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NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Staff writer | July 17, 1991
Management at Prestige Cablevision Channel 3 is going through a major shake-up, with the resignations last week of General Manager Chuck Kunaniec and News Director John C. "Rip" Jeppi Jr.Herschel Wisebram, director of local programming for Prestige Cable in Cartersville,Ga., cited "philosophical differences" behind Kunaniec's resignationJuly 9."He served us well for a number of years and deserves credit for the station's expansion and improvement in programming," Wisebram said."But there were some philosophical differences in the way I wanted things run and the way he wanted to do them."
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 5, 1996
David Roberts, who led WBAL News in a remarkable turnaround from worst to a contender for first place in ratings, is leaving the station to become news director at WXIA-TV in Atlanta.Roberts, 39, will be the first African-American news director for a network affiliate in Atlanta television history when he joins WXIA on Jan. 21. He took over the newsroom at WBAL in 1992."The fact that I'm African-American and the fact that I'm going to be the first are definitely significant," Roberts said yesterday.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | July 18, 2001
WMAR-TV news director Staci Feger-Childers is naturally buoyant, and while she's doing rapid-fire run-through of the day's stories, she is trying very, very hard to sit still. Her station doesn't have that luxury. Feger-Childers, 34, came to Baltimore six months ago, and she's been taking stock ever since. Here's what she sees: a station whose newscasts are mired at the bottom of the Baltimore market. WMAR has an experienced and capable staff that's been demoralized by a series of short-lived, low-impact news directors.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | April 24, 2008
Listen to your body. Get a doctor you really like and trust. Stop smoking. Jayne Miller smiles and laughs at her newfound mantras, truisms she's learned the hard way during the past two months. Hers is a good, hearty laugh, one that betrays not a hint of anything wrong - she neither looks nor sounds like a woman still recovering from brain surgery. Sitting on a picnic bench outside WBAL's TV Hill studios on a warm April afternoon, she seems as energetic and straightforward as ever, every inch the hard-driving investigative reporter who has been chasing after lying pols and corrupt businessmen for nearly three decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2011
Oprah Winfrey is one great storyteller. So let her set the stage for the story of her years in Baltimore - seven and a half years starting in 1976 that would profoundly shape not only the life of the young anchorwoman, but also give birth to the media phenomenon known as Oprah. "I came to Baltimore when I was 22 years old. Drove my red Cutlass up from Nashville, Tenn., arrived and was as close to 'The Beverly Hillbillies' as I could be," Winfrey says in that rich, inviting voice that millions have tuned in to for decades.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | February 14, 2001
After more than four years in Baltimore, WJZ reporter Kathy Fowler was fired by the station earlier this month, to the surprise and dismay of colleagues. Fowler was one of the few journalists at the station who reveled in shaking loose new elements of stories that sparked strong public interest. "I just was astounded that they would let her go," said Mindy Basara, a reporter at rival WBAL. "She's a great reporter, aggressive, with a hard-news take on stories. I was never happy to see her on a story I was covering, because that meant the competition was there."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 11, 1996
LONDON -- It's the telephone call that can freeze an entire news room: The Irish Republican Army is on the line.But how is a journalist supposed to know it's really the IRA?The caller utters a recognized code, known to media and police. It confirms that the IRA is going to do something terrifying, or take responsibility for something that's already happened.The IRA holds no press conferences.Its unique form of terrorist confirmation was put into play again after Monday's double car bomb attack on Northern Ireland's most heavily secured area, the British army headquarters in Lisburn.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2004
Two anchors from WBAL-TV are leaving their jobs, part of a series of unrelated shifts at the top-rated Baltimore news station. Morning news anchor Marilyn Getas will be replaced by Mindy Basara, a reporter and weekend morning anchor who has been with WBAL-TV since 1998. Absent the opportunity to move into a more prominent anchor slot here, Getas said she would have preferred to stay in her current job. But she could not come to terms with the station on a new contract. Her final day is June 4, and she is pursuing other television news jobs.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | November 12, 2001
Longtime WMAR news anchor Stan Stovall is being dismissed by the Baltimore station when his contract lapses at the end of December. WMAR general manager Drew Berry and news director Staci Feger-Childers would not discuss the decision other than to praise Stovall's professionalism, saying the move is a personnel matter. But the two officials acknowledge they are taking a series of steps to try to reverse the fortunes of the consistently third-rated station. "I definitely will be leaving," Stovall said late Friday.
FEATURES
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | November 14, 2006
When he was a kid, not yet in his teens, Frank Luber would sneak into a small auditorium at St. Joseph's Monastery in Irvington, point a spotlight toward the center of the stage and stand in its glow. Then, before an empty hall, he'd belt out a song into the microphone. "I guess there was something of the ham in me," Luber said with a chuckle as he recalled those times. "I just liked the feel of it -- showbiz, the stage." Luber, whose first real gig in front of a microphone, not long afterward, involved calling bingo numbers, is celebrating 50 years of broadcasting in Maryland, where his sonorous voice has become a perennial presence on both radio and television.
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