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By PHILIP MOELLER and PHILIP MOELLER,SUN BUSINESS EDITOR | October 9, 1991
Are you ready for some football?With the Orioles' season over, Memorial Stadium officially designated a relic, and the politically correct name for the new field finally decided, it's time to move on to that other great pastime of grown-up male children -- pro football.In the business community, this means turning our attention to the city's chances of winning one of the two precious expansion slots up for grabs in the National Football League. This is no idle topic among grown-up male children because common wisdom does not place Baltimore among the top two candidates for a new franchise.
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SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | October 14, 1993
IRVING, Texas -- When NFL owners decide on expansion franchises later this month, their vote -- at least the first one -- apparently will be on a two-city package.The seemingly mundane procedural matter, decided at a meeting yesterday of two NFL ownership committees, could have significant implications for Baltimore's hopes of rejoining the league.The city's candidacy -- which features a strong financial package -- is generally given its highest marks when viewed apart from the other cities.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | November 1, 1993
So strong is their desire to own a National Football League franchise in Baltimore that Malcolm Glazer & Sons made an offer that seemingly couldn't be refused. Yet it was quickly discarded. The dollars were right; the premise wrong.What the Glazers proposed was to give each visiting team coming to Baltimore an astonishing $1.5 million per game, which would qualify as a record in take-home pay for any sport. It'smore than double, almost triple, the going rate for playing an NFL game on the road.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | March 20, 1992
PHOENIX -- Commissioner Paul Tagliabue is now going to try to convince the NFL owners that less is really more.Tagliabue closed the annual March meetings yesterday by putting the immediate focus on a special meeting he has called for March 30 in Dallas to discuss giving the television networks a rebate for 1993 in return for a two-year extension of their contract in 1994-95."
NEWS
October 28, 1993
It's not over till it's over. Mayor Kurt Schmoke invoked the old cliche Tuesday night after the National Football League put off a decision on the second new franchise. He's right. It may be third down and 20 to go with the clock running out. But winning touchdowns have been scored in the last seconds, and that can happen in this competition.Perhaps not even the NFL owners know all the reasons they awarded one of the new teams to Charlotte but failed to agree on the other. Probably there was a mixed bag of reasons.
NEWS
January 24, 1992
Saturday is D-Day for Baltimore-area sports fans, the day when they get to show how determined they are to win a new National Football League franchise for this town. If they quickly gobble up all of the 58,000 seats that go on sale tomorrow for a late-summer NFL exhibition game, a strong message will have been delivered to NFL owners that Baltimore is ready, eager and more than able to support a professional football team once more.It has been eight long years since the last NFL game at Memorial Stadium.
SPORTS
October 24, 1991
NFL owners vote to continue WLAFNFL owners voted last night in Dallas to continue operating the World League of American Football and agreed to a three-year television contract with both the USA network and ABC that would air 35 regular-season and two playoff games and next spring's World Bowl.Dan Rooney, chairman of WLAF board of directors, said 10 teams will compete, including holdovers London; Barcelona, Spain; Frankfurt, Germany; Montreal; New York; Birmingham, Ala.; San Antonio; Orlando, Fla.; and Sacramento, Calif.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | October 31, 1993
One fan suggests a Baltimore fan parachute into an NFL stadium during a game.Another suggests appealing to NationsBank chairman Hugh McColl, who is influential in league circles.And local McDonald's restaurants have made plans to hand oupostcards for customers to fill out and mail to the NFL.Baltimore isn't taking its brush-off from the NFL lightly. Fans are writing, calling and faxing ideas to everyone involved with the effort to return football to the city."I am inundated with wonderful people who care," said Maryland Stadium Authority chairman Herbert J. Belgrad.
SPORTS
By Bloomberg News | July 15, 2011
Negotiators for the NFL and its players are near an agreement on rookie pay, clearing a major obstacle toward reaching a new labor accord and reopening football a week before training camps are scheduled to start, three people familiar with the talks said. Rookie pay dominated negotiations this week after the sides neared a deal on how to divide a projected $9.3 billion in revenue that would give just less than half to players, according to the people, who were granted anonymity because they weren't authorized to discuss the talks publicly.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2011
Based on an apparent email from their union representatives to the players, labor peace in the NFL likely won't be reached this weekend. The memo, which was obtained by ESPN, informed players that they won't talk again until Monday to discuss "the direction we want to go. " NFL Players' Association officials later said no conference call or meeting was scheduled for Monday and that leaders planned to work through the weekend. Meanwhile, NFL owners have set a Tuesday deadline for the players to recertify as a union and agree to the proposed 10-year collective bargaining agreement.
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