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NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2012
Twenty years after opening its first large residence for students, the Maryland Institute College of Art plans to build a $16.5 million addition that will increase the number of undergraduates living on campus and help revitalize Baltimore's North Avenue corridor and northern Bolton Hill. College officials intend to break ground this fall on Commons II, a five-story building with 62 apartments that can accommodate about 240 students. When it opens in the fall of 2013, MICA will have on-campus housing for more than 1,000 students, up from practically none in 1991 and enough for more than half of its undergraduates.
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NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | April 29, 1992
A Rosedale man has been convicted of first-degree murder in the death of an 81-year-old man who was smothered in his bed during a robbery at an East Baltimore house where the victim lived for more than 50 years.A Baltimore Circuit Court jury deliberated for about nine hours yesterday before convicting Ralph Raymon Steele, 38, of the 5500 block of Hamilton Ave. in the death of Willie Gilmore. Mr. Gilmore was slain Oct. 5, 1991, in his home in the 2800 block of E. North Ave."He was the first black man to buy a home on North Avenue.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2005
Watched by a few motorists stopped at a traffic light on North Avenue near Aisquith Street, a group of youngsters painted a bright, abstract mural on a burned-out rowhouse. The group from the One World Cultural Arts Society's summer camp was participating last week in a program to transform the weathered plywood covering windows and doors on abandoned buildings along a stretch of North Avenue into something colorful. The project, which was started this summer by Mayor Martin O'Malley and the East North Avenue Community Development Corp.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
A 780-pound steer headed for slaughter in West Baltimore seized a chance at freedom Friday, leaping a barbed-wire fence and taking a brisk two-mile walk along North Avenue that ended when the animal was gunned down by police in Mid-Town Belvedere. The steer was first spotted about 10:15 a.m. after escaping from the George G. Ruppersberger & Sons Inc. slaughterhouse in the 2600 block of Pennsylvania Ave., according to police. It was shot less than an hour later. Scores of people took pictures of the felled animal at North Charles and Preston Street, and the incident became fodder for social media, which lit up with pictures, Internet memes ("Cow Ripken")
NEWS
October 14, 2006
On October 9, 2006, YETTA E. BURTON dear mother of Frizel, Claudette "Cookie", Odell, Diana and Waleta, sister of Yvonne, Elwin and Raymond. Visitation at the JOSEPH L. RUSS FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 2222-28 W. North Avenue on Sunday from 2 to 6 P.M. Wake at Providence Baptist Church, 1401 Pennsylvania Avenue on Monday from 10:30 to11:00 A.M. , funeral service to follow.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | April 7, 2001
ALL MY LIFE I've admired the TastyKake sign that stood atop the rowhouse roof on North Avenue at Guilford Avenue. A huge sign with faded blue paint. Its clock hands were stopped perpetually - I think at 20 minutes past something. The other night, when the city's traffic patterns went haywire because of a Jones Falls Expressway accident, I went home via a slightly different route than usual. And presto - the sign was gone. So was the whole block of North Avenue houses, whose westernmost unit supported it. The lot had been cleared and covered with yellow straw peeping through the clay and some scattered bits of freshly cleared debris.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2004
The distressing sight of boarded-up rowhouses along Druid Hill Avenue, between Baltimore's biggest park and North Avenue, makes it hard to believe that this decayed neighborhood was once home for many of the city's most successful African-American strivers. From the 1920s until the late 1940s, this was the famed Sugar Hill, the namesake of a similarly upscale part of Harlem. Prominent lawyers and educators lived in the modest, cramped two-story rowhouses near Druid Hill Park; so did waiters, bell captains and postal workers.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | March 1, 2013
Mortician Erich March told me he was tired of seeing people in his East Baltimore community die of conditions like diabetes and hypertension. He blamed the lack of grocery shopping choices in the neighborhood where he grew up and where his Aisquith Street funeral home is located. He and his wife, Michele Speaks-March, were determined to bring a new style of shopping to the Oliver, South Clifton and Darley Park neighborhoods. They were not targeting the vegan or food faddist crowd.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | February 14, 2009
Not all landmarks are beautiful. For more than 90 years, what is now a fire-blackened, gutted building at the northwest corner of Charles Street and North Avenue has been a rusty anchor of this intersection. Never a beauty, it seemed in need of paint, a new roof and a better reputation. But even as it rests, due for demolition, it deserves to have its life story told. Some people call it Goldbloom's, after a popular apparel shop that occupied the ground floor for decades. I grew up hearing it called the Hotel Chateau but never knew of any rooms being rented there.
NEWS
December 18, 2003
On December 14, 2003, DELORES. Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME EAST, 1101 East North Avenue on Thursday after 9 A.M., The family will receive friends at Eastern United Methodist Church, 1429 E. North Avenue on Friday at 10 A.M. Funeral Services will follow at 10:30. See www.marchfh.com
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