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NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | May 16, 1991
Ottawa. -- In the summer of 1831, when Alexis de Tocqueville was making the journey which produced his great book on American democracy, he visited French Canada, the experience producing in him the sober conclusion '' . . . that the greatest and most irremediable calamity that a people can suffer is to be conquered.''Leaving Canada to resume his travels in the United States, he wrote: ''In Canada there is a great role to be played, at once noble, honorable and dangerous. It is that of a man who dedicates himself entirely to the French-Canadian people, living for their interests, exciting their passions in order to preserve their existence, making himself the disinterested and free counsel of all, mingling his life wholly with theirs, the adversary of the government each time an occasion for attack presents itself, obtaining a thousand concessions from those in power, always asking for more and, when the passions of the master and his subjects are aroused, when the people are enlightened as to their true interests, proclaiming loudly the words independence and liberty!
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SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2003
A couple of years ago, life for Adam Kikpak in the Canadian Arctic Circle town of Kugluktuk was about little more than what he called "bad stuff" and "bad people." The teenager lived on a steady diet of drugs and alcohol, dropping in and out of school and stumbling into minor trouble. Then he picked up a lacrosse stick. "It really changed my life around," said Kikpak, now 18, sober and resolved to graduate from high school in 2005. "You feel good when you go back to school and you play sports."
NEWS
March 17, 2006
Gerontology Alzheimer's risk cut by drug People who take certain high blood pressure medicines cut their risk of Alzheimer's disease by as much as 70 percent, according to new research. But doctors cautioned that people should not make changes in their medication as a result of this single report. The study found the 70 percent drop in risk among those taking a type of medication called potassium-sparing diuretics -- one of several classes of drugs designed to fight high blood pressure.
NEWS
By MYRON BECKENSTEIN | October 27, 1991
The already tangled Canadian political cord has gained a new knot.It all started in Ontario last September when the New Democratic Party (NDP) surprised the Liberals in an election and took over governing Canada's largest, wealthiest province.The two main parties in Canada are the Progressive Conservatives and the Liberals, with the NDP Number 3. (There also are Numbers 4, 5 and 6.) The NDP -- mildly socialist, in a way similar to the social democratic parties of Western Europe -- did lead in the polls for a while before 1988's federal elections, but ended up Number 3 again when the real votes were in.Ontario and Premier Bob Rae was its first major victory in a long time.
NEWS
By RUSSELL WARREN HOWE | January 23, 1994
The explosion of the former Soviet Union into 16 republics, with more on the way -- some probably from within the great Russian Federation itself -- has encouraged the division of the former Yugoslavia into five of its earlier, Austro-Hungarian Empire parts, and the five seem likely to become seven or more.The former British Somaliland has announced its secession from the formerly Italian southern portion of Somalia. If Kibris (Turkish-speaking northern Cyprus) is anything to go by, this secession is unlikely to be reversed.
NEWS
By Colin Nickerson and Colin Nickerson,BOSTON GLOBE | April 12, 2000
MONTREAL -- In fall 1897, a 7-year-old Inuit boy named Minik was delivered to New York's American Museum of Natural History by the renowned Arctic adventurer Robert E. Peary. The youngster was accompanied by five other "live Eskimo specimens," colorful in fur costume, who drew tens of thousands of gawkers in a day when explorers were super-celebrities and scrutiny of primitive societies all the rage. Within months, four of the Eskimos -- including Minik's father, Qisuk -- were dead, felled by germs to which they possessed no resistance.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 7, 1991
IQALUIT, Canada -- Peter Clarkson's heart sank when he saw the March issue of National Geographic. What doubtlessly struck southern subscribers as yet another full-color love letter to the Canadian arctic read to him like a death threat against a part of the planet he serves as a wildlife biologist.The offending article told of a team of Norwegian cross-country skiers who had recently raced a rival British group to the North Pole and won. The Norwegians said that they had been charged by a polar bear along the way and had regretfully shot the magnificent animal.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2012
For Jimmy Cornell, it was all about freedom. Early in his adult life, it came from fleeing communist Romania and finding his way to England, where he worked as a radio correspondent for the BBC. After he got married and began to help his wife, Gwenda, raise their two small children, it came in finding his way to the sea. It took until his early 30s to get there. "I was, to be honest, a hippy and I did not want a career in the BBC. I did not want to become a rich man when I was 50, I didn't care about this," Cornell recalled.
TOPIC
By Shelley Emling | May 23, 1999
MIAMI -- The explorers battled fat leeches and cliffs so steep and slippery, one false step could mean a plunge of thousands of feet.They navigated a raging, treacherous river. They even heard rumors of the Dugmas, a cult of females who load their fingernails with snake venom for attacks on outsiders.It sounds like an Indiana Jones-style adventure, but it was real.The expedition, sponsored by the National Geographic Society and conducted in November, took four Americans into the inner gorge of the Zangbo River, the world's deepest canyon, in a remote part of Tibet.
TRAVEL
By Judi Dash and By Judi Dash,Special to the Sun | July 30, 2000
Think of Canada, and vast mountain, valley and ocean vistas flash to mind, punctuated with images of grazing moose, lumbering bear and breaching whales. Often, though, the relationship between travelers and all that great nature is not entirely natural. Glaciers and sea life frequently are viewed from the crowded decks of cruise ships plying the Far West's Inside Passage. The seascapes of Nova Scotia are glimpsed from behind the thick glass of motorcoaches. The majestic Rockies whiz by in a blur outside tourist trains.
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