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By DOUG SMITH and DOUG SMITH,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 14, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Two U.S. pilots were killed in northern Iraq yesterday when their helicopter was shot down by insurgents, the Army said. It was the second fatal helicopter crash involving U.S. forces in less than a week and the 31st since the U.S.-led invasion in 2003. The two-seat OH-58D Kiowa went down while on combat patrol with another U.S. helicopter in Mosul, about 225 miles northwest of Baghdad. Hostile fire was reported in the area where the armed craft went down, the military said.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 20, 2004
MAKHMUR, Iraq - Thousands of ethnic Kurds are pushing into lands formerly held by Iraqi Arabs, forcing tens of thousands of them to flee to ramshackle refugee camps and transforming the demographic and political map of northern Iraq. The Kurds are returning to lands from which they were expelled by the armies of Saddam Hussein and his predecessors in the Baath Party, who ordered thousands of Kurdish villages destroyed and sent waves of Iraqi Arabs north to fill the area with supporters.
NEWS
By Paul Watson and Paul Watson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 7, 2003
PIRDAWD, Iraq -- American aircraft struck a convoy of Kurdish fighters and U.S. Special Forces yesterday in a "friendly fire" attack that Kurds said killed at least 18 and wounded dozens more. U.S. military officials said they were investigating what could be one of the deadliest such accidents of the war on Iraq. A statement from Central Command said the allied aircraft were providing close air support near the village of Kalak, about 30 miles southeast of Mosul. The number of casualties was unclear.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 30, 2003
SAMARRA, Iraq - Facing continued attacks on U.S. soldiers and a growing number of confrontations between Americans and Iraqis, U.S. military officials said yesterday that they would begin sending more soldiers on patrols in areas where anti-American sentiment is rising. The decision came as U.S. officials debate whether the U.S. military force in Iraq needs to be larger and to remain in Iraq longer than Pentagon officials had anticipated and whether the U.S. civil administration in Iraq should be overhauled for the second time in a month.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | April 30, 1991
OK, we get all the poor Kurds into secure camps in northern Iraq. Then what?Yeltsin is tackling the striking Russian miners now. If he doesn't come back, send lots of sandwiches and vodka down the shaft.You know time has move on when they are protecting Formstone as an endangered species.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 21, 2003
ANKARA, Turkey - The Turkish parliament voted yesterday to open the country's airspace to U.S. warplanes, setting the stage for a second front in northern Iraq, which allies hope will speed the war and save lives. The government-sponsored proposal allows U.S.-led coalition planes and missiles to fly over Turkey, but it doesn't address a U.S. request to use military bases or move ground troops across Muslim Turkey, a NATO member. No date has been set for a vote on that larger request. Yesterday's decision, which passed 332-202, gives warplanes based in Europe and the United States a path into Iraq other than over Israel and Jordan.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 30, 2003
ANKARA, Turkey - The Turkish parliament has approved a limited amnesty for Kurdish rebels hiding in northern Iraq, a step sought by the United States aimed at ridding that region of Kurdish fighters and the Turkish troops arrayed against them. Hoping yesterday's move will enhance Turkey's chances to join the European Union, the ruling Justice and Development Party pushed the law through parliament with ease. The law will reduce prison sentences for some jailed Kurdish separatists and pardon those who lay down weapons in Iraq and return home as long as they did not participate in attacks against Turkish targets.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 26, 2003
ANKARA, Turkey - After months of foot-dragging, Turkey's government asked Parliament yesterday to authorize the basing of 62,000 U.S. troops in Turkey for use in a possible war against Iraq. A vote is expected this week. The government sent the proposal to Parliament even though it is negotiating with the United States on terms of deployment and the size of an aid package. Turkey has been demanding billions of dollars in grants and loans in exchange for its support in a war against Iraq.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 27, 2003
DIYARBAKIR, Turkey - Gen. Hilmi Ozkok, chief of staff of the Turkish armed forces, said yesterday that barring human catastrophe or open warfare between rival Kurdish factions, Turkey would not send more troops into northern Iraq. "This is not our war," the general said, reading from a prepared text at a local military base here. "This is not our mission." His announcement eased fears of a war-within-a-war on the northern front, though Ozkok did say that he reserved the right to send additional forces into Iraq if the situation there spins out of control.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 25, 2003
NUSAYBIN, Turkey - The nearly deserted Nezirhan Hotel, which bills itself as a "unique tourism complex," has seen better times. And thanks to Saddam Hussein, it hopes to see them again soon. Just last week, said Mehmet Devrimci, one of three brothers who own the hotel, a United Nations representative dropped by to negotiate room and board for the staff of some of its relief agencies in northern Iraq. Others have inquired whether there is space in his 72-room inn, complete with its half-size Olympic swimming pool, now empty, a sports complex with tennis and basketball courts and a full track, a sauna and Turkish bath for 200. And then there are still "other" inquiries, Devrimci said mysteriously, declining to elaborate.
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