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Lorraine Mirabella | October 25, 2013
Under Armour is taking its Brand House specialty store concept to the Big Apple. The Baltimore-based sports apparel brand launched the new retail format in February with a store in Harbor East, and this week set a Nov. 7 opening date for a previously announced location in Tysons Corner Center in Virginia. The apparel and footwear powerhouse is not stopping there. Plans are in the works to bring the first Under Armour specialty store to New York City. Under Armour founder and CEO Kevin Plank briefly mentioned the new store on a conference call Thursday when the company released its third quarter earnings.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
Jacob M. "Jack" Schmulowitz, a retired Social Security Administration division chief, died of kidney failure Wednesday at Sinai Hospital. He was 85. The son of Polish immigrants Julius Schmulowitz, a baker, and Lillie Schmulowitz, a homemaker, Jacob Martin Schmulowitz was born in New York City and raised in the Bronx. He was a graduate of William Howard Taft High School in the Bronx, where his classmates included singer Eydie Gorme and Stanley Kubrick, the film director and screenwriter.
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SPORTS
By Colleen Thomas and The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
In honor of Loyola joining the Patriot League, City Council president Bernard C.“Jack” Young declared Monday to be Patriot League Day in Baltimore. Loyola and Boston University are the two teams joining the Patriot League this season, expanding the conference to 10 teams. Loyola's move was announced Aug.29. Similar announcements were happening Monday in the Atlantic Coast Conference. The city of Pittsburgh declared Monday University of Pittsburgh Atlantic Coast Conference Day, with the Panthers officially joining the ACC. The ACC also added Notre Dame - for every sport but football - and Syracuse for the 2013 season.
NEWS
September 24, 2014
As one of the hundreds of thousands who participated in the People's Climate March in New York City on Sunday, I am outraged that The Sun buried its coverage of this event on Page 6, beneath a blurry photo of participants ("Worldwide marches call for climate effort," Sept. 22). It began by stating that "thousands of people" participated and did not cite the lowest estimate of the actual turnout, 310,000, until the ninth paragraph, the same paragraph in which it also mentioned that U.N. Secretary Ban Ki Moon, former Vice President Al Gore and actor Leonardo DiCaprio participated.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Atlantic Coast Conference commissioner John Swofford said at a news conference on Wednesday that playing a men's basketball tournament in  New York City sometime in the near future is possible, and that Washington is still on the league's radar as a potential tournament site despite Maryland's departure after this season. "I wouldn't want to handicap that, but without a doubt New York City is prominent part of our footprint," Swofford said. "Any college team knows New York City and there's a particular interest in college basketball there.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2011
— The look of joyous disbelief on Lisa Jones' face was similar to those worn by previous winners of Washington College's Sophie Kerr Prize. But everything else leading up to Tuesday's announcement — from the afternoon trip over the Brooklyn Bridge to the National Book Award winner pulling Jones' name from his blazer — was a departure from the past. Instead of receiving the nation's most lucrative undergraduate literary prize before a crowd of cap-and-gowned college kids in Chestertown, Jones won it in the capital of the publishing world, with the Hudson River as a majestic backdrop.
NEWS
By WILLIAM GRIMES and WILLIAM GRIMES,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 8, 1998
NEW YORK - At a far corner of Brooklyn sits Floyd Bennett Field, where the wind swirls and whips, disturbing the ghosts of Amelia Earhart, Howard Hughes and Wiley Post, the fliers who helped make the place a symbol of the romance of aviation.Despite appearances, the abandoned airport is a thriving place - for nature, that is.For some time now, Margaret Mittelbach and Michael Crewdson have treated the old Brooklyn airfield as their personal Yosemite. With binoculars and Audubon field guides in hand, they wander the old runways, amble around the crumbling buildings and pick their way along the sandy path that winds through the young forest known as the North 40 in search of the birds, animals and wildflowers that carve out a living in what was once a cluster of islands bordering Jamaica Bay.Their peculiar insistence on seeing New York City as a vast nature preserve with rude, concrete interruptions led to a recently published book, "Wild New York" (Crown, $30)
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
Baltimore police said Wednesday that detectives believe a suspect in the fatal shooting of 1-year-old Carter Scott last month has fled to New York City. Police have identified Rashid Mayo, 22, as a suspect in the May 24 shooting that left Carter dead and his father, Rashaw Scott, 22, seriously wounded. Two other alleged gunmen have also been charged - Eddie Tarver, 20, whom they said they caught in a pursuit after the shooting, and Cornell Harvey, 26, whom Rashaw Scott allegedly identified as one of the gunmen.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 1998
BEACON, N.Y. -- The queen's torso is hidden behind a 20-foot-high tarp. Her head rests on the foundry floor, next to Leonardo da Vinci's "Colossus." All the foundry's men may be able to put her together, but will she ever make it home to the East River?Few works of art have generated more controversy before their completion than the statue of Queen Catherine, for which bronze is being poured at the Tallix Foundry in this small upstate town. Yet the 17th-century Portuguese princess who became an English ruler is virtually unknown among Americans, including the more than 2 million who live in the New York City borough named after her, Queens.
FEATURES
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1998
"Freedom is about authority. Freedom is about the willingness of every single human being to cede to lawful authority a great deal of discretion about what you do and how you do it."-- New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani NEW YORK -- He may have been hanging by a wire high above a stage, made up for a skit to look like the Beast from Broadway's "Beauty and the Beast," but the mayor of New York still had just one thing on his mind: making his city more civil."This is the way to beat jaywalking!"
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Richard William Parsons, a retired Baltimore County librarian who also spent nearly 50 years as a residential advocate for Towson, died of cancer Monday at his Woodbine Avenue home. He was 87. Born in Victoria, British Columbia, he was the son of Thomas Parsons, a commandant of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and Laura Lyons, a homemaker. He earned a bachelor's degree in Slavic languages at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and had a master's degree in library science from McGill University.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
You can thank Wolfgang Puck. The era of good casino dining is generally traced back to 1992, when the Los Angeles-based chef opened a version of his famed Hollywood restaurant, Spago, at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. From then on, you didn't have to know a flush from a straight to have a good time in Sin City. Within a decade of Spago's opening, Vegas was a paradise for restaurant lovers. Michelin-star chefs like Thomas Keller and Joel Robuchon came to town. Nobu, Le Cirque and other famous New York restaurants opened on the strip.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | August 21, 2014
Twin crusades to convert more parents to cloth diapering and to instill confidence in the art of “babywearing” have helped make Greenberries a destination for shoppers from as far away as Annapolis and Gaithersburg. Providing education and support to parents wasn't part of the original formula for the Columbia children's and maternity consignment boutique, which is celebrating its fifth birthday with a party at the Snowden Center store Aug. 16. But just six months after opening the store in 2009, owner Rachel Baliff jumped on a customer's suggestion to sell cloth diapers.
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
Date: June 14 Her story: Jannette Merritt, 31, grew up in Owings Mills. She is a technical accounts manager at Livefyre, a social content sharing company, in its New York City office. Her father, Otis Merritt III, a retired warden of the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, and stepmother, Clarice Paschall , live in Baltimore. Her mother, Marlene Merritt-Hall, and stepfather, Charles Hall, live in Myrtle Beach, S.C. His story: Michael Phillips, 40, grew up in Queens, N.Y. He is a network engineer for Collective, an online audience targeting company based in New York City.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Dr. Garfield D. Kington, a physician who was a familiar and comforting presence to his West Baltimore patients for decades, died Aug. 3 of multiple myeloma at his Northwest Baltimore home. He was 91. "We were colleagues on the medical staff at Provident Hospital and became friends. I met Dr. Kington and observed him in his office, where he worked late through the day seeing patients in a tough neighborhood and provided an excellent standard of care," said Dr. Keiffer Mitchell, an internist who has practiced in Baltimore for 43 years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
George W. Collins, a pioneering WMAR-TV broadcaster who earlier had been editor-in-chief of the Afro-American newspaper and covered the civil rights movement and political corruption in Maryland, died Thursday of renal failure at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 88. "George was an important figure in Baltimore's struggle for fairness for everybody. No one was more influential in the African-American community when it came to voicing their concerns," said Moses Newson, former executive editor of the Afro-American.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
The number of per-capita murders in Baltimore in 2012 ranked sixth in the country among cities with 100,000 people or more, according to data submitted by cities and released by the FBI on Monday.  After dipping below 200 homicides in 2011 for the first time since 1978 - when Baltimore had nearly 200,000 more residents than today - the homicide count jumped to 219* last year. It was still the second-lowest population-adjusted murder rate since the late 1980s, and the city ranked the same as it did the year before.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2004
Nancy Elisabet Soderberg, daughter of Nancy M. Soderberg and Lars O. Soderberg of Nantucket, MA, was married on June 5, 2004 to Richard Todd Bistrong, son of Susan Strong of New York City and Walter Bistrong of Long Island. The Rev. Jennifer Brooks and Cantor Avi Teken performed the ceremony at the Second Congressional Meeting House in Nantucket, MA. Following the five o'clock wedding, a reception and dinner were held at the Nantucket Yacht Club. The bride is Vice-President of the International Crisis Group in New York City.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
The phenomenon known as the pop-up dinner, in which nontraditional spaces are converted into short-term dining venues, has been around for a few years. But a quickly expanding company named Dinner Lab is bringing what originally was a haphazard practice to a professional scale. And Baltimore is among the newest markets for the New Orleans-based company. Dinner Lab will make its official Baltimore debut on Aug. 15. The company is now enrolling subscribers for its series of dining events, each of which showcases a single chef who creates a multicourse menu for the dinner.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
Edward J. Rasmussen, a retired insurance broker who also translated Japanese, died June 20 of pneumonia at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 95. The son of J. David Rasmussen, a New York City insurance broker, and Ellamae Rasmussen, a homemaker, Edward Jeppe Rasmussen was born in Brooklyn and spent his early years in Queens before moving with his family to Scarsdale. After graduating from Scarsdale High School in 1937, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1942 from Dartmouth College.
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