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NEWS
By Barbara M. Simon | July 15, 1994
Like the wisps of smoke escaping their lips,the smokers drift to the edge of the party.=/Along with the dust motes and lost change,they slip into corners,cluster in groups tightened by need.Cast out to the deck or the porch,under cold skies, the nicotine hungry clingto each other,the coppery ash of theirglowing cigarettes, a dying symbol.@2Unregenerate in a world obsessed with health,the smoker inhales all that is recherche, noir.Decadent ideas waft and curl like French enigmas@with each exhalation.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | September 18, 2014
Carroll Hospital Center is joining Anne Arundel Medical Center and other health systems, businesses and employers who won't hire people who smoke cigarettes or use other nicotine products. Carroll announced the policy Thursday, and it expands on a policy that bans use of tobacco products on campus. The expanded ban is expected to begin in January. Nicotine causes a wide range of health problems and is the leading cause of preventable death, hospital officials said, and is not part of the healthy lifestyle they are trying to promote.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | April 14, 1994
Humans crave it. So do mice and monkeys. Give these animals repeat doses of nicotine and they will practically beg for more.More than a decade of laboratory experiments has established a scientific basis for what smokers and research scientists have long suspected: that nicotine is a powerfully addictive chemical that makes cigarettes as difficult to kick as heroin, cocaine or alcohol.Once hooked, human subjects given nicotine-free cigarettes will quickly recognize the fraud. Rats will run like mad through an obstacle course to reach a nicotine source.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
The air is alive with perhaps a dozen sweet scents at Kahuna Vapor in Ellicott City, customers adding to the aroma with every vaporous exhalation. They're not smoking. They're "vaping" - using a battery-powered electronic cigarette that heats flavored liquid nicotine into a vapor users can inhale. Such stores are popping up fast nationwide, quadrupling in the last year alone to about 3,000, according to an estimate by the Smoke Free Alternatives Trade Association. Kahuna Vapor, one of at least three to open locally in the last two months, opened a storefront soon after starting as an online business making local deliveries.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration has concluded for the first time that nicotine is a drug that should be regulated, and it has proposed limited, initial steps for regulating tobacco products, according to officials. The proposals involving only new limits on tobacco advertising and measures to curtail sales to young people.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | January 28, 1992
THE LAST TIME John Stone tried to quit smoking he found himself in a cafe saying to a smoker, "I'm either going to kill you or you're going to give me a cigarette."This time, rather than with threats, the interior designer is trying to end his 1 1/2 -pack-a-day habit with help from a patch, which, when applied to the skin, allows nicotine gradually to enter the bloodstream."It kills the physical craving for the nicotine," Mr. Stone said on Day 24 without lighting up. "The habit is there -- the craving for having something between your fingers or in your mouth is still there . . . but this really helps."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 22, 1997
DURHAM, N.C. -- Brooke Group Ltd.'s Liggett tobacco division worked to develop a cigarette with an artificially increased nicotine impact, according to internal Liggett research documents.The cigarette maker also worked to make a "less hazardous" cigarette, although Liggett and other tobacco companies had claimed that smoking is not hazardous to a smoker's health, nor is nicotine addictive.The documents could help show that Liggett manipulated nicotine levels to keep their customers hooked on the products, evidence which could be used in court against other tobacco companies in health-related lawsuits by 22 states, including Maryland.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration has concluded for the first time that nicotine is a drug that should be regulated, and it has proposed limited, initial steps for regulating tobacco products, according to officials.But in a sign of the delicacy of the issue -- and of the opposition in the Republican Congress to new restraints on smoking -- the agency is not using the authority it has to act on its own. Instead, it has thrown the issue to President Clinton, by submitting proposed regulations to the White House.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
The air is alive with perhaps a dozen sweet scents at Kahuna Vapor in Ellicott City, customers adding to the aroma with every vaporous exhalation. They're not smoking. They're "vaping" - using a battery-powered electronic cigarette that heats flavored liquid nicotine into a vapor users can inhale. Such stores are popping up fast nationwide, quadrupling in the last year alone to about 3,000, according to an estimate by the Smoke Free Alternatives Trade Association. Kahuna Vapor, one of at least three to open locally in the last two months, opened a storefront soon after starting as an online business making local deliveries.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Days of reckoning seem to arrive so regularly for the nation's tobacco companies that potential legal catastrophe is almost routine.As the tobacco companies face an ominous government lawsuit while paying out millions of dollars in state tobacco settlements, a confrontation this week at the Supreme Court could decide the beleaguered industry's future.In a hearing set for Wednesday, the justices will examine a legal question that on the surface seems simple: Does the Food and Drug Administration have the authority to regulate nicotine as a drug, and cigarettes as a device for delivering nicotine into the human body?
HEALTH
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2011
The North Point Library is offering a free six-week course to help smokers quit. Greta Brand, a health consultant, will lead the weekly one-hour sessions that start at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. The class, paid for with a grant from the Tobacco Restitution Fund, includes free nicotine gum, patches and lozenges. Registration is requested. The library is at 1716 Merritt Blvd. Information: 410-887-7255. mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com
NEWS
By Tribune Newspapers | October 6, 2009
Vaccines to help people recover from such addictions as nicotine, cocaine, heroin and methamphetamines appear scientifically and medically achievable after doctors reported Monday that a vaccine to treat cocaine dependence had produced a large enough antibody response to reduce cocaine use in 38 percent of addicted individuals. Those results come on the heels of last week's announcement that the federal government will fund a large clinical trial of a nicotine vaccine based on earlier promising studies.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | May 18, 2009
From a distance, it looks like Tal Broustin is lighting up a cigarette, right in the middle of Arundel Mills, a clear no-no. And he is trying to get others to take drags, too, luring passersby to his kiosk by asking if they are trying to quit smoking. Up close, it is clear that Broustin is taking puffs not from an actual cigarette, but from a battery-powered gadget designed to look like the real thing. Called an "e-cigarette," or electronic cigarette, it contains no tobacco, gives off no smoke but instead is a nicotine delivery device that gives off heated water vapor.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun reporter | February 5, 2008
Smokers who have long been harangued about the medical consequences of their habit have a new one to ponder: It might be harming their sleep. A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine found that smokers are four times as likely as nonsmokers to report trouble sleeping and feeling rested the next day. Measurements of brain activity showed that they aren't experiencing as much deep sleep during the night, a possible side effect of...
FEATURES
By Mary Beckman | January 3, 2008
It's the time of year when people resolve to make changes in their lives. And we probably all know someone -- it might even be ourselves -- who vowed to quit smoking. We also all know someone who stopped for a few days then lit back up. Here's a closer look at one of the most difficult resolutions to keep: "I vow to quit smoking." According to a 2006 report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 41 percent of smokers try to quit at least once during the year. But only about 10 percent actually succeed.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | December 19, 2007
While the last cigarette won't go out in a Baltimore bar for two more months, some city bar owners have been hard at work, looking for ways to follow the statewide ban without forcing smokers - some of their most loyal customers - out onto the street. From Fells Point to Mount Vernon, club owners are investing in expensive gas heaters, installing weatherproof tents and refurbishing decks and patios for year-round use. Although others are taking a wait-and-see approach, they know it will be anything but business as usual when the ban takes effect in February.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1997
A colorless, oily liquid used widely as an insecticide, it is fatal to humans in a large dose.Yet nicotine's extraordinary power over the human psyche has shaped history. Export of that exotic New World weed Nicotiana tabacum turned Colonial America into a trading power. Later, nicotine's addictive grip helped build the cigarette industry into a commercial and political colossus.Now the biochemistry of nicotine is a key to the lawsuits that have forced Big Tobacco to bargain with its foes.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2004
Is tobacco about to meet its match? New insights into how nicotine behaves in the body are paving the way for better drugs to help smokers beat their addiction, researchers reported this week at the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists' annual meeting in Baltimore. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 70 percent of the nation's 46 million smokers say they want to quit. But fewer than 5 percent of those who go cold turkey manage to stay nicotine-free.
NEWS
May 16, 2007
Baltimore residents who wish to quit smoking can obtain free nicotine patches or gum - as well as free telephone counseling sessions with experienced smoking-cessation experts - under a program coordinated by the Baltimore City Health Department. The patches and gum can be obtained by calling 800-QUIT-NOW. The service is funded by the state and run by Free and Clear. The city's share of Maryland's tobacco control program is paying for the nicotine replacement therapy, according to health officials.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 28, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration should be able to limit nicotine levels in cigarettes, as well as require stronger health warnings on packages and in advertising, legislators considering a bill to allow the agency to regulate tobacco products were told by experts yesterday. "FDA regulation will help us to combat the vicious marketing practices of a deceptive industry that has preyed upon our children, minorities and existing smokers who are desperately trying to kick their habit," Dr. Elmer Huerta, the incoming president of the American Cancer Society, told the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pension Committee.
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