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By Vito Stellino | May 30, 1991
Despite the NFL's setback in court Tuesday, commissioner Paul Tagliabue is moving ahead with the expansion process.Yesterday Tagliabue named the final three members of the expansion committee that he will chair, and he announced that the committee will hold its first meeting in July.The three new members are Hugh Culverhouse of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Rankin Smith of the Atlanta Falcons and Alex Spanos of the San Diego Chargers.Smith and Spanos have rarely played a key role in league issues, but Tagliabue has said he wants to get more owners involved in league affairs.
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SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2002
The Houston Texans performed their salary cap relief work as expected yesterday, bailing out fiscally troubled NFL teams like the Jacksonville Jaguars, New York Jets and Ravens. But by the time the Texans closed down a $40 million-plus expansion shopping spree, they proved to be much more than goodwill ambassadors. That was no rummage sale, and this is no pushover expansion team. The Texans poured an impressive foundation with yesterday's expansion draft. General manager Charley Casserly had identified four positions as the toughest to fill for a new team - cornerback, offensive line, defensive line and quarterback - and then proceeded to do a masterful job filling at least three of them.
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SPORTS
By John Steadman | September 17, 1990
As Bob Tisch turned into a weekend tourist and walked the streets of Baltimore, looking in at Harborplace, he was impressed with the nautical motif. Knowing the city's link to the world is involved with its maritime presence, he kept reflecting upon his most auspicious ambition -- the football team he hopes to see playing here in 1993.Tisch is standing in line hoping to be recognized among a list of possible franchise owners if and when Baltimore is selected as one of two NFL expansion teams named for play in 1993.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1999
PHOENIX -- The last time the NFL had an expansion derby, in 1995, it selected two small markets -- Carolina and Jacksonville -- with good stadium deals.Now it wants to expand to a big market -- Los Angeles -- with no stadium deal.Nobody ever accused the NFL of being consistent, but NFL officials have yet to get 24 votes for their Los Angeles plan at the annual March meetings this week.The problem is that Los Angeles doesn't have a stadium financing plan and a single site or owner.Houston has all three, but it's the 11th largest TV market and Los Angeles is the second largest market.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | September 10, 1991
There's been a reshuffling of the lineup within one of th groups that has been vying for a position in the race as it prepares to file an application for an expansion franchise in the National Football League. Bart Starr, the universally respected Hall of Fame quarterback of the Green Bay Packers, believes the city's interests can best be served if he assumes a more passive role.Starr, though, is not withdrawing. Two heavy investors he was counting on to become the point-men in the effort have told him that because of a decline in their real estate holdings, they would not be able to accompany him in the Baltimore project, which is a disappointment.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | March 12, 1992
The NFL is still moving slowly and cautiously on the expansion issue.Although an NFL spokesman said in a conference call with writers that the owners will make "some reduction of cities" in the expansion pool Tuesday at the annual March meeting in Phoenix, they still won't set a price tag on the two expansion franchises at this meeting. The league earlier indicated it might set a price when it cut the field.Joe Browne, the league's vice president of communications and development, also declined to say how many cities will survive this cut although one owner, who didn't want to be identified, has said the field will be narrowed from 10 to six cities.
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman | October 8, 1990
Let's see, what do we really know about the National Football League's plans for expansion?We know there are tentative plans, announced last summer by NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue, to add two or more teams for the 1993 season.We know the cities that are chosen will be in North America. (In the ultra-secret world of NFL expansion, this actually is considered a scoop.)We can be fairly certain that whatever cities are chosen, others will complain that they have been overlooked unfairly and will call immediately for the league to expand again by between two and 24 more teams.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino | October 1, 1991
The Baltimore NFL expansion derby is down to three owner finalists -- businessmen Malcolm Glazer and Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass and author Tom Clancy.They are the three groups who have sent in their applications to the NFL along with a $100,000 filing fee. The deadline for filing is today."The race is on," Clancy said.Although Baltimore may be the only one of the 11 contending cities with more than one owner group, Bryan Glazer, one of Malcolm's sons, said: "This brings attention to the city, which is a plus for everybody.
SPORTS
By From Staff Reports | May 20, 1992
For the five finalists in the NFL expansion derby -- including Baltimore -- the waiting will continue.They'll still have to wait to find out whether the league will stick to its timetable of naming two new teams this fall to play in 1994.After the NFL owners dropped Sacramento, Calif., and Oakland, Calif., from the list of expansion hopefuls at their annual spring meeting in Pasadena, Calif., yesterday to cut the field to five cities, commissioner Paul Tagliabue said he still doesn't know if the league will expand this fall.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | October 24, 1993
Unless you're lucky enough to own a sports bar across the street from the new stadium or land the hot dog concession for the games, don't look for riches to flow if Baltimore is awarded a new NFL team.Certain industries, such as tourism, would prosper, but many would not. Restaurants near the stadium will pick up business before and after games, but those farther away could lose as families redirect spending. Newspapers would gain as fans drink up coverage of the team, but the Orioles and Spirit would find themselves in new competition for season tickets.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan | October 26, 1997
He's said it so often that many have come to dismiss it as the old chief executive's paranoid rambling.It was the Redskins' fault, says former Gov. William Donald Schaefer. The Redskins and their owner, Jack Kent Cooke, delivered him one of his most stinging rebukes. Cooke and National Football league Commissioner Paul Tagliabue conspired against Baltimore and cost us the expansion franchise that rightfully should have been ours.As daffy as it sounds, Schaefer might be right. The state's expansion strategy had its flaws.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | February 16, 1995
Reading Time: Two Minutes.OK, Carolina and Jacksonville, you've got $14 million worth of players apiece, now what? What made yesterday's expansion draft for the Panthers and Jaguars strange is they had to spend $14 million in salaries with their pool selections. Like the entry fee wasn't mind-blowing enough.Jax coach Tom Coughlin's suggestion that only 12 of his team's 31 picks would make the team makes one wonder why he didn't pull a Paul Richards. Tall Paul, involved in a baseball expansion while working in Houston, looked at the list of availables and tossed it back, saying, "No way. Put some players on there."
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Sun Staff Writer | February 15, 1995
The NFL's two expansion teams will have trouble finding any nuggets today when they sift through the sand of the league's first stocking draft in 19 years.Carolina and Jacksonville can choose up to 84 -- a maximum of 42 each -- of the 168 players the 28 existing teams have left exposed, but they're not likely to select many more than 30 they're required to take."We have to be very much aware of the financial aspect of our picks," said Tom Coughlin, the Jacksonville coach.That means they're responsible for any prorated share of signing bonuses left in the contracts of the players they select, even if they eventually cut them.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | December 9, 1994
What might have been the winning combination -- Clancy & Robinson -- never fully functioned in a total game-plan concept in behalf of Baltimore's quest for a NFL expansion franchise. It was a case of supporting the wrong ticket . . . Malcolm Glazer, Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass and then, with the decisive 11th hour at hand, the presence of Al Lerner. That correlates to 0-for-3.Tom Clancy and Jim Robinson were in it together as an early entry, despite the fact Herbert Belgrad, chairman of the Maryland Stadium Authority, wasn't enamored with their presence, especially thhat of Clancy, one of the most successful authors in the world who had been a fanatic of the Baltimore Colts.
SPORTS
October 21, 1994
RAMS: 1,835STAY OUT: 1,930BUCCANEERS: 638You want an NFL team, but you also want the league to know what you think of it.That's the result of the It's Your Call Poll conducted last week via Sundial, The Baltimore Sun's telephone information service. We asked you if you wanted the Los Angeles Rams or Tampa Bay Buccaneers to move to Baltimore or favored no NFL, team at all.Among the 4,403 respondents, 2,473 (about 56 percent wanted one of the two teams and 1,930 (about 44 percent) wanted the NFL to stay out. And among those who want an NFL team, the Rams were the choice, 1,835-638.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY | August 7, 1994
There's one born every minute, it seems.Pro football leagues, that is.Working on the premise there is always room for one more, a former United States Football League executive is attempting to bring the North American Football League to the U.S. in 1995.Steve Ehrhart, who served as director of administration for the long-gone USFL and more recently as William Dunavant's right-hand man in Memphis' bid for an NFL expansion team, is chairman of a five-man executive council for the prenatal NAFL.
SPORTS
By Al Dunning and Al Dunning,The Commercial Appeal | October 20, 1993
MEMPHIS, Tenn. -- Top this, Charlotte; run this through your Gateway Arch, St. Louis: score tied, 30 seconds to play, home team's ball, first-and-goal at the 5-yard line and a sellout crowd of 68,000 Elvis impersonators howling, "It's now or never . . . "Now running the anchor leg for Memphis in the five-city NFL expansion sweepstakes, the maxijillionaire spirit of Elvis Presley.Beale Street, the world's best barbecue and Graceland. How's that for a Memphis Trilogy? Surely, NFL owners cannot possibly be cruel to so favored a city.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | October 1, 1993
Remember Sept. 3?That was the absolute, inviolable, non-negotiable deadline facing the five cities trying to lure an NFL expansion team. By that date, they were to stop selling sky boxes and premium seats as part of a league-designed, two-month test marketing campaign.Baltimore started on the scheduled July 1 kickoff and sold out about a week before the deadline. Charlotte, N.C., geared up weeks in advance, but accepted no checks before July 1 or after the Labor Day weekend. Jacksonville, Fla., and Memphis, Tenn.
NEWS
By JACK GILDEN | February 2, 1994
Living the bachelor's life, I tumbled out of bed late a couple of Saturdays ago and walked out into the bitter January air, a sharp beard bristling from my face and breakfast on my mind. Arriving at the Grand Opening of the new Super Fresh on 41st Street, I found myself in a virtual mob wedged next to Mayor Schmoke.His Honor was cutting ribbons, smiling blankly and shaking hands with eager patrons. When he turned toward me, I responded like any good Hampdenite; I bored him. ''Nice to meet you Mr. Mayor,'' I murmured.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | December 1, 1993
Lust was the current that ran our years-long infatuation with NFL expansion. Lust for another home team. Lust for another experience as joyful as the Orioles playing in Camden Yards. Lust for a reconjuring of our vivid football memories.So powerful was the lust that, even in the final hours yesterday, after a process as demeaning as any ever perpetrated by a pro sports league, we still wanted their ball. Their suffocatingly arrogant ball.Today, after another jilting, this time in favor of a minor-league town that once tried to steal the Colts, I feel safe in speaking for an entire angry city: We don't want it anymore.
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