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By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Sun Staff Writer | April 24, 1995
ASHBURN, Va. -- For Rob Johnson, Chad May and John Walsh, big-name quarterbacks from big-name schools, it was a day of disappointment.For Rich Owens, an unheralded defensive lineman from a school noted more for academics than football, it was a day for celebration.Those are the typical reactions on the second day of the NFL draft, when the players who thought they were going higher wonder what went wrong and the players who thought they might not be drafted are thrilled to get selected.Southern Cal's Johnson, Kansas State's May and Brigham Young's Walsh hoped to go high in the draft.
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SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY and KEN MURRAY,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2004
The University of Miami and the 2004 class of wide receivers set records in the NFL draft yesterday. The Hurricanes had six first-round selections, breaking the record of five they had in 2002 and shared with Southern California (1968). There were seven wide receivers taken in the first round, topping the previous high of five set in 1988 and matched in 2001. Altogether there were 19 offensive picks in the first round, most in the past 15 years. 1. CHARGERS* Philip Rivers, QB, North Carolina State The Chargers wanted to trade back all along and take Rivers.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | April 19, 2011
The first round of the 2011 NFL draft takes place in New York City next Thursday with plenty of uncertainty and intrigue -- and indifference from some disenchanted fans -- as the football freeze unthaws for draft weekend. It will be interesting to see how the draft unfolds during the lockout. Usually, free agency takes place before the draft, but not this year, so draft philosophies will be changed. Players can't be traded, so that could cut down on the number of trades. And with a rookie wage scale likely to be in place post-lockout, teams might be willing to gamble on high-risk players since it won't cost them as much to roll the dice.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY | April 10, 2005
For reasons both economic and practical, it will be a buyer's market when the NFL draft unfolds April 23. Indeed, it figures to be easier to trade up into the top 10 picks of the first round than to slide out of them. In a draft that is short on impact players, several teams already have expressed a willingness to vacate the high-rent district. The San Francisco 49ers are prepared to begin negotiations with four players but have invited offers for their No. 1 pick. The Miami Dolphins have been shopping No. 2 for weeks.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | April 28, 1992
There were 336 stories in the NFL's 57th collegiate draft, which rang to a close yesterday after the 28 teams made 22 trades during the 17 hours, 34 minutes and 12 rounds of sometimes frantic deliberating.Actually, make that at least 337 stories.One of the best stories of the draft may involve quarterback Boomer Esiason of the Cincinnati Bengals, the former University of Maryland star who was a big draft-day story eight years ago when he wasn't selected until the second round.Esiason wasn't happy about the slight, and he got the last laugh on the critics when he led the Bengals to the Super Bowl three years ago.Esiason is noted for being outspoken, and he made it obvious yesterday he wasn't happy about the Bengals' selection of quarterback David Klingler.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | April 24, 1992
"The sports page records people's accomplishments," former Supreme Court Chief Justice Earl "The Pearl" Warren once said, "the front page nothing but man's failure."I can well understand how the beleaguered reader turns to his sports section seeking solace from the travails of everyday life. Or at least seeking sentences that don't juxtapose the words solace and travails.In any case, sports journalists believe we also can provide substance. Let pundits ponder peripheral piffle pertaining to potential presidents.
SPORTS
By David Steele | April 26, 2009
LARGO -Aaron Maybin never thought for a second about accepting the NFL's invitation to be on site when his name was called at Radio City Music Hall on Saturday. Not unless the NFL, or somebody else, could figure out a way to fit 500 relatives, friends and extended family members into the building. "I think you can look around and see the kind of support I have in here. Believe me, it was a no-brainer," Maybin said, exhausted but still giddy an hour after his dream came true in the NFL draft.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Staff Writer | May 2, 1993
Pro football fans aren't the only ones who try to predict the NFL draft.Trading card manufacturers engage in this game, too.For the fourth straight year, a card manufacturer was at the NFL draft in New York with a card of the first player chosen.This year, Classic Games Inc. did the honors and, when Drew Bledsoe was chosen first, whipped out cards showing the quarterback in his Washington State uniform and a vertical strip with his name and that of the New England Patriots."Similar to many fans across the country, we held our breath before the No. 1 pick was announced," says Classic's Seth Toporek.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | April 28, 2006
This weekend marks ESPN's 27th time televising the NFL draft. So I don't care how well you argued for your high school debate team, the discussion about the logic and the wisdom of devoting so much air time to this exercise in pick-'em-up has been closed for a while. More people probably know who Mel Kiper Jr. is than they do Kenneth Lay. (I think Kiper has Lay going in the seventh round to the Arizona Cardinals.) "If there's any event that typifies how far we've come as a company, it's the NFL draft," John Wildhack, ESPN senior vice president, said in a conference call this week.
SPORTS
April 25, 2006
There's life after Ray, and it's time to start preparing. Everything about the Ravens' offseason maneuvering indicates team officials sought instant fixes that would help the team compete immediately. In this weekend's NFL draft, though, the Ravens need to show foresight that extends beyond the 2006 season. Time for the Ravens to get their affairs in order. Ray Lewis won't be around forever. And the time to start addressing that reality is the first round of this year's draft. The Ravens apparently don't think they can upgrade their offensive line Saturday.
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