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By Frederick N. Mattis | January 25, 2014
Maryland lawmakers on Monday introduced a bill to restrict the sale of tobacco products in the state to those age 21 and older instead of the current age of 18. If passed, that would make Maryland the strictest state in the nation when it comes to cigarette purchases. A few states have raised the tobacco buying age to 19, but no other state has reached the 21 marker, and only one city has: New York City last year passed a bill restricting the sale of tobacco to age 21; it goes into effect in April.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
Last year, Comedy Central delivered one of TV's most successful midseason series with "Inside Amy Schumer," starring Towson University grad and standup comedian Amy Schumer. Wednesday night, the channel introduces another new series starring a Baltimore-area college grad, and it looks like Comedy Central has another winner. "Broad City" is created by and stars Abbi Jacobson and Ilana Glazer as best friends trying to navigate lousy jobs, incredibly awkward situations and continually dashed hopes in New York City.
NEWS
January 18, 2014
I have 300 years of family history in Central Maryland, Delaware and Pennsylvania. I lived in New York City for four years. Eileen Pollock is on target - Baltimore is the only large city Maryland has and should not be neglected ("Baltimore is no New York," Jan. 13). I questioned in the 1960s after completing college why jobs were leaving Baltimore and was patronizingly told, "There will be plenty of jobs left, little girl. " A sadness and regret of my older years has been the lack of interest by Marylanders (including politicians)
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | January 12, 2014
FACT: New York City's Bill de Blasio ran on a progressive platform of "tax the rich," government welfare-ism and strident unionism in his successful bid to succeed Mayor Michael Bloomberg. OPINION: Mr. de Blasio is the new hope and change for America's depressed liberals. He is the anti-Giuliani, an aggressive progressive intent on remaking NYC into a progressive mecca. It's all back to the future - a David Dinkins era redux replete with familiar class envy rhetoric. Such a vision should strike fear in the hearts of any and all who live, work, visit or play in the Big Apple.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | December 29, 2013
Just when it seems that the high-speed connective power of social media has been harnessed mainly to bully and harass and to coalesce hate, there comes the evolved flash mob. What began a decade ago as a sudden public gathering to perform a pointless and silly act - and what turned ugly in urban areas when angry young people used it as a way to intimidate and vandalize - has become a random act of beauty. And with the aid of other social media, like Facebook and YouTube, these gone-in-a-moment events can be enjoyed over and over again by people who will wish they had been there.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2013
Milford Mill's Toni Brown finished second in the 300-meter dash on Saturday in the 60th Bishop Loughlin Games at the New Balance Track & Field Center at The Armory in New York City. Brown, 5 feet 6 and 132-pounds, ran the distance in a personal-best 39.47 seconds. She was the No. 3 seed in the race after winning her preliminary heat in 40.47 seconds. “I was nervous only because I wanted to make sure I did everything right,” said Brown, a senior. “When you stop being nervous that's when you stop having something be nervous about.” The Bishop Loughlin Games are billed as the oldest and largest high school indoor track meet in the country.
NEWS
December 20, 2013
If there's one place which has absolutely no right to judge others, it is Baltimore City ("Columbia drab? Duh," Dec. 16). And I say that kindly - and lovingly. I grew up in Baltimore, and I'm the first to defend it. Who better than a former citizen to understand a city's beauty and its flaws? Baltimore has always been odd, if not downright weird. I was raised on stories of farming pigs in chain-linked Hampden gardens. I ate shrimp salad sandwiches, smiling at the toothless and nigh incomprehensible wash-and-set dinner ladies at Cross Street Market.
NEWS
November 24, 2013
A recent report published by the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College belies the exaggerated storyline in the press that public employee pensions are the major expense of American cities and will lead to municipal bankruptcy if they are not reformed. The report, authored by Alicia H. Munnell, Jean-Pierre Aubry, Josh Hurwitz and Mark Cafarelli, took a sample of 173 cities and included the associated contributions to state plans for school districts as well as the contributions to their own plans.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
Baltimore police say they stopped residents 123,000 times last year but found only nine handguns - a figure civil rights advocates say is so implausible that it raises questions about whether the agency is actually monitoring the conduct of officers on the streets. "I think what's become apparent is that the department can make no credible assertion at this point about how they are using stop and frisk or what it accomplishes," said Sonia Kumar, a staff attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
Fundraising events can make for strange bedfellows, particularly when it comes to politics. But more than a few heads were turned, eyebrows were raised and stomachs were -- well, you get the picture -- when it was announced that former longtime rivals and now retired college basketball coaches Gary Williams and Jim Calhoun would be part of the same "Lunch with Legends" in New York City. In town for a game Friday night between their two former teams at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., Williams and Calhoun broke only bread during a luncheon hosted by the Terrapin Club. Williams and Calhoun seem to have buried the proverbial hatchet in their well-publicized feud that flared up nearly a decade ago when the Terps and Huskies were both recruiting former Archbishop Spalding star Rudy Gay, who eventually chose Connecticut.
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