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Nitrogen

FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to the Sun | August 16, 2008
My compost pile smells. It never did before. I've been adding table scraps (no meat or dairy products), plus grass and weeds. Unpleasant odor can be caused by too much nitrogen (green/fresh plant material) or too much water and not enough air. Since all your materials are "green," balance them with "brown" materials, which are high in carbon. Such items include dead dried leaves, sawdust and straw. You can use shredded newspaper, too, but go lightly. If you've been watering the pile, cut back on that.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to the Sun | July 19, 2008
Every time a baby squash starts to grow, it dies. I water the garden every day with a hose, but my squash still dry up. How can I stop this? Most vegetable plants don't like wet foliage. Choanephora wet rot is a fungus encouraged by rainy years but also by watering overhead and too often. The fuzzy black or brown fungal growth occurs in squash (and pumpkin) blossoms, causing them to abort or, at the connection of the blossom to the young fruit, to wither. Try watering at the base of the plants, only to supplement rainfall.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | June 19, 2008
It was November 2006, and Tim Askew had his hands full just dealing with the idea that his new company's technology could treat esophageal cancer. He hadn't even launched his first product, he had few employees, and revenue was still months away. But then he got a call from Dr. William Krimsky, and his world got a lot more complicated "He single-handedly changed the course of the company," said Askew, who is chief executive of CSA Medical Inc.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN REPORTER | May 27, 2008
About a mile from his office at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, Thomas Devine has reduced nine years of research to a 3-foot-wide strip of earth that runs about half the length of a football field. There, between two rows of rye, Devine grows his peculiar variety of a crop with a monster-like name: hairy vetch. And he has big plans for it - such as revolutionizing world agriculture. "We're hoping to get a good set of seeds here. All the conditions seem to be right for it," said Devine, plucking a few of the plants from the rich brown soil.
NEWS
By Arthur D. Hershey | May 8, 2008
The Chesapeake region's largest wastewater treatment facility - Washington, D.C.'s Blue Plains Sewage Treatment Plant - is finally getting the attention it deserves. Congressional leaders have called hearings to investigate the bay's largest source of harmful nutrient pollution. The D.C. Water and Sewer Authority has made great strides to initially address reducing pollution at Blue Plains, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is finally requiring the plant to do more. But the primary issue facing the water and sewer authority, Congress and ultimately the ratepayers is costly funding.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | February 19, 2008
The Chesapeake Bay Commission is asking Congress for $4 million to help pay for improvements to the Blue Plains sewage treatment plant in Washington, a massive facility that each day discharges more than 300 million gallons of treated wastewater into bay tributaries. The plant was upgraded just a decade ago, when the Environmental Protection Agency said it had to reduce its discharge of nitrogen pollution into the Potomac River. But the agency is holding plants to even higher standards now, and getting a huge plant such as Blue Plains to meet them would make a significant difference in the bay's health, advocates say. "If the country is going to have a state-of-the-art facility, it should be in the nation's capital," said Ann Swanson, the bay commission's executive director.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement | November 24, 2007
You said not to fertilize because of the fall drought. Can I fertilize now? Fall is the best time to fertilize cool-season grasses. Go ahead now that it has rained. It is still advisable to use a slow-release fertilizer with a nitrogen source that has at least a 30 percent to 40 percent water-insoluble nitrogen source, usually identified as WIN on the bag label. Slow-release fertilizers are less likely to leach or run off the lawn and cause problems with water quality in the Chesapeake Bay. Be sure to not apply fertilizer where it can get onto impervious surfaces, such as sidewalks, driveways or roads.
NEWS
November 14, 2007
Funding available for septic upgrade The Anne Arundel County Department of Health is funding nitrogen-reducing units for septic systems through the Chesapeake Bay Restoration Fund, which is supported by a state grant. Applications are available on the department's Web site at www.aahealth.org or by calling 410-222-7193. Nitrogen-reducing pretreatment units are designed to decrease nitrogen in wastewater and extend the life of a septic system. Reducing excess nitrogen from septic systems helps protect against algal blooms, low oxygen and fish kills.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | August 23, 2007
Call it better drinking through chemistry. Last Saturday night at Ixia, molecular mixologist Tom Cusack chilled mojitos and beer with liquid nitrogen. Fog streamed down glasses and bottles onto the bar, and patrons slurped shots without glasses. Baltimore isn't known for setting nightlife trends. But with Cusack behind the bar, that might change. The 23-year-old Cusack (not related to the actors, by the way) works in neurobiology at Johns Hopkins Hospital during the day and tends bar at Ixia Friday and Saturday nights.
NEWS
July 25, 2007
Program pushes local products A farmers' association yesterday urged Anne Arundel County residents to buy locally grown products this month during the "Buy Local Challenge." The program, conceived by the Southern Maryland Agricultural Development Commission, seeks to boost the local farm economy and to highlight taste, nutrition and health benefits of local products. The Anne Arundel Economic Development Corp., which manages and promoted county farming, has coordinated two special events for the Buy Local Challenge: Tomorrow, 2 to 6 p.m. -- The South River Colony Farmers' Market, Routes 2 and 214 in Edgewater, will have a chef demonstration using local produce prepared by the Fix New York Deli.
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