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By WILLIAM DONALD SCHAEFER | September 21, 1993
Annapolis. -- An important part of every governor's job is to listen when the voters have something to say. And one thing I have heard a lot lately is that we should focus on problems right here at home and forget about building relationships with other countries or developing our capacity to compete internationally.We no longer have that choice. We live in a world that has changed dramatically over the last few decades. Technology, communications, transportation have brought all nations physically closer.
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NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | December 3, 2007
Democrats yearn for the bounteous days of Bill Clinton's presidency, when the economy was flourishing, there were good jobs at good wages and poverty was on the wane. So it's a puzzle that on one of his signature achievements - the North American Free Trade Agreement - the party's presidential candidates are sprinting away from his record as fast as they can. It's as though Republicans were calling for defense cuts while invoking Ronald Reagan. Even Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton can't bring herself to defend the deal her husband pushed through.
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NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | November 17, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Whatever claims have been made for or against the North American Free Trade Agreement during the national argument over its passage, one thing is certain: None has been understated.To hear each side tell it, we are either on the verge of a golden dawn of global opportunity with an accelerating economy and higher-paying jobs, or a grim return to depression with wages and work standards dragged ever lower by an unequal partnership with an impoverished neighbor.Hyperbole has become humdrum as the charges and counter-charges have escalated: Images of the Last Supper have been invoked, the Louisiana Purchase recalled, and comparison made with the 1964 Civil Rights Act.There is likely to be more of the same today when the House of Representatives agonizes aloud over whether to create the world's largest free trade zone among the United States, Canada and Mexico.
NEWS
January 16, 2004
PRESIDENT BUSH wanted to talk about free trade. His counterparts at the Summit of the Americas pointedly did not; they focused on the plight of the poor in their home countries. At the end of the two-day summit this week in Mexico, neither agenda prevailed and the conference ended with the Latin Americans grudgingly resigned to pushing ahead on talks for a hemisphere-wide free-trade zone. Mr. Bush didn't change anyone's mind with his pitch that free trade was "the most certain path to lasting prosperity," but as far as these summits go, the president gained more than he lost.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Mexico City Bureau | November 17, 1993
MEXICO CITY -- While the furious debate over the North American Free Trade Agreement reaches its deciding moment in the United States, the debate in Mexico has only recently begun to heat up.The sort of intense criticism of NAFTA in the United States has not been allowed in the news media here. However, over the last week, opponents have succeeded in getting their voices heard.Their successes may seem small compared with the efforts of NAFTA opponents in the United States. And the messages of opposition may be too late to have any effect on the vote in the U.S. Congress today.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,WASHINGTON BUREAUWashington Bureau Staff writers Carl Cannon and Nelson Schwartz contributed to this report | November 17, 1993
WASHINGTON -- After long weeks of bargaining and cajolery, Bill Clinton is poised to record one of the most significant victories of his young presidency in tonight's showdown vote in the House on the North American Free Trade Agreement.Yesterday, for the first time, a flurry of new commitments put Mr. Clinton ahead of the NAFTA opponents in public commitments. And as the day wore on, the president's lead appeared to be widening.Mr. Clinton declared in a television interview last night that he "will be surprised" if the agreement doesn't gain approval.
NEWS
By Michael Riley and Michael Riley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 1, 1998
EL PASO, Texas -- Celia Rodriguez came to the United States more than 30 years ago from Mexico. For most of that time, she lived out the immigrant's dream. She advanced through several jobs in clothing factories and became an inspector. She married, raised a family and became a citizen.The dream soured in 1996 when, responding to the incentives of the North American Free Trade Agreement, the garment industry fled this west-Texas border town. Rodriguez lost her job. Though she has gone through a federal retraining program and is still job-hunting, she hasn't worked since.
NEWS
By Washington Bureau | November 14, 1993
The House of Representatives will vote Wednesday on the North American Free Trade Agreement, a complex and ambitious piece of legislation to create the world's largest free-trade zone. It is timely, then, to look at what is proposed and why it has aroused such opposition:1. What is NAFTA? The North American Free Trade Agreement would eliminate most barriers to the export and import of goods and services among the United States, Canada and Mexico over the next 15 years. It is also designed to encourage investment among the three partners and to protect their patents, trademarks, copyrights and recordings.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1993
NAFTA accord reported nearNegotiators from Canada, Mexico and the United States have completed most of their work on labor and environmental issues connected with the North American Free Trade Agreement and might announce side agreements on these issues as soon as today or tomorrow, officials and congressional aides said.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 7, 1992
Baltimore needs Mother Teresa for more than one day.If the Serbs don't cut it out, we'll . . . we'll . . . we'll . . .We have to go shooting into Bosnia and Somalia to save people's lives.Negotiators are wrapping up the North American Free Trade Agreement pronto so that abortion won't be the only emotional issue of this election.Yo-yo-ing in space didn't work. The next experiment will be Ultimate Frisbee.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2003
MIAMI - Eddie Bartee Jr. practically has molten steel coursing through his blood: He grew up in Sparrows Point. His father spent 26 years as a leader of the United Steelworkers local at Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s sprawling plant at the mouth of the Patapsco River in eastern Baltimore County. And when Bartee began working at the factory three decades ago, he joined more than two dozen other family members already there. But since Bethlehem filed for bankruptcy protection last year and its shrunken Baltimore plant was taken over by International Steel Group Inc. of Cleveland, Bartee has seen many of those relatives struggle with the loss of pension and health care benefits in retirement.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2003
Morgan Wheeler, a Baltimore electrician and union member, has for nearly a decade been opposed to free-trade agreements that he believes cost U.S. jobs and allow companies to push environmental concerns aside to increase profits. But with the number of manufacturing jobs shrinking and more than 300 of his fellow electricians out of work, Wheeler is now angry enough to take to the streets with that cause. Last weekend, he and his wife headed to Belvedere Square in North Baltimore to hand out fliers denouncing the Free Trade Area of the Americas, a proposed international agreement that would end many restrictions on trade within the Western Hemisphere.
NEWS
April 24, 2001
THE STUNNING aspect of the summit of 34 American nations in Quebec City over the weekend was that all the heads of government were elected by their peoples. That has often not been the case in the Americas. This legitimacy is what stands out most about their commitment to strengthen democracy in the hemisphere and to negotiate a Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) by 2005. Only Fidel Castro of Cuba was not there, excluded by the club as a dictator. President Jean-Bertrand Aristide of Haiti endured a lecture from the host, fellow Francophone Prime Minister Jean Chretien of Canada, for the shortcomings in his election last May. The notion of restricting the proposed free trade area to democracies, though vaguely stated, strengthens fair elections and discourages coups.
NEWS
By Michael Riley and Michael Riley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 1, 1998
EL PASO, Texas -- Celia Rodriguez came to the United States more than 30 years ago from Mexico. For most of that time, she lived out the immigrant's dream. She advanced through several jobs in clothing factories and became an inspector. She married, raised a family and became a citizen.The dream soured in 1996 when, responding to the incentives of the North American Free Trade Agreement, the garment industry fled this west-Texas border town. Rodriguez lost her job. Though she has gone through a federal retraining program and is still job-hunting, she hasn't worked since.
NEWS
October 14, 1997
SOUTH AMERICA has changed since the last U.S. president, George Bush, visited in 1990. It is more democratic, more prosperous, more modern and has freer markets. President Clinton may have tried to emulate the hollow rhetorical flourishes that have characterized the relationship. But his mission differs from previous presidential descents on the continent.The president is not pushing small Latin republics around. He may have embraced Venezuela's President Rafael Caldera yesterday, but what he wants is more oil from that country, and less cocaine.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 6, 1997
MEXICO CITY -- President Clinton arrived last night for a two-day visit kicking off his first Latin American tour -- and giving this capital a more festive air than usual for Cinco de Mayo.But Clinton's appearance also starkly underscored the huge gap that exists in this country between the upper classes able to ride the bandwagon of the new global economy and those left behind by the North American Free Trade Agreement and other efforts at modernization.Clinton and his wife, Hillary Rodham Clinton, who arrived earlier in the day, are staying in the swank Presidente Inter-Continental, a luxury hotel in the middle of a toney neighborhood called Polanco, known for its fancy restaurants and expensive boutiques.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | November 15, 1991
U.S. Commerce Secretary Robert A. Mosbacher, in Baltimore on the 28th stop in a 30-city road show, said Maryland businesses must be prepared to export their goods and services in the global market.Mosbacher and representatives of five other federal agencies have been traveling around the country telling small- and medium-sized businesses about programs that are available to help them export their products. They say the global market will offer a way for American companies to maintain or increase sales despite a slump in the domestic economy.
NEWS
October 6, 1992
Just in time, before the North American Free Trade Agreement is initialed tomorrow in the presence of the leaders of the United States, Mexico and Canada, Gov. Bill Clinton has announced his support for the treaty -- as written. This is a far cry from the demands of organized labor and Democratic protectionists in Congress for a renegotiation that, in effect, could kill the landmark pact.To give himself political cover, the Democratic candidate for president tossed in all sorts of caveats and ambiguities that the Bush administration equates with holding the treaty hostage.
NEWS
December 13, 1994
With respect to NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement) and GATT (General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade), President Clinton brought closure to great initiatives by Republican predecessors. The shoe is on the other foot for AFTA (the proposed Americas Free Trade Agreement).Mr. Clinton has led 22 presidents and 12 prime ministers in endorsing the concept of free trade from Baffin Island to Tierra del Fuego and setting a realistically challenging date of 2005 for final agreement on terms.
NEWS
December 9, 1994
The summit of the Americas in Miami today through Sunday will fail if it produces only a vague statement of intent to create an Americas Free Trade Area (AFTA) in the next century.It will succeed if it establishes a date for negotiations and achievement nearer than the goals in the Asia-Pacific rim declaration at the APEC meeting in Indonesia; if it brings Chile next year into negotiations on joining the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA); if it mobilizes pressure on the uninvited Fidel Castro to allow democratic change in Cuba; if it can make progress on the narcotics and environmental crises.
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