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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2011
Veteran Baltimore newsman Mark Miller is leaving WBAL radio after more than 31 years at the station. As news director for 21 of those years at WBAL, Miller led one of the most competitive and ambitious radio news operations in the country. The station was recently rewarded for its efforts with another national Murrow Award. The 52-year-old journalist said changes in his family life in recent years, which have led to him now commuting be out of state on a regular basis, are partially responsible for the decision to leave WBAL.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore sun | August 13, 2013
Miri Marshall, a weathercaster at KCEN-TV in central Texas, will join WBAL-TV Aug. 22, as part of the station's weather team, general manager Dan Joerres said Tuesday. Marshall fills a role that became vacant when meterologist John Collins retired as a full-time staffer at the end of May, after 24 years at the station. Collins still has a freelance relationship with WBAL-TV, according to Joerres. "Miri has a lot of personality, a lot of energy on-air," Joerres said Tuesday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore sun | August 13, 2013
Miri Marshall, a weathercaster at KCEN-TV in central Texas, will join WBAL-TV Aug. 22, as part of the station's weather team, general manager Dan Joerres said Tuesday. Marshall fills a role that became vacant when meterologist John Collins retired as a full-time staffer at the end of May, after 24 years at the station. Collins still has a freelance relationship with WBAL-TV, according to Joerres. "Miri has a lot of personality, a lot of energy on-air," Joerres said Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2013
Stephen Janis definitely took a path less traveled to the world of TV news. For one thing, he was already 47 years old when he got his first full-time TV job. And at that age, he had virtually no TV training or experience - had never even written a script. He had produced songs like the 1996 chart-topper “Let Me Clear My Throat” for the rapper DJ Kool, played on and scored parts of the soundtrack for John Waters' “Cecil B. Demented,” done first-rate reporting for the Baltimore Examiner, founded the Investigative Voice website and served as a substitute radio host for Ed Norris.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2011
Theodore R. "Ted" Jaffee, a veteran broadcaster whose career in both local radio and TV spanned nearly 40 years, died Monday from complications of a stroke at Aston Gardens, a Naples, Fla., assisted-living facility. The former Lutherville resident was 92. "Ted was probably the classiest person I ever worked with. He was the consummate professional," said Johnny Dark, legendary Baltimore radio personality, who worked with Mr. Jaffee at WCAO. "There was no ego, and he was warm and friendly.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2011
WBAL radio has signed Mary Beth Marsden as the new anchor of its "Afternoon News Journal. " She will start Sept. 6 at the news/talk station's afternoon drivetime anchor desk. The former anchorwoman for WMAR-TV replaces Shari Elliker whom the station dropped last week when it declined to offer her a new contract. Marsden, a fixture on Baltimore TV for two decades, is sure to bring a heightened prominence to WBAL's afternoon drivetime news program -- as well as a veteran sense of news judgment.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2011
The cryptic email went out this week to some of the region's news media — including WMAR-TV and The Baltimore Sun — asking journalists to appear before the city's grand jury, which plans to spend the next few months analyzing the impact of crime coverage on efforts to end violence. It's a sort of term project squeezed in between criminal indictments, and a decades-old tradition for the panel. In addition to evaluating state's evidence, the 23 grand jurors in the city also examine a social issue during their four-month tenure and make recommendations for change.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2012
Ronald A. Stratton, who boosted ratings and transformed radio stations he managed, died of complications from a stroke June 29 at Madonna Heritage Assisted Living in Jarrettsville. He was 72 and lived in Red Lion, Pa. Born in Detroit, he broke into broadcasting in 1955 when his high school guidance counselor offered him credit if he would assist a local weekly children's TV show in Manton, Mich. "He wrote and typed scripts and was the cameraman," said his daughter, Barbara Stratton of Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2013
Washington's WUSA and Baltimore's WBFF were the top news stations in their respective markets at the 55th Emmy Awards of the National Capital/Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. The awards ceremony was held Saturday night in Baltimore. WUSA won 11 regional Emmys, including two for Lesli Foster in the categories of best anchor and best consumer news series. Reporter Andrea McCarren won five Emmys for categories ranging from best single crime story to best serious report feature news.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
If you want to get a real sense of a TV newsroom's priorities and values beyond all the "we're on your side" hype, check it out in times of stress. Stress is defined here as major stories breaking or unfolding at a time when there is an extra emphasis on ratings performance - and not enough cameras and bodies to cover all of the waterfront. Last week in Baltimore certainly qualifies, with two major trials under way at the downtown courthouse, the police commissioner resigning and the Ravens NFL Defensive Player of the Year tearing his Achilles tendon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2013
Washington's WUSA and Baltimore's WBFF were the top news stations in their respective markets at the 55th Emmy Awards of the National Capital/Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. The awards ceremony was held Saturday night in Baltimore. WUSA won 11 regional Emmys, including two for Lesli Foster in the categories of best anchor and best consumer news series. Reporter Andrea McCarren won five Emmys for categories ranging from best single crime story to best serious report feature news.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2012
Ronald A. Stratton, who boosted ratings and transformed radio stations he managed, died of complications from a stroke June 29 at Madonna Heritage Assisted Living in Jarrettsville. He was 72 and lived in Red Lion, Pa. Born in Detroit, he broke into broadcasting in 1955 when his high school guidance counselor offered him credit if he would assist a local weekly children's TV show in Manton, Mich. "He wrote and typed scripts and was the cameraman," said his daughter, Barbara Stratton of Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
If you want to get a real sense of a TV newsroom's priorities and values beyond all the "we're on your side" hype, check it out in times of stress. Stress is defined here as major stories breaking or unfolding at a time when there is an extra emphasis on ratings performance - and not enough cameras and bodies to cover all of the waterfront. Last week in Baltimore certainly qualifies, with two major trials under way at the downtown courthouse, the police commissioner resigning and the Ravens NFL Defensive Player of the Year tearing his Achilles tendon.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2011
Theodore R. "Ted" Jaffee, a veteran broadcaster whose career in both local radio and TV spanned nearly 40 years, died Monday from complications of a stroke at Aston Gardens, a Naples, Fla., assisted-living facility. The former Lutherville resident was 92. "Ted was probably the classiest person I ever worked with. He was the consummate professional," said Johnny Dark, legendary Baltimore radio personality, who worked with Mr. Jaffee at WCAO. "There was no ego, and he was warm and friendly.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2011
WBAL radio has signed Mary Beth Marsden as the new anchor of its "Afternoon News Journal. " She will start Sept. 6 at the news/talk station's afternoon drivetime anchor desk. The former anchorwoman for WMAR-TV replaces Shari Elliker whom the station dropped last week when it declined to offer her a new contract. Marsden, a fixture on Baltimore TV for two decades, is sure to bring a heightened prominence to WBAL's afternoon drivetime news program -- as well as a veteran sense of news judgment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2011
WBAL radio Monday named Merrie Street as news director replacing Mark Miller, who resigned last month. Street, whose resume includes news director and anchor duties at WLIF and WPOC, starts Monday, according to an email from Ed Kiernan, station general manager. "I have to say I was really impressed with her," Kiernan said in a follow-up telephone interview. "WBAL is one of the premier news organizations in the country," Street said in a telephone interview Monday. "This is just a great opportunity and I look so forward to it. " In addition to her career in radio, Street has also been involved in politics running for such offices as Harford County register of wills.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2013
Stephen Janis definitely took a path less traveled to the world of TV news. For one thing, he was already 47 years old when he got his first full-time TV job. And at that age, he had virtually no TV training or experience - had never even written a script. He had produced songs like the 1996 chart-topper “Let Me Clear My Throat” for the rapper DJ Kool, played on and scored parts of the soundtrack for John Waters' “Cecil B. Demented,” done first-rate reporting for the Baltimore Examiner, founded the Investigative Voice website and served as a substitute radio host for Ed Norris.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2011
Veteran Baltimore newsman Mark Miller is leaving WBAL radio after more than 31 years at the station. As news director for 21 of those years at WBAL, Miller led one of the most competitive and ambitious radio news operations in the country. The station was recently rewarded for its efforts with another national Murrow Award. The 52-year-old journalist said changes in his family life in recent years, which have led to him now commuting be out of state on a regular basis, are partially responsible for the decision to leave WBAL.
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