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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2010
Amtrak will acquire 70 new power-saving electric locomotives as part of a plan to rejuvenate its aging fleet on the Northeast Corridor, the manufacturer Siemens AG is expected to announce Friday. The company has been awarded a $468 million contract to provide the new generation of locomotives over a six-year period. The engines are expected to eventually replace all of Amtrak's AEM-7 and HHP-8 locomotives — breakdown-prone models used by both the national passenger railroad and Maryland's MARC commuter service.
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NEWS
September 15, 2014
In Robert Reuter's letter to the editor ( "Maglev is not the answer," Sept. 12), he identifies the great need to upgrade the Northeast Corridor's infrastructure. The proposal of an SCMAGLEV train system between Washington, D.C. and New York with an initial phase between Baltimore and Washington represents an opportunity to transform the mega-region. Undertaking this project, we will ensure that we can scale for future needs - both those we can foresee and those we cannot. With SCMAGLEV, we will choose a system technologically superior to conventional high-speed rail with extreme performance advantages.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 30, 2002
BRIDGEWATER, N.J. - When Fred Hassan wanted to prove that Pharmacia could become a globally powerful drug company five years ago, he moved it out of its London headquarters to an office park here in the state he considered "the medicine chest to the world." That shift of 380 of his employees into a gray one-story building that AT&T had abandoned to cut costs proved to be just the beginning. By 2000, Pharmacia had outgrown the space, and it took over a nearby group of buildings that was once occupied by an investment company.
NEWS
September 8, 2014
Kudos to Japan Rail and its promoters in the U.S. for their ingenuity and persistence in advancing the fortunes of magnetic levitation rail along the Northeast Corridor from Washington, D.C. to New York ( "Billions lined up for 'maglev,'" Sept. 4). As the project manager for past studies of Baltimore-Washington maglev feasibility for the federal and state transportation departments, I am convinced that 300 mile per hour rail service from Washington to Baltimore and ultimately on to New York will revolutionize travel along the Northeast and transform the recreational, business, tourist and commuter travel between Northeast cities.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
Amtrak is in the market for more than two dozen high-speed train sets capable of transporting passengers between Washington and Boston faster than its Acela Express service. The company issued a request Friday for proposals to supply it with 28 high-speed train sets, each with the capacity to carry between 400 and 450 passengers and the ability to match or exceed Acela speeds — to about 160 mph — on Amtrak's existing Northeast Corridor infrastructure. "With packed trains and increasing demand, the need to expand the capacity of Amtrak's high-speed service cannot be overstated," said Joseph Boardman, Amtrak's president and CEO, in a statement.
NEWS
May 12, 2014
No doubt there were some lumps in throats at Amtrak headquarters last month when they heard the words "collapse" and "rail line" in Baltimore. As it happens, it was a CSX freight line that was affected by the loss of a 120-year-old retaining wall in Charles Village that sent tons of dirt, pavement and cars spilling onto the tracks below. But it might have been the Baltimore and Potomac Tunnel, Amtrak's only passage through West Baltimore. It's 140 years old and can't accommodate more than two tracks, double-stacked trains or speeds above 30 miles per hour.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2012
Sometime after 8 p.m. Thursday, a train will come roaring out of the north from Delaware toward Perryville at 165 miles per hour, matching the fastest speed ever attained on a U.S. rail line. After putting on the brakes, the Acela Express will make the 13-minute run back to Wilmington before sprinting down the track for seven more round trips by 2 a.m. Similar tests also are to be carried out this week and next on three other sections of track - in New Jersey, Rhode Island and Massachusetts - the first step in upgrading passenger service in those areas to 160 mph. Federal regulations require tests of 5 mph above maximum operating speeds.
NEWS
February 18, 2003
MTA buses and light rail: No service in the morning. May run by afternoon. Metro subway: Canceled MARC trains and commuter bus service: Canceled. MTA mobility service for people with disabilities: Canceled. BWI Airport: Open with limited service. Call your airline or check www.bwiairport.com Amtrak: Running in Northeast Corridor. Trains south of Washington may be delayed.
NEWS
October 25, 2005
Amtrak has been mismanaged, ridiculed, financially starved and neglected over the years. What more insults can be heaped upon the nation's bedraggled intercity rail passenger service? How about ripping out its heart? That's essentially what Amtrak's own board of directors wants to do by splitting off the Northeast Corridor. And the surgery is being conducted quietly. The board's resolution to hand the corridor over to a consortium of the federal government and the states was approved last month - but the information wasn't widely disseminated until it was reported on by an industry newsletter Oct. 12. Congress needs to stop this before Amtrak gets railroaded out of business.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1997
"Several thousand" Amtrak and about 2,000 MARC rail passengers were delayed for up to three hours yesterday morning after an Amtrak train pulled down railway electrical wires as it switched tracks in Baltimore.No one was injured when a northbound Metroliner switching tracks near MARC's West Baltimore station at 6: 15 a.m. hit overhead wires that provide power to the train, said Rick Remington, spokesman for Amtrak's Northeast Corridor.The incident closed two tracks shared by Maryland Rail Commuter trains and Amtrak.
BUSINESS
Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Two Maryland lawmakers joined Amtrak and Obama administration officials at Penn Station on Monday morning to call for long-term federal funding of transportation projects — pointing to Baltimore's 141-year-old passenger rail tunnel as a prime example of the need. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski and Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, both Democrats, said Congress needs to get beyond its recent habit of enacting short-term extensions of federal transportation funding and pass legislation providing a predicable flow of money for long-term, big-ticket projects.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
State and federal transportation officials studying the replacement of an aged rail tunnel beneath Baltimore are opening the discussion to local residents and Amtrak and MARC commuters. The 1.4-mile Baltimore & Potomac Tunnel, considered a key bottleneck for commuter and freight traffic up and down the nation's busy Northeast Corridor, is 141 years old and a curvy, tight fit for today's modern trains — limiting their capacity and reducing their speed. The aging tunnel cuts beneath the Sandtown-Winchester, Upton and Bolton Hill neighborhoods of west and central Baltimore, between the West Baltimore MARC Station and Baltimore's Penn Station.
NEWS
May 12, 2014
No doubt there were some lumps in throats at Amtrak headquarters last month when they heard the words "collapse" and "rail line" in Baltimore. As it happens, it was a CSX freight line that was affected by the loss of a 120-year-old retaining wall in Charles Village that sent tons of dirt, pavement and cars spilling onto the tracks below. But it might have been the Baltimore and Potomac Tunnel, Amtrak's only passage through West Baltimore. It's 140 years old and can't accommodate more than two tracks, double-stacked trains or speeds above 30 miles per hour.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
A four-vehicle collision with injury in Towson on Interstate 83 North prior to the Baltimore Beltway has closed the northbound right traffic lane and northbound left shoulder at 7:36 a.m., according to the state Department of Transportation. DOT has reported that all lanes have been reopened on I-95 North with the clearing of a three-vehicle collision with injury in Edgewood at the MD 24 exit. The Baltimore City Department of Public Works reported a 12-inch water main break in the 2000 block of South Clinton Street.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
An Amtrak train tore down overhead catenary power lines in an accident near Bowie on Thursday morning, disrupting rail traffic in the area and the commutes of many MARC and Amtrak riders, according to the Maryland Transit Administration. Craig Schulz, an Amtrak spokesman, said the incident occurred about 9:30 a.m. and left the Northeast Corridor train No. 181 — carrying 177 passengers — without power. It also stopped all Amtrak and MARC traffic between Baltimore and Washington.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
Amtrak is in the market for more than two dozen high-speed train sets capable of transporting passengers between Washington and Boston faster than its Acela Express service. The company issued a request Friday for proposals to supply it with 28 high-speed train sets, each with the capacity to carry between 400 and 450 passengers and the ability to match or exceed Acela speeds — to about 160 mph — on Amtrak's existing Northeast Corridor infrastructure. "With packed trains and increasing demand, the need to expand the capacity of Amtrak's high-speed service cannot be overstated," said Joseph Boardman, Amtrak's president and CEO, in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
The first of 70 new energy-efficient locomotives destined for Amtrak's East Coast service rolled off Monday morning from a Sacramento, Calif., assembly line. The locomotives, called Amtrak Cities Sprinters and built by Siemens Rail Systems, will replace Amtrak equipment that has been in service for more than two decades and has logged an average of 3.5 million miles. The new engines, costing $466 million, will be used on the Northeast Corridor between Washington and Boston and on the Philadelphia-to-Harrisburg Keystone Corridor.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
A $1 million project to renovate bathrooms at Penn Station in Baltimore, in part to make them accessible to individuals with disabilities, has been completed ahead of schedule, local transportation officials announced Wednesday. The joint project between Amtrak and the Maryland Transit Administration began in July 2013. Amtrak operates Acela Express, Northeast Regional and short- and long-distance services out of the station. The state is "making significant investments to make transit more accessible, convenient and enjoyable for more people," said MTA Administrator Robert Smith in a statement.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2013
State police reported that travelers will encounter delays on I-95 in Harford and Cecil counties Sunday afternoon. An accident about 2:30 p.m. near the Northeast exit closed all but one lane of the highway and produced delays throughout the afternoon. Police said that there were numerous small accidents Sunday morning on the highway, which is experiencing some of its heaviest usage of the year. "It's a busy day at the airport but things have gone well for travelers," said Jonathan Dean, a spokesman for BWI-Thurgood Marshall Airport.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
The locomotive pulling an Amtrak train came off its tracks in the Baltimore and Potomac Tunnel in downtown Baltimore Monday, shutting down all local train activity on the Penn Line and disrupting the evening commute. Train 97 was carrying 158 passengers en route from New York to Miami when the front wheels of its locomotive derailed in the tunnel around 7 p.m., an Amtrak release said. No one was injured, and the passenger cars remained upright and on the tracks. Around 7:30 a.m. Tuesday, MARC officials said Amtrak had temporarily suspended service between Baltimore and Washington due to a crane in the tunnel towing the disabled train away.
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