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NEWS
October 12, 1998
The New York Times said in an editorial last week:So here we are again, edging toward Election Day with no firm idea of what the ballots in New York City will look like. In particular, the referendum section, often tucked down at the lumbago level of the ballot, is still very much in doubt. The cause for this confusion is a highly vocal and political battle between Council Speaker Peter Vallone and Mayor Rudolph Giuliani.Vallone, who is running for governor, wants an item on the ballot that asks voters whether public funds can be used to move Yankee Stadium from the Bronx to Manhattan.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2010
Barbara R. Worthington, a retired credit union administrative assistant and weaver, died June 29 of lung cancer at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Mount Washington resident was 70. Barbara Reeves, the daughter of a Presbyterian minister and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Hills and Riverdale, N.Y. She was a 1957 graduate of Riverdale Country School and earned a bachelor's degree in psychology in 1961 from William Smith College, now Hobart William Smith.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 24, 2010
Eugene McLean Munnelly, a retired educator who taught at schools in Salisbury and Towson during a career that spanned nearly 50 years, died March 13 of congestive heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 80. Mr. Munnelly, the son of a construction worker and a homemaker, was born and raised in New York City. He served in the Navy from 1948 to 1949, and earned a bachelor's degree from St. Peter's College in Jersey City, N.J., in 1954. He earned a master's degree in 1965 from Fairfield University in Fairfield, Conn.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Wendy S. Levy, director of procurement and administrative services for Publishers' Circulation Fulfillment Inc. for two decades, died Tuesday of breast cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. She was 57. The daughter of Arnold Kleinfeld, a packaging salesman, and Helena Dressner Kleinfeld, a New York City public schools social worker, Wendy Susan Kleinfeld was born in New York City and raised in Great Neck, N.Y. She graduated in 1975 from Great Neck North High School. She attended Syracuse University.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | June 24, 2012
The Ehrlich boys sure love their summer Slurpees. Even the 50-something Ehrlich kid is not averse to indulging on the way home from those hot summer football practices. (Mom does not share our male addiction but usually lets us slide in the interest of family unity.) That the Ehrlich Slurpee bonding experience takes place in Annapolis and not New York City is a good thing, as the Big Apple now deals with the latest assault on individual freedom from Mayor Michael Bloomberg. The successor to the wildly successful Rudy Giuliani is a billionaire Democrat-turned-Republican-turned-independent.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Mattis | January 25, 2014
Maryland lawmakers on Monday introduced a bill to restrict the sale of tobacco products in the state to those age 21 and older instead of the current age of 18. If passed, that would make Maryland the strictest state in the nation when it comes to cigarette purchases. A few states have raised the tobacco buying age to 19, but no other state has reached the 21 marker, and only one city has: New York City last year passed a bill restricting the sale of tobacco to age 21; it goes into effect in April.
BUSINESS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 2, 1998
NEW YORK -- When finalized this spring, the deal was so secret the mayor did not know about it. A group of major financial companies had agreed to pay $5 million to build a new police museum, to be run by New York Police Commissioner Howard Safir's wife in a nonsalaried post. In return, the Police Department brass would shift 200 patrol officers to Wall Street.This agreement -- cash for city police protection -- is only one example of how the stock market boom has changed the balance of power in America's largest city.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2001
Six months after going public, Orion Power Holdings Inc. announced yesterday that its first-quarter earnings soared 82 percent, mostly due to the energy company's significant advances in building power plants across the country. In the three months that ended March 31, Orion, an independent power generating company, posted net income of $15.1 million compared with $8.3 million in the first quarter a year ago, when it was privately held. Earnings per share were 15 cents compared with 22 cents a year ago, a drop attributed to the company issuing 60.2 million more shares after its initial public offering in November.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | September 5, 1998
The hunt for a man wanted in the stabbing death June 30 of a 91-year-old Baltimore woman ended with his capture at a telephone booth in New York City, the FBI said yesterday.Christopher Mills, 25, was arrested late Thursday at West 54th Street and Broadway after a series of call-in leads enabled federal agents to track him down, said Special Agent Peter A. Gulotta Jr., an FBI spokesman in Baltimore."We had a lot of tips about where he was," Gulotta said. "We had tracked him through three states, including Maryland, Florida and New York."
NEWS
April 5, 2000
WITH THE MIGHT of city voters' mandate, Mayor Martin O'Malley made clear yesterday that he won't tinker with a radical crime-fighting plan recommended by his consultants. This is the reality the City Council and others need to take into account as the process for naming the successor to Commissioner Ronald L. Daniel moves ahead. They may argue about the wisdom of the mayor's choice of Edward T. Norris, a former New York City deputy commissioner, to run the Baltimore Police Department. But the 152-page crime-fighting blueprint, in Mr. O'Malley's judgment, is non-negotiable.
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