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News Director

FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 5, 1996
David Roberts, who led WBAL News in a remarkable turnaround from worst to a contender for first place in ratings, is leaving the station to become news director at WXIA-TV in Atlanta.Roberts, 39, will be the first African-American news director for a network affiliate in Atlanta television history when he joins WXIA on Jan. 21. He took over the newsroom at WBAL in 1992."The fact that I'm African-American and the fact that I'm going to be the first are definitely significant," Roberts said yesterday.
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 19, 1998
ABC News has done such a "horrendous" job of covering major events in Washington and Baghdad this week that the network apologized to its affiliates, according to a message sent to news directors at stations affiliated with ABC.Chuck Samuels, news director at WOKR-TV, the ABC affiliate in Rochester, N.Y., contacted his colleagues at other ABC stations in the northeast late Thursday after talking with network news officials in his capacity as a member of...
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | July 18, 2001
WMAR-TV news director Staci Feger-Childers is naturally buoyant, and while she's doing rapid-fire run-through of the day's stories, she is trying very, very hard to sit still. Her station doesn't have that luxury. Feger-Childers, 34, came to Baltimore six months ago, and she's been taking stock ever since. Here's what she sees: a station whose newscasts are mired at the bottom of the Baltimore market. WMAR has an experienced and capable staff that's been demoralized by a series of short-lived, low-impact news directors.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2001
It was an ugly beginning to a beautiful All-American evening of wife-carrying in Timonium. Inside the State Fairground's Cow Palace - amid notices for the "Junior Angus Show" and "Heifer Competition" - 50 couples competed Thursday night in Maryland's first Wife-Carrying Contest. But before the teams dodged the first course cone or horse fertilizer, a radio station promotions director broke a leg after she and her partner fell at, on and over the finish line. The crowd thought it was a harmless fall.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | February 14, 2001
After more than four years in Baltimore, WJZ reporter Kathy Fowler was fired by the station earlier this month, to the surprise and dismay of colleagues. Fowler was one of the few journalists at the station who reveled in shaking loose new elements of stories that sparked strong public interest. "I just was astounded that they would let her go," said Mindy Basara, a reporter at rival WBAL. "She's a great reporter, aggressive, with a hard-news take on stories. I was never happy to see her on a story I was covering, because that meant the competition was there."
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | February 28, 2001
If crowing rights in the local television world are to be had after February yields to March, they'll likely belong to WBAL (Channel 11). The NBC affiliate appears to have edged longtime Baltimore favorite WJZ (Channel 13) for top ratings of news shows at 5 p.m., 6 p.m., and 11 p.m., considered the marquee events. That's the first time in a very long time - more than a decade - that a station other than WJZ has swept the evening and late night newscasts two ratings periods in a row. Let me say from the outset that I loathe the ratings period, which fosters increasingly elaborate explanations from TV types about how good their ratings are - no matter what the numbers say. You can find less spin in a laundromat.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | November 12, 2001
Longtime WMAR news anchor Stan Stovall is being dismissed by the Baltimore station when his contract lapses at the end of December. WMAR general manager Drew Berry and news director Staci Feger-Childers would not discuss the decision other than to praise Stovall's professionalism, saying the move is a personnel matter. But the two officials acknowledge they are taking a series of steps to try to reverse the fortunes of the consistently third-rated station. "I definitely will be leaving," Stovall said late Friday.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | April 24, 2008
Listen to your body. Get a doctor you really like and trust. Stop smoking. Jayne Miller smiles and laughs at her newfound mantras, truisms she's learned the hard way during the past two months. Hers is a good, hearty laugh, one that betrays not a hint of anything wrong - she neither looks nor sounds like a woman still recovering from brain surgery. Sitting on a picnic bench outside WBAL's TV Hill studios on a warm April afternoon, she seems as energetic and straightforward as ever, every inch the hard-driving investigative reporter who has been chasing after lying pols and corrupt businessmen for nearly three decades.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2004
Two anchors from WBAL-TV are leaving their jobs, part of a series of unrelated shifts at the top-rated Baltimore news station. Morning news anchor Marilyn Getas will be replaced by Mindy Basara, a reporter and weekend morning anchor who has been with WBAL-TV since 1998. Absent the opportunity to move into a more prominent anchor slot here, Getas said she would have preferred to stay in her current job. But she could not come to terms with the station on a new contract. Her final day is June 4, and she is pursuing other television news jobs.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | October 8, 1992
For the first time at a Baltimore television station, the writers, producers and assignment editors at WBAL-TV have voted to join a union.For years, most of the anchor people, reporters and camera operators who work on Baltimore television news shows have belonged to unions such as the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists.But last week's vote by 18 behind-the-scenes production assistants and other workers at the station marked the first unionization of the folks who write and organize a news show in Baltimore, said a spokesman for the Writers Guild of America, East, the union that will represent the WBAL workers.
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