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By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2008
Anne Arundel County Council members are weighing whether to require homeowners to install a new, more expensive nitrogen-reducing septic system when making upgrades or repairs to their septic tanks. On Monday, council members approved, by a 5-2 vote, an amendment to the bill that would require the new septic tanks only in bogs and critical areas, land within 1,000 feet of tidal waters. The bill had extended the requirement outside those areas, but that language was removed because council members were concerned about the amount of state money available to reimburse homeowners, said Democratic Councilman Jamie Benoit of Crownsville.
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NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | January 11, 2009
Although County Council members and environmentalists encourage homeowners in Anne Arundel's critical areas and bogs to upgrade their septic tanks, the move won't be required after the council rejected a bill that would force homeowners in those areas to install nitrogen-reducing septic systems to improve the health of the Chesapeake Bay. Five of the council's seven members voted Monday against the bill - including one of the bill's co-sponsors, Ronald...
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Tom Horton and Heather Dewar and Tom Horton,Sun Staff | September 28, 2000
To cut back on the flow of lethal nitrogen pollution to the world's waters, Iowa corn grower Roy Bardole would need to let go of the idea that the best farmer is the one with the biggest crop. He'd have to use less fertilizer or set aside some land as a natural pollution filter -- yet still earn enough to support four generations on his 1,000 acres. Chinese fish farmer Li Zuohui would have to surrender some of the quick profits that have transformed his life. He'd have to thin out the cramped, cloudy pens where he raises grouper by the thousands and spend a big chunk of his income on nonpolluting fish food, instead of on Western-style appliances and other talismans of the good life.
NEWS
January 28, 2000
WHILE there has long been criticism of septic tank owners for not maintaining and protecting these systems, septic tanks are now under attack as a primary source of nitrogen pollution to the Chesapeake Bay. Each new person in the Bay watershed generates 8 pounds of nitrogen a year; that's an extra 24 million pounds annually deposited in the bay by 2020, if population projections are valid. Nitrogen can be effectively removed in larger sewage treatment plants. But traditional septic systems -- built for sanitation, not water pollutant removal -- can't do the job. Most of the nitrogen finds its way through soil and underground water into surface water, such as the Bay and tributaries.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2001
In what could become a model for Maryland, state, Howard County, and Chesapeake Bay Foundation officials have agreed in principle on terms for limiting future nitrogen pollution from wastewater released from an expanded Patuxent River sewage treatment plant. The agreement could set a standard for treatment plants on rivers that ring the bay and, at the local level, will allow increased Patuxent wastewater flows to accommodate Howard growth. Nitrogen is widely viewed as the most dangerous pollutant in the bay -- removing oxygen vital for bay grasses, shellfish and other creatures.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2003
Howard County's sewage treatment plant is on the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's "needs improvement" list for nitrogen pollution, but county officials say completion next year of a major plant expansion should help change its status. "We're working very diligently toward upgrading our nitrogen removal ability. There was a goal, which we are meeting," said county Department of Public Works Director James M. Irvin, referring to a promise not to put more nitrogen into Maryland's waterways despite enlarging the plant.
NEWS
By JAMES DAO and JAMES DAO,New York Times News Service | April 9, 2000
WASHINGTON -- A landmark air-pollution law enacted a decade ago to reduce acid rain has failed to slow the acidification of lakes and streams in the Adirondacks, many of which are rapidly losing the ability to sustain life, according to a new federal report. The study by the General Accounting Office, a nonpartisan research agency for Congress, raises sharp questions about the effectiveness of the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990, which set tough restrictions on smokestack emissions of sulfur and nitrogen, the two components of acid rain.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2003
Howard County's sewage treatment plant is on the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's "needs improvement" list for nitrogen pollution, but county officials say completion next year of a major plant expansion should help change its status. "We're working very diligently toward upgrading our nitrogen removal ability. There was a goal, which we are meeting," said county Department of Public Works Director James M. Irvin, referring to a promise not to put more nitrogen into Maryland's waterways despite enlarging the plant.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Heather Dewar and Sun Staff | September 24, 2000
First of five articles AASEN, Netherlands -- Leopold Hendrick admits a visitor through the locked doors of the world's first bureaucracy dedicated to tracking and taxing animal waste, a kind of manure IRS. The government administrator apologizes for the tight security: "We are not so popular. Some farmers broke in and tried to steal their dossiers." Other nations should track plutonium so closely. Dutch farmers must report to the nation's 340-employee Levy Bureau how much their 4.2 million cattle, 14 million pigs and 108 million chickens eat. They must inform the bureau of their farms' precise output, the meat and dairy products they ship away.
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