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NEWS
July 1, 2014
A year after Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake pledged to reinvigorate the city's civilian police review board, panel members say nothing much has changed. That's hardly surprising. The board still lacks the power to investigate citizens' complaints of police misconduct in a timely fashion, and its recommendations are routinely ignored by the department. A panel so toothless that even its own members publicly wonder whether their efforts are a complete waste of time obviously isn't accomplishing its mission as a mediator of police-community relations.
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NEWS
June 21, 2014
My household recently received two mailers attacking Del. Jon Cardin from a group that calls itself "Marylanders for Integrity in Government PAC" and credited "Anne Adoryan, Treasurer. " The return address was a post office box in Hampden. When I checked the Maryland State Board of Elections' on-line database, there was no listing for this organization. When I Googled Anne Adoryan's name, I found that she was a law student who only recently moved here from Ohio. After Delegate Cardin's campaign sued the rump organization for failing to disclose its donors, a report was posted on the state election board's website showing that "Marylanders for Integrity in Government" received one $50,000 contribution from a union in Washington, D.C. and another $50,000 contribution from a union in New York City.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
As I watched HBO's new film "The Normal Heart" this weekend, sharp memories kept flashing through my mind of emaciated young people wracked with sores and dying before my eyes. They are memories I shouldn't have, memories most gay men my age thankfully lack. I was born in 1985 - the same year as the premier of Larry Kramer's Tony Award-winning play on the start of the AIDS epidemic in New York City's gay community, which "The Normal Heart" was adapted from. Thanks to a host of drugs now available to HIV-positive people in the United States, I count myself among a generation of American gay men who never had to watch thousands of our peers rapidly deteriorate from perfect health to death's doorstep because of a monstrous, unnamed disease.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
The debut novel of a 30-year-old author born in the Baltimore area and now living in Owings Mills is landing higher and higher on Amazon.com 's list of top-selling new releases in gay paperback fiction. Jeremy Scott Blaustein attended the Carver Center for Arts & Technology in Towson, studied theater at Shenandoah University and was an award-winning Broadway producer for six years before returning to the Baltimore area about a year ago to begin writing his novel, "The Home for Wayward Ladies" -- about three gay friends fresh out of theater school and living in Manhattan.
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Date: March 29 Her story: Annabelle Alberts, 30, grew up in Detroit. She lived in New York City for 31/2 years before moving to Maryland in September 2012. She is the manager of marketing for Deloitte Forensic in Baltimore. Her parents, Marcia and Mike Alberts, live in Bloomfield Hills, Mich. His story: Scott Palagyi, 31, was born in Pittsburgh but grew up in York, Pa. He spent seven years working in Ohio for Procter & Gamble before being relocated to Baltimore about three years ago. He is the northeast distributions center operations leader for Procter & Gamble in Hunt Valley.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2014
The launch of Baltimore's bike-sharing program will be delayed until next summer after the hardware and equipment vendor selected by the city filed for bankruptcy, officials said Wednesday. The city is expected to seek new vendors through a bid process as early as June, said Kathy Dominick, a spokeswoman for the Department of Transportation. The city is rewriting its request for proposal, or RFP. The city's program, to be called Charm City Bikeshare, was expected to open this spring with more than 250 bicycles available for short-term rentals at 25 stations.
NEWS
May 20, 2014
Susan Reimer 's column on elevator etiquette omits the cardinal rule of etiquette I saw riding a multitude of elevators over the years in New York City ( "Elevator etiquette dropping fast," May 16). In Class A office buildings like the Chrysler Building, men - in that hard-boiled, the faster-the-better city - have preserved an act of unexpected politeness. No gentleman steps into an elevator before a lady in New York. Ladies board first. How 1886! Eileen Pollock, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Christine W. "Chris" Hanley, who had worked in sales and marketing, died Friday of ovarian cancer at her New York City apartment. The Towson resident was 59. The daughter of William B. Wright, an AIG Insurance Co. and later Chubb Insurance Co. executive, and Polly B. Wright, a homemaker, Christine Marie Wright was born in Havana, and because of her father's work, spent her early years living in Cuba, Korea, Japan and Hong Kong. In 1964, she moved with her family to Rutland, Vt., where she graduated from Rutland High School in 1972.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Enrique G. "Henry" Martinez, former owner and operator of a New York City import-export firm, died Friday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Carroll Hospice's Dove House in Westminster. He was 90. The son of Hilario Martinez, a boxer, and Manola Serra Martinez, an actress, Enrique Guillermo Martinez was born and raised in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where he graduated from a local school. In his youth, he played rugby. Mr. Martinez studied architecture for a year in Buenos Aires.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
In New York City in the 1930s, '40s and '50s, when city laws made it illegal to serve gay patrons or hire gay employees, it took a lot of money and clout for a gay establishment to stay ahead of the vice police and remain open. The city's entrenched Mafia, of course, had both, and "specialized in illegal markets, which is what gay bars became in Gotham," writes 41-year-old Federal Hill resident Alex Hortis in his new book, " The Mob and the City ," due out from Prometheus Books next week.
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