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SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2000
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- No longer fighting for a place in the rotation, Orioles right-hander Pat Rapp is making a hard charge at the third spot behind Mike Mussina and Sidney Ponson. It's not a question of if he'll be on the starting staff. Just where. Rapp stated his case again yesterday by limiting the Minnesota Twins to one hit and an unearned run over four innings. He retired the first nine batters he faced before right fielder Albert Belle's three-base error to open the fourth interrupted his momentum.
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NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1999
The Baltimore County Council is expected to award a 10-year, $82 million health-care contract tonight without formally checking whether other companies could do the work better or cheaper.On advice from a consultant, the County Council likely will approve a pact with CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield to administer medical claims and provide other services for most of Baltimore County's 22,400 teachers, police officers, public works employees and other workers.The county is bypassing the competitive bidding process designed to ensure that taxpayers get the best deal.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1999
The Baltimore County Council is expected to award a 10-year, $82 million health care contract tonight without formally checking whether other companies could do the work better or cheaper.On advice from a consultant, the County Council likely will approve a pact with CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield to administer medical claims and provide other services for most of Baltimore County's 22,400 teachers, police officers, public works employees and other workers.The county is bypassing the competitive bidding process designed to ensure that taxpayers get the best deal.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1999
When the Howard County Recreation and Parks Department was searching this year for a place to run its summer horseback riding camp, officials looked for an established stable with high-quality instruction and top-notch facilities.They found it -- in Baltimore County.The decision to award an eight-week contract worth nearly $14,000 to an equestrian center outside Howard has raised questions about how such contracts are awarded -- without bids -- and prompted a County Council member to ask whether government should be funding such a program at all.Councilman Allan H. Kittleman says he's sympathetic to the concerns of private business owners like Darrell E. Putman, who runs the Sundance Equestrian Center in Woodbine.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1999
When the Howard County Recreation and Parks Department was searching this year for a place to run its summer horseback riding camp, officials looked for an established stable with high-quality instruction and top-notch facilities.They found it -- in Baltimore County.The decision to award an eight-week contract worth nearly $14,000 to an equestrian center outside Howard has raised questions about how such contracts are awarded -- without bids -- and prompted a County Council member to ask whether government should be funding such a program at all.Councilman Allan H. Kittleman says he's sympathetic to the concerns of private business owners like Darrell E. Putman, who runs the Sundance Equestrian Center in Woodbine.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1999
Gov. Parris N. Glendening abruptly replaced yesterday a longtime member of the board overseeing the state Injured Workers Insurance Fund -- a person who has been sharply critical of recent agency actions including the awarding of a controversial no-bid contract.Glendening replaced Louise Keelty with Michael J. Wagner of Annapolis, a former Democratic state senator and delegate. Also named to the five-member board was Gail C. McDonald of Prince George's County. M. Joseph Coale was reappointed to another five-year term.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | February 17, 1999
Gov. Parris N. Glendening has ordered the creation of a task force to review the state Injured Workers' Insurance Fund, after its award of a multimillion-dollar no-bid contract.In a letter made public yesterday, Glendening's chief of staff, Major F. Riddick Jr., disclosed that the task force will be asked to assess the structure of the fund's governing board and the agency's operations.In the Feb. 15 letter to Montgomery Democratic Sen. Ida G. Ruben, Riddick wrote, "Recently, there have been concerns raised relative to several issues including the management of the agency itself."
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | February 5, 1999
A top official of the company that won a $21 million contract from the state Injured Workers Insurance Fund met repeatedly with the head of that agency in the months before the award and ultimately got just what his firm wanted, a negotiated no-bid contract.A document obtained by The Sun shows that Joseph B. Harlan, an official of Statutory Benefits Management Corp., met with IWIF President Paul M. Rose on 11 occasions between July 1995 and April 1, 1996, when the agency formally solicited proposals for a managed health care contract.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1998
SAN DIEGO -- If there was any remaining doubt that the 1998 New York Yankees are one of the best teams in baseball history, it disappeared into the clear California sky in the eighth inning last night.Third baseman Scott Brosius, the No. 9 hitter in the Yankees' batting order for most of the season, blasted a long three-run home run off super reliever Trevor Hoffman to overcome another late-inning deficit and send the San Diego Padres to a 5-4 defeat in Game 3 of the 94th World Series.That pretty much cinches it. Hoffman was the Padres' last line of defense.
SPORTS
By BOSTON GLOBE | October 2, 1998
ATLANTA -- While the rest of the baseball world was captivated this summer by the mesmerizing feats of the New York Yankees and the Bunyanesque home run race between Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa, the Atlanta Braves quietly dominated their little corner of the national pastime.Last night in prime time, the Braves showed a nationwide television audience what they're made of -- pitching, timely hitting, and plenty of resilience.Given up for dead, they rallied to beat the Chicago Cubs, 2-1, on Chipper Jones' one-out single in the 10th inning and grabbed a 2-0 lead in their best-of-five National League Division Series.
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