction, get it? Fiction. So what if "Homecourt Advantage" (Avon Books, 1998), reads like a juicy tell-all, inside look at the National Basketball Association?So what if McCrary is the wife of Greg Anthony, a Seattle Supersonics player? And Ewing is married to Patrick Ewing of the New York Knicks?The Ewings are a superstar basketball couple going through their own personal drama.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
Word from Hollywood is that former Baltimore Sun and Washington Post movie critic Stephen Hunter's 1995 novel, "Dirty White Boys," will be the next project for David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, the pair behind HBO's hugely successful "Game of Thrones. " Deadline: Hollywood reports that Benioff and Weiss have made a deal with Fox to write, direct and produce the movie adaptation of Hunter's novel, the story of a trio of violent prison escapees, led by the anti-heroic Lamar Pye, being pursued by a dogged state trooper.
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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
One of the most widely read young authors of the year is shopping for a book deal. Rebecca Martinson, whose furious email to her sorority sisters at University of Maryland became a national sensation, has teamed up with the creators of White Girl Problems to write a novel, the New Republic reports. Martinson has not responded to a request for comment, and we don't know the subject of her novel. But, if Martinson follows her creative writing teacher's advice and writes about what she knows, we can imagine the novel would be about anger, sorority politics, pleasing frat boys, and people who should punch themselves in the face (which, apparently, was most members of her former sorority)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
The author Mohsin Hamid has a home in Pakistan and spent nearly two decades studying and working in the United States. He's 42 now, and he thinks of himself as living almost "between" countries. "I've lived half my life in America and Europe, and half my life in Pakistan," Hamid says over the phone. He's coming to Baltimore this week, where he will read from his third novel, "How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia. " "But I also live between generations, and I live between social classes with different political points of view.
EXPLORE
October 6, 2011
M.T. Smith, of Randallstown, recently released a book, "A Familiar Murder," on Amazon.com. The murder mystery takes the reader through Baltimore neighborhoods while solving a crime being perpetrated on the elderly. Smith is a former creative director for Guild Communications Inc, a community relations firm in Greenbelt. McDonogh School Director of Aquatics Scott Ward, of Owings Mills, has been named the recipient of the Thomas R. Harper Endowed Teaching Chair. This award was established in 2001 by alumnus Bob Chilstrom to honor his 1963 classmate, Tom Harper, who retired in 2004 after teaching English at McDonogh School for 36 years.The Harper Chair recognizes outstanding service to the school by a faculty or staff member.
NEWS
October 23, 2013
One of the most widely read young authors of the year is shopping for a book deal. Rebecca Martinson, whose furious email to her sorority sisters at University of Maryland became a national sensation, has teamed with the creators of White Girl Problems to write a novel, the New Republic reports. Martinson has not responded to a request for comment, and we don't know the subject of her novel. But, if Martinson follows her creative writing teacher's advice and writes about what she knows, we can imagine the novel would be about anger, sorority politics, pleasing frat boys, and people who should punch themselves in the face (which, apparently, were most members of her former sorority)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
Because the Baltimore-area novelist Alice McDermott possesses a painterly eye that delights in the way things look and sound and smell and taste, it can be easy to miss her underlying focus. For the National Book Award-winning author, each small sensory jolt that originates in this world is a gateway to a more incorporeal realm. "Marie takes a spiritual journey in this novel," McDermott says of the heroine of her newly released book, "Someone: A Novel. " "She goes from not understanding at all to not quite understanding to understanding a little bit. Early in the book, her brother makes an absolutely outrageous proposition from the Gospel of Matthew, that all the hairs on our heads are counted and that we're not alone.
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Susan Reimer | May 6, 2013
When it comes to books, I guess you could call me a voracious listener. I have been commuting about an hour to and from work for more than 30 years, and during that time I bet I've listened to a couple of thousand books. First on tape, now on compact discs. If you had to sit in traffic that long every day - and it is worst on a Friday in summer, when everyone is trying to cross the Bay Bridge - you'd listen to anything that might distract you, too. And I have delved into a wide range of titles, from history to historical fiction to murder mysteries to true crime.
NEWS
By Dave Rosenthal | February 23, 2012
J.K. Rowling, who created the fabulously successful Harry Potter series of book -- and movies -- will publish her first adult novel, Little, Brown and Co. announced today. The title, date for  worldwide publication and further details about the novel will be announced later in the year, the publisher said. Rowling's website simply shows an enticing, mysterious, yellow book entitled "The New Book. " Clever, that. Rowling said in statement via the publisher, “Although I've enjoyed writing it every bit as much, my next book will be very different to the Harry Potter series ... . The freedom to explore new territory is a gift that Harry's success has brought me, and with that new territory it seemed a logical progression to have a new publisher.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2011
Twelve -year-old Connor Sullivan has anger-management problems. How he grapples with his temper drives the plot of "Hothead," an entertaining first young-adult novel by legendary Orioles infielder and Hall-of-Famer Cal Ripken Jr. and Baltimore Sun columnist Kevin Cowherd . With its conflict-driven plot, the story is a page-turner. Add concrete details and strong verbs (Cowherd's signature touch), and the story will engage even kids who might have more interest in baseball than in reading.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
Getting out of the local cultural mainstream, I recently took in the premiere of "Where the Whangdoodle Sings" by Generous Company at Theatre Project and the first staged presentation of "Red Giant" by Rhymes With Opera at the Windup Space. "Whangdoodle," a play by K. Frithjof Peterson, struck me as a rather forced fantasy, centering around a haunted tattoo artist named Voula and her equally haunted client, Benj, a stained glass window maker. The script combines a whole lot of issues -- myth, baseball (Hank Aaron's career gets particular emphasis)
NEWS
January 11, 2014
If you think present-day Baltimore has problems, travel a few centuries into the future and check out B-Mor, author Chang-Rae Lee's even more dystopian imagining of our city. In Lee's new novel, "On Such a Full Sea," the city's current crop of residents have long since died out or moved on, leaving blocks of vacant homes with murals of sky painted on boarded-up windows. Immigrants from "New China" then settled the city, renaming North Milton Avenue "Longevity Way," revitalizing blocks of vacant rowhouses, clearing the "huge city cemetery," planting "grow beds" and constructing massive fish tanks.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | November 7, 2013
A few weeks back, when Congress came to an agreement on budgetary issues as the national government inched ever closer to the prospect of a large scale default for the first time since the Articles of Confederation government, the deal was characterized as one reached at the 11th hour. Reaching a deal at the last-minute has come to be known as an 11th hour agreement, a turn of phrase that, like many, has its roots in military history. It is common to refer to a certain kind of no-win situation, especially one with an ironic twist, as a Catch-22.
NEWS
October 23, 2013
One of the most widely read young authors of the year is shopping for a book deal. Rebecca Martinson, whose furious email to her sorority sisters at University of Maryland became a national sensation, has teamed with the creators of White Girl Problems to write a novel, the New Republic reports. Martinson has not responded to a request for comment, and we don't know the subject of her novel. But, if Martinson follows her creative writing teacher's advice and writes about what she knows, we can imagine the novel would be about anger, sorority politics, pleasing frat boys, and people who should punch themselves in the face (which, apparently, were most members of her former sorority)
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
One of the most widely read young authors of the year is shopping for a book deal. Rebecca Martinson, whose furious email to her sorority sisters at University of Maryland became a national sensation, has teamed up with the creators of White Girl Problems to write a novel, the New Republic reports. Martinson has not responded to a request for comment, and we don't know the subject of her novel. But, if Martinson follows her creative writing teacher's advice and writes about what she knows, we can imagine the novel would be about anger, sorority politics, pleasing frat boys, and people who should punch themselves in the face (which, apparently, was most members of her former sorority)
NEWS
October 17, 2013
Author Erika Robuck, author of "Receive Me Falling," "Hemingway's Girl" and most recently "Call Me Zelda," will speak at the Abingdon library at 2 p.m. Sunday. Growing up in historic Annapolis, Robuck was surrounded by history. Her first novel, "Receive Me Falling," set in the Caribbean, focuses on a woman exploring her family's past. Unable to find an interested agent, Robuck self-published this novel and did her own promotion. With her second novel, "Hemingway's Girls," she attended a pitch-fest at a writer's conference and after three short minutes of "selling" her story to six agents in hopes of finding representation, she received six offers.
FEATURES
By Cox Newspapers | May 17, 2001
ATLANTA - Several news organizations have jumped into the fight over whether the protectors of "Gone With the Wind" can block the publication of the new novel "The Wind Done Gone." CNN, Cox Enterprises and the Tribune Company, which owns the Chicago Tribune and The Sun, said in "friend of the court" briefs that they "are extremely concerned about the implications of a federal court issuing a preliminary injunction blocking publication of a potentially significant work of fiction that comments on the evils of slavery."
FEATURES
By Nancy Pate | October 30, 1994
Although Anne Rice is the most famous of contemporary vampire novelists, she is by no means the only one.Several hundred vampire novels have been published in the past 25 years, with writers such as Chelsea Yarbro, Fred Saberhagen, P. N. Elrod, Tanith Lee, Lori Herter and Elaine Bergstrom turning out multiple tales. Horrormeisters Stephen King, Peter Straub and Clive Barker have all tried their hand at fictional vampires.Here's a look at some of the latest offerings in the genre:* "The Secret Life of Laszlo, Count Dracula," by Roderick Anscombe (Hyperion, $22.95)
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By Dave Rosenthal and The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
The Man Booker Prize was awarded to 28-year-old New Zealander Eleanor Catton for her novel "The Luminaries. " Catton's novel -- only her second -- beat works from literary heavyweights such as Colm Tóibín (" The Testament of Mary ") and Jhumpa Lahiri ("The Lowland") for a prize of 50,000 pounds -- about $80,000. Here is a description of "The Luminaries" from Man Booker: Walter Moody has come to make his fortune upon the New Zealand goldfields.  On arrival, he stumbles across a tense gathering of twelve local men, who have met in secret to discuss a series of unsolved crimes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Vaddey Ratner didn't expect much when she first took on the project of writing a novel about a young Cambodian girl and her family who are forced into the countryside by the Khmer Rouge as part of the communist group's program of genocide that began in 1975. It was just something that she needed to do. "I sat down to write as an act of mourning the ghosts and spirits, honoring those lost lives," she explains. "In the Shadow of the Banyan," Ratner's first novel, is based on her experiences as a child.
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