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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 30, 2011
The Rev. Frederick A. Homann, a Jesuit priest and educator who had been chairman of the mathematics department at what is now Loyola University Maryland, died Aug. 24 of a heart attack at St. Joseph's University in Philadelphia. He was 82. Father Homann was born and raised in Philadelphia, was a graduate of St. Joseph Preparatory School and attended Villanova University for a year before entering the Society of Jesus in 1947. He earned a bachelor's degree in philosophy in 1951 from St. Louis University, which was followed in 1954 by a licentiate in philosophy.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 14, 1993
'Tiny Alice' will open Friday at Fells Point Corner TheatreThe richest woman in the world offers to donate a fortune to the church, but her terms seem less than saintly in Edward Albee's 1964 metaphysical mystery play, "Tiny Alice," which opens Friday at Fells Point Corner Theatre, 251 S. Ann St.Fells Point Corner's production of this challenging exploration of faith, power and wealth will be directed by Steve Goldklang. The cast includes Joseph Moore, Jennifer Brown, Mark E. Campion, Christopher Thomas Clegg and Roger Buchanan.
NEWS
October 10, 2007
Pakistan's Pervez Musharraf got himself elected president in a country where polls show Osama bin Laden is more popular than he is. Of course, the electorate in last week's balloting was confined to members of the national and regional legislatures. And, oh yes, opposition groups all refused to take part. Even the U.S. Electoral College is more democratic than that. A recent survey found that the one thing Pakistanis want from their government more than anything else is the development of a system with free elections, a free press and an independent judiciary.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | January 6, 1993
The call of the wild will have to wait for six endangere whooping cranes, born and raised in captivity at Laurel's Patuxent Wildlife Research Center.The cranes were to be part of the first wild flock of "whoopers" in Florida since 1928. But a medical examination of the 6-month-old birds was "inconclusive," and the birds will remain in Maryland until additional tests can be done, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said.The rest of the new flock -- six cranes bred and raised by the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, Wis. -- are to be released today within the 260,000-acre Kissimmee Prairie, 75 miles northwest of Vero Beach, Fla., said Georgia Parham, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife public affairs specialist.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1997
Mungo Park, a Scottish explorer whose life was as exotic as his name, dove into 18th-century Africa and found that the forest primeval could be boring."
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Columnist | July 16, 2007
I know how some of you like to whine about the heat and humidity, as if you live in Lake Tahoe or something and this kind of weather comes as a total shock. Stop deluding yourself. This is Baltimore, hon. Hell's Waiting Room in the summertime. You have to suck it up and deal with it. OK, here's what you do to beat the heat: Stay inside, grab the remote and click on Ice Road Truckers, a reality series on The History Channel that follows six lunatics as they drive their big 18-wheelers over "ice roads" carved on frozen lakes, hauling supplies to remote diamond mines near the Arctic Circle in Canada's Northwest Territories.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1997
Eric Hoberg knows a lot about parasitic relationships.Not people. Organisms.He is one of about two dozen scientists in the world drawn to the stomachs of sea birds, the intestines of sheep and the lungs of deer -- in short, to the haunts of creatures that live inside other creatures.The 43-year-old parasitologist has gone literally around the world in pursuit of lungworms, tapeworms, flukes and other dependent critters, returning, usually with his "souvenirs," to his cramped office in a chilly basement storage room of the federal Beltsville Agricultural Research Center.
FEATURES
By Galen Rowell and Galen Rowell,SPECIAL TO THE SUN TC | September 13, 1998
You have to be there to feel how a wolf's howl - beneath a crescent moon in a sky filled with dancing northern lights - forever becomes part of your soul. In early summer, time flows without punctuation as days merge into undark nights north of the Arctic Circle. Wildflowers dot the tundra and trace the edges of flowing waters in what appear to be endless mountain meadows. This place is called Nunavut, "our land" in the Inuktitut language.On April 1, 1999, the vast region of the Canadian North will become a new territory larger than any province.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | November 18, 1993
You don't often meet an art form that springs into being spontaneously, flourishes for two generations and then dies, but that may be the fate of the art of Inuit textile wall hangings so colorfully on display at the Baltimore Museum of Art.The Inuit, more commonly known as Eskimos, until the mid-20th RTC century lived a nomadic hunting and fishing existence. But in the 1950s famine coupled with a government requirement that they send their children to school drove Inuits to permanent settlements, one of which is Baker Lake in the Canadian Northwest Territories.
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