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By ERIC R. DANTON and ERIC R. DANTON,HARTFORD COURANT | December 18, 2005
For a long time after the death of her son, Voletta Wallace lost her identity. "I didn't even know if I had a name," she says. "I was just Biggie's mom." Biggie, of course, was Notorious B.I.G., the iconic rapper killed in Los Angeles in a 1997 shooting incident that has never been solved. Now, more than eight years later, Wallace has reclaimed herself with a book, Biggie: Voletta Wallace Remembers Her Son, Christopher Wallace, aka Notorious B.I.G., and a promotional tour for a new album of duets featuring Biggie juxtaposed with a slew of the rap world's biggest stars.
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FEATURES
By Dan DeLuca and Dan DeLuca,Knight-Ridder | January 10, 1992
She really does love rock 'n' roll.Talk to Joan Jett on the telephone and you can't miss it. It's the voice of a fan.She's going on about the young bands she's been listening to: "I'm a huge fan of the Replacements. I really like Jane's Addiction, but now they broke up. I like the Nirvana record, but everybody seems to like that. And I just got turned on to this band Fugazi from D.C. They're a great band."Then there are the bands that lit her rock fire: "I think the first single I ever bought was 'All Right Now' [a 1970 hit by British hard-rock group Free]
FEATURES
By Cheryl Johnston and Cheryl Johnston,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2003
Cheaters never prosper, the old adage goes. But Winona Ryder, Stephen Glass and Jayson Blair might beg to differ. All three can tell you that sometimes crime pays. After appearing in court dressed in fashion label Marc Jacobs' clothes to face charges of shoplifting a Marc Jacobs top, among other items, Ryder has now modeled for the designer. Stephen Glass, a former writer for The New Republic, Rolling Stone, Harper's and George magazines, was discovered in 1998 to be fabricating his articles.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 1, 2003
The best discoveries in the Maryland Film Festival aren't to be found only among its multitude of documentaries and contemporary features. They also come in deceptively familiar territory, when the festival showcases movie classics in prime venues like the Senator and the big theater at the Charles. At these events, you realize that watching classics on TV, you can barely appreciate what's great about them. Seeing a movie like Barry Levinson's choice for the opening-night attraction, On The Waterfront, in a theater as pristine as the Senator demonstrates how overpowering a square-shaped, black-and-white frame can be when the picture is projected theatrically - and when the content acts as a giant emotional magnet.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | October 4, 1997
Day 2 of AMC's fifth annual Film Preservation Festival devotes itself to the films of Alfred Hitchcock, so you know plenty of good stuff is in store.The day's highlight is the TV debut of the restored version of "Vertigo" (8 p.m.-10: 15 p.m.), with James Stewart as a police investigator obsessed with a woman he's been asked to investigate. Kim Novak plays the mysterious woman he loses and then finds? The film is a masterpiece, and the $1 million restoration was worth every penny, restoring both the film's vivid colors and its wide-screen glory.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | May 12, 1995
"You mongrel Slavic swine," the cramped scribbling on the postcard began. "When are you going to apologize for wrongly blaming the Muslim world for the Oklahoma bombing? If the world ever goes to war, it will be because of pigs like you. I hope that you . . ."I couldn't make out what he hoped but I assume it wasn't pleasant. And his name appeared to be something like GlshF8rgh, but I can't be sure. That's usually the way it is with the names of those who use "mongrel Slavic swine" as a salutation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2003
I was a freshman in college when this spicy Brooklyn chick named Lil' Kim stormed onto the hip-hop horizon. At every campus party that year -- 1996 -- folks packed the dance floor when the DJ threw on "No Time," her sassy, James Brown funk-flavored hit. Her flow was decidedly masculine, the lyrical content raw and pornographic. She punctuated the lazy groove with rhymes that were clever and funny, but too nasty to reprint in a family newspaper. The promotional shots for her classic debut, Hard Core, featured the honey-toned Tabasco-tongued rapper squatting in a bikini and heels.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Ollove | August 29, 2004
Public Enemies: America's Greatest Crime Wave and the Birth of the FBI, 1933-34 by Bryan Burrough, Penguin Press, 570 pages, $27.95. What an electrifying moment it must have been when Bryan Burrough made the discovery that was the genesis for this ceaselessly exciting book. During one two-year period, some of the most notorious -- and most colorfully named -- criminals in American history were all on the loose, creating havoc and diversion in a Depression-addled nation. Baby Face Nelson (a psychopath)
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 26, 2002
WASHINGTON -- It's hard to be a Catholic sometimes, and I don't mean hauling myself out of bed at 6:30 on a Sunday morning to catch the early Mass so I can have the rest of the day free. What's hard is trying to understand the mindset that prevents the church hierarchy from coming up with immediate, common-sense solutions to something like the current scandal of child sexual abuse by priests that sent the American cardinals scurrying off to Rome. It's commendable that Pope John Paul II summoned the cardinals to address this most serious matter.
NEWS
October 15, 2007
The proliferation of gangs in American cities has led to calls for new federal laws and tougher penalties to stem gang violence. Locking up more gang members may deplete their ranks, but only until the next teenager becomes the newest recruit. It's the wrong approach to the real solution, which is keeping youngsters from joining a gang in the first place. We question the need for new laws because there are few crimes unique to gangs. Their members - no matter their colors - murder, steal, sell drugs, extort money, beat up rivals and intimidate witnesses.
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