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NEWS
By Daniel S. Greenberg | July 23, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Dog lovers can note with satisfaction several recent successes against the anti-dog rabble. But there's no room for complacency.In a long-overdue enhancement of urban graciousness, some restaurants in New York City have opened their outdoor sections to diners with canine companions. The restaurants are thus emulating a practice commonplace in France and elsewhere in Europe. As visitors to these places, they are notable for their peaceful manners. Generally, they snooze under the table, while their human companions dine, and look up only now and then for a nibble or two.The New York Times reports that restaurants in the city are happily experiencing a robust expansion of business from customers who previously were limited to dining at home with their dogs.
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NEWS
March 7, 2014
Horses don't belong in traffic or anywhere in the city ( "Baltimore Arabbers on edge after rash of run-ins with cars," March 5). It is a horrible life for them. They are scared, nervous, bored all denied all their ordinary social needs. I would have thought we had advanced further than this as a society and had left behind us the forced toil of innocent, speechless sentient creatures in an alien environment. These periodic debates about Arabbers never acknowledge the plainly obvious fact that these horses have terrible lives working in the busy streets with traffic and noise all around them.
NEWS
September 24, 2014
As one of the hundreds of thousands who participated in the People's Climate March in New York City on Sunday, I am outraged that The Sun buried its coverage of this event on Page 6, beneath a blurry photo of participants ("Worldwide marches call for climate effort," Sept. 22). It began by stating that "thousands of people" participated and did not cite the lowest estimate of the actual turnout, 310,000, until the ninth paragraph, the same paragraph in which it also mentioned that U.N. Secretary Ban Ki Moon, former Vice President Al Gore and actor Leonardo DiCaprio participated.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 21, 1998
ALBANY, N.Y. -- A majority of people who have left New York state's rapidly shrinking welfare rolls have not obtained legitimate jobs, a state survey indicates.The survey, the first of its kind in New York, found that between July 1996 and March 1997, only about 29 percent of former welfare recipients found full-time or part-time jobs. The state Department of Social Services compared lists of people whose benefits ended during each quarter within that period with lists of employees whose wages were reported to the state by their employers in later quarters.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
George B. Brosan, a career law enforcement officer who had served as Maryland State Police superintendent, died Thursday of cancer at his Annapolis home. He was 78. "He was a titan in both attitude and influence, and had a splendid career in law enforcement," said Cornelius J. Behan, retired Baltimore County police chief. "He was devoted to his family and he was devoted to the job. He brought integrity to his work and the agency by respecting the rules and the rule of law. " "George was as honest as can be and his integrity was never questioned," said Frank Panessa of Annapolis, who had worked with Mr. Brosan at the U.S. Customs Service as well as the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, which became the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and By Erica L. Green | October 2, 2013
Former Baltimore city schools CEO Andres Alonso has topped a short list of strong contenders for the schools chancellor seat in New York City. Gotham Schools, a news website that covers New York education, published a list of five names their research (sifting through rumors and speculation) turned up in conversations about who the next New York mayor may tap to lead the largest school districts in the nation. Montgomery County schools chief Josh Starr also made the list, but said that he loved his current job and was committed to it. You can read the Gotham Schools post by clicking here.
NEWS
January 18, 2014
I have 300 years of family history in Central Maryland, Delaware and Pennsylvania. I lived in New York City for four years. Eileen Pollock is on target - Baltimore is the only large city Maryland has and should not be neglected ("Baltimore is no New York," Jan. 13). I questioned in the 1960s after completing college why jobs were leaving Baltimore and was patronizingly told, "There will be plenty of jobs left, little girl. " A sadness and regret of my older years has been the lack of interest by Marylanders (including politicians)
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2010
A celebrity wedding would probably be daunting to many stylists. Not to Khalilah Williams-Webb. The 29-year-old is downright calm just days from what might be the biggest project of her career: the wedding of NBA superstar — and Towson Catholic High School standout — Carmelo Anthony and television personality LaLa Vasquez. The wedding has the added pressure of being a part of the couple's soon-to-be-released reality show on VH1. "These are things that I handle on a everyday basis," Williams-Webb said with a laugh.
NEWS
January 27, 2013
You know the beverage industry is running scared when it feels driven to mount an all-out campaign against a New York City law passed last year banning the sale of super-size sodas and sugary drinks. But it's beyond shameless when that effort includes arm-twisting support for its cause from a group representing the very people who would benefit most from the law. Yet that's what played out in a New York courtroom last week, when the city's NAACP branch took the industry's side by arguing that the ban on sugary drinks in containers larger than 16 ounces, which was strongly endorsed by Mayor Michael Bloomberg, would unfairly hurt residents in African-American communities.
NEWS
By LISA ANDERSON and LISA ANDERSON,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 13, 2006
NEW YORK -- Arriving in a blaze of thunder and lightning and dropping staggering snowfalls from Virginia to Maine, the nor'easter of 2006 roared up the East Coast yesterday, staging a spectacular show that shocked a region lulled by the mildest winter in years. "For those of you who thought snow would never arrive - you were wrong," said a deadpan Michael R. Bloomberg, the mayor of New York. The storm, delivering 26.9 inches, broke New York City's previous record for a single snowfall, 26.4 inches, set in 1947.
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