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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Evening Sun Staff | December 29, 1990
When Jukebox Live breaks into "Shake, Rattle and Roll" on a boisterous New Year's Eve, the real world fades away. That, in itself, is ample reward for a musician. Take it from Lou Bell, the band's 44-year-old lead singer and keyboard player."Probably to any musician, it's the biggest night of the year. The best night of the year. It's the party time, where people -- no matter what is going on all year -- have a good time," Bell says.It is a New Year's Eve band's solemn responsibility to usher revelers from one year to the next with ritualistic, soul-cleansing abandon.
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By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
The death of Aaliyah Boyer, a 10-year-old struck down in Cecil County, and the shooting of Laurie Eberhardt, a grandmother hit by gunfire in Florida, share the same perplexing challenge for prosecutors and investigators. Both were watching fireworks on New Year's Eve when they were hit by apparent celebratory gunfire. And both face long odds of having their shooters brought to justice because of the anonymity of the crime and weak laws against firing guns indiscriminately into the air. If authorities ever find the person who fired the shot that hit Aaliyah, the county's top prosecutor said, a misdemeanor charge might be the most he or she could face.
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
Aaliyah Boyer had hoped to watch the New Year's ball drop on TV, but when she learned she had missed the stroke of midnight by 32 seconds, she returned to the front yard with her friends to watch her neighbors light fireworks. Nearby, someone apparently fired a gun into the air to add to the celebration. Amid the jubilation, the 10-year-old fell to the ground, the warmth and color draining from her body after she was hit by a falling bullet. Her family initially thought that she had fainted, but the wound would prove fatal.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
Aaliyah Boyer had hoped to watch the New Year's ball drop on TV, but when she learned she had missed the stroke of midnight by 32 seconds, she returned to the front yard with her friends to watch her neighbors light fireworks. Nearby, someone apparently fired a gun into the air to add to the celebration. Amid the jubilation, the 10-year-old fell to the ground, the warmth and color draining from her body after she was hit by a falling bullet. Her family initially thought that she had fainted, but the wound would prove fatal.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2011
With New Year's Eve just a month away, we asked our staff about the pros and cons of the night. Here's what they had to say. •••• Best: There's almost always an awesome party to attend. Worst: There's yet another night that Ryan Seacrest is on TV.  Luke Broadwater, reporter, The Baltimore Sun •••• Worst is hats. And drunk people. Best is drunken people in hats.  Anne Tallent, editor,  b •••• Best: Getting to use a new calendar.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano | December 28, 1990
Monday is usually the slowest night of the week, with many bars, clubs and restaurants either nearly deserted or actually closed as people stay home in droves. But with New Year's Eve falling on a Monday this year, the whole town will be jumping.The most popular spot to welcome the new year, our town square if you will, is of course the Inner Harbor. The big news story there Monday night will be the huge octopus covering the side of the National Aquarium. Well, actually that octopus will be one of the many laser images projected onto the Aquarium and the World Trade Center in a high-tech laser and fireworks show celebrating the Aquarium's new Marine Mammal Pavilion.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,Sun reporter | December 31, 2006
As 2006 draws to a close, revelers will gasp at the Inner Harbor fireworks, and partygoers will raise their glasses to toast the new year. But at churches around the city and across the country, many will mark the hour in a different way: by approaching the altar and dropping to their knees at Watch Night services. "You start off with giving [God] the first part of the year," said Bishop Kevia F. Elliott, pastor of The Lord's Church in Pimlico, who expects more than 600 congregants and friends to gather for music, testimony and preaching past midnight.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | January 4, 2009
A private chef in Washington had ordered 200 for his "very exclusive" New Year's Eve party. A California transplant living in Baltimore wanted a variety pack of 30 for her own year-end shindig. And a Mexican immigrant, acting out a near-daily ritual, said she'd be buying three of the $1.75 treats, one for now and two for later. It's always tamale time at Michelle's Cafe in Fells Point, but on Wednesday, as throughout this holiday season, the cornmeal concoctions were practically flying out of the steamer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Sun Staff | January 6, 2002
A new year brings a new start for many people, and that's especially true for Meghan Gullette and Brian Wells, who were married on New Year's Eve. "It's a special holiday for the two of us," says Meghan, explaining that she and Brian have celebrated every New Year's Eve together since they started dating. This past New Year's Eve, the couple's evening began at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen in Baltimore with a Catholic wedding ceremony. Amid eight bridesmaids and seven groomsmen, one space was left empty for Meghan's brother, who died in a car accident a year ago. Afterward, there was a black-tie reception at the Belvedere hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Guiliano | December 28, 1990
Traditions have got to start sometime. First Night Annapolis rings in the new year with this new event showcasing the performing arts."Since the First Night concept of showcasing the arts began in Boston in 1976, it has grown to over 60 cities with their own First Night celebrations," explains Elizabeth Welch, co-executive director of the Annapolis event."
EXPLORE
January 2, 2013
A Belcamp teenager died early New Year's Day after being injured in a crash on Bush Chapel Road in Aberdeen shortly before New Year's Eve became 2013, the Harford County Sheriff's Office reported. At 11:21 p.m. Dec. 31, Harford County sheriff's deputies responded to the 300 block of Bush Chapel Road in Aberdeen for a report of a motor vehicle collision with entrapment. The sheriff's office investigation revealed that Austin D. Remines, 17, of the 1200 block of Person Place in Belcamp, was driving a 2008 Suzuki Forenza on Bush Chapel Road near the intersection of Mt. Calvary Church Road.
EXPLORE
January 1, 2013
On a near perfect New Year's Eve night, Havre de Grace welcomed 2013 with its 14th annual Duck Drop and fireworks. With temperatures in the low 30s and nary a breeze to disturb the stillness of the evening, hundreds descended on the area around the Havre de Grace Middle School and countless others watched from vantage points elsewhere in the city in anticipation of the Duck Drop. Sponsored by the Susquehanna Hose Co., whose members in recent years have added the city's holiday defining reverie to its boundless community service, the duck was hoisted atop one of the company's trucks with its apparatus fully extended high above the school grounds.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2012
This year ends with a seasonable day in Baltimore, with a highs in the mid 40s and cloudy skies. Monday is expected to start near freezing, with lows in the lower 30s. Normal temperatures this time of year are a high around 42 and a low around 25. Clouds are expected to move in throughout the day, with southwest winds shifting to westerly winds of about 10-15 mph. With the wind chill, temperatures will feel in the upper 20s in the morning and...
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2012
Thousands of people streamed into Baltimore's Inner Harbor on New Year's Eve night to welcome 2013 with a bang of fireworks expected at midnight — a tradition for some and a new experience for others — as police scanned the crowds for threats. Steve and Lori Foster, along with their twin 12-year-old sons, Luke and Dylan, traveled from Newark, Del., for their first New Year's Eve in the city. "Somebody told us they have a really nice event down here, so we decided to come check it out," Steve said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2012
Although the program's suspension was announced in July, AAA Mid-Atlantic would like to remind Marylanders that the free Tipsy?Taxi! service will not run this New Year's Eve, says Public and Government Affairs Manager Ragina C. Averella. The last Tipsy?Taxi! service provided in Maryland was for July 4 of this year. The service was established in 2006, and it gave free taxi rides during popular holidays known for their partying. Averella says one of the main reasons for the suspension was lack of funding.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2012
I can get pretty sentimental on the last day of the year, and I thought some of you might be the same. So here's a little sentiment for New Year's Eve, courtesy of Johann Strauss' "Die Fledermaus. " There is a wonderful moment in Act 2 when all of the mirth and slapstick of the operetta gives way to something gentle and, I think, quite genuine. This number, "Brüderlein und Schwesterlein," sends a message that boils down to: Let's all promise to get along tomorrow after having so much fun tonight -- a message perfect for a New Year's Eve toast.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 10, 1995
As a New York actress and a devout reader of books about great women in history, Jeanne Latter is always on the lookout for interesting female roles. And when she read the Laura Shamas play "Amelia Lives!," her interest was piqued.For good reason. The award-winning entry at the world-famous Edinburgh Festival recounts the life of Amelia Earhart, the American aviator whose disappearance over the South Pacific in 1937 still has the experts debating where she went down and why."I was immediately attracted to her courage and determination," said Ms. Latter, who will perform extensive excerpts from "Amelia Lives!"
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff | December 23, 1999
There is one sure bet about Y2K -- it is costing a fortune.Exterminating the Y2K bug from the nation's private and government computers between 1995 and 2001 is expected to cost $100 billion, according to a Commerce Department estimate.Costs to the federal government are expected to reach $8.4 billion, and state budget analysts put Maryland's tab at $150 million.The cost might translate into higher taxes, electric bills, hospital rates and phone bills and increased fees for the services of bankers, investment brokers and other computer-oriented businesses.
BUSINESS
Patrick Maynard and The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2012
Why is “Trouble Maker,” a K-pop song that's been around for a year, suddenly getting worldwide Twitter love? I blame end-of-year lists and an upcoming awards ceremony. On a less global scale, residents along the East Coast continue to be curious about this weekend's weather, and Maryland residents are getting antsy about whether Congress will manage to avoid the fiscal cliff. Additionally, there's national attention focused on what lawmakers decide to do regarding guns. Finally, a member of Australia's Janoskians has given opinions on his favorite foods.
TRAVEL
By Zach Sparks, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2012
New York City Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve with Ryan Seacrest More than 35 years of tradition make New Year's Rockin' Eve one of America's most popular festivities. Taylor Swift, Carly Rae Jepsen, Psy and Neon Trees will greet the new year live from Times Square. The West Coast show will feature Justin Bieber, Jason Aldean, Greyson Chance, Ellie Goulding and The Wanted. In remembrance of Dick Clark, who dies this year, Fergie and Jenny McCarthy will host a special two-hour look back at the life of the television personality.
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