Advertisement
HomeCollectionsNew York City
IN THE NEWS

New York City

NEWS
By Anthony Landi, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Nick Millhiser and Alex Frankel have the uncanny ability to write songs with heavy themes and danceable grooves. "We've always liked stuff that can feel kind of fun and carefree from a production standpoint, but lyrically not have to be totally innocuous, like New Order, Depeche Mode or even LCD Soundsystem," said Millhiser over the phone last Thursday. "On the last record, the song 'Jam for Jerry' was about a really good friend of ours who passed away," he said. "The only way we could've tackled that song lyrically was with something that wasn't so melancholy, brooding or on the nose with the subject matter.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Anthony Landi, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Nick Millhiser and Alex Frankel have the uncanny ability to write songs with heavy themes and danceable grooves. “We've always liked stuff that can feel kind of fun and carefree from a production standpoint, but lyrically not have to be totally innocuous, like New Order, Depeche Mode or even LCD Soundsystem,” said Millhiser over the phone last Thursday. “On the last record, the song 'Jam for Jerry' was about a really good friend of ours who passed away,” he said. “The only way we could've tackled that song lyrically was with something that wasn't so melancholy, brooding or on the nose with the subject matter.” The two lifelong friends make up the Brooklyn-based synthpop group Holy Ghost!
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | October 25, 2013
Under Armour is taking its Brand House specialty store concept to the Big Apple. The Baltimore-based sports apparel brand launched the new retail format in February with a store in Harbor East, and this week set a Nov. 7 opening date for a previously announced location in Tysons Corner Center in Virginia. The apparel and footwear powerhouse is not stopping there. Plans are in the works to bring the first Under Armour specialty store to New York City. Under Armour founder and CEO Kevin Plank briefly mentioned the new store on a conference call Thursday when the company released its third quarter earnings.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
On Oct. 13, just before 9:15 a.m., Tatyana McFadden soared across the finish line at the Bank of America Chicago Marathon, just two seconds before the racer behind her, taking the top spot in the women's wheelchair competition and making history. McFadden, 24, an Atholton High School graduate who grew up in Clarksville, completed the marathon in 1 hour, 42 minutes and 35 seconds, about a three-minute improvement over her first-place times in the Boston and London marathons earlier this year.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Atlantic Coast Conference commissioner John Swofford said at a news conference on Wednesday that playing a men's basketball tournament in  New York City sometime in the near future is possible, and that Washington is still on the league's radar as a potential tournament site despite Maryland's departure after this season. "I wouldn't want to handicap that, but without a doubt New York City is prominent part of our footprint," Swofford said. "Any college team knows New York City and there's a particular interest in college basketball there.
NEWS
October 11, 2013
I am writing in response to the editorial, "Charm City Express" (Sept. 16), outlining Gov. Martin O'Malley's plan to increase support for Baltimore's public transportation infrastructure. As a student at Johns Hopkins University coming from New York City, the model of efficient and effective public transportation, I am thrilled with Governor O'Malley's plan. When talking to my peers at Hopkins, everyone agrees that Baltimore is a fantastic city with a lot to explore, but we are frustrated by the lack of a good transit system for us to explore it. Most students don't have a car on campus.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
A tornado watch that had covered much of Maryland and the mid-Atlantic has been canceled, with wet but non-severe weather forecast the rest of Monday. Heavy rain fell across much of the region as a squall line moved through about midday. A light steady rain was expected to continue into the afternoon hours. Weather service forecasters had cautioned isolated tornadoes were possible in areas under the tornado watch. Though the sun's heating typically fuels summertime severe weather, heavy moisture in the air, especially for this time of year, was fueling instability in the atmosphere Monday as cooler, drier air more typical for fall moves in from the northwest.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and By Erica L. Green | October 2, 2013
Former Baltimore city schools CEO Andres Alonso has topped a short list of strong contenders for the schools chancellor seat in New York City. Gotham Schools, a news website that covers New York education, published a list of five names their research (sifting through rumors and speculation) turned up in conversations about who the next New York mayor may tap to lead the largest school districts in the nation. Montgomery County schools chief Josh Starr also made the list, but said that he loved his current job and was committed to it. You can read the Gotham Schools post by clicking here.
NEWS
By Cathy Carter | September 4, 2013
Growing up in Howard County, Caroline Bowman often fantasized about what it would be like to star in a Broadway musical. On an October afternoon in Manhattan in 2011, she came one step closer to finding out. "My cellphone rang and it was the casting director of 'Wicked,' " recalls the 2006 Glenelg High School graduate. "He said, 'Caroline, I'd like to offer you your Broadway debut.' '" To make the moment that much sweeter, Bowman's mother, Connie, was by was by her side when it happened.
NEWS
By Natalie J. Sokoloff, Ajima Olaghere and Blake Ethridge | September 3, 2013
Trayvon Martin's tragic death has rekindled pervasive concerns about race in the United States. It has stimulated discussion of disturbing social trends, including the profiling of black and Latino men and racial bias in law, policing and the courts. As we search for answers, a federal judge has found New York City's "stop and frisk" practices are racially biased and violate the constitutional rights of the racial/ethnic minorities detained by these practices. John Jay College of Criminal Justice scholars have found that blacks and Latinos combined were stopped nine times more than whites under these polices ("Stop, Question & Frisk Practices in New York City: A Primer")
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.