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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Evening Sun Staff | December 29, 1990
When Jukebox Live breaks into "Shake, Rattle and Roll" on a boisterous New Year's Eve, the real world fades away. That, in itself, is ample reward for a musician. Take it from Lou Bell, the band's 44-year-old lead singer and keyboard player."Probably to any musician, it's the biggest night of the year. The best night of the year. It's the party time, where people -- no matter what is going on all year -- have a good time," Bell says.It is a New Year's Eve band's solemn responsibility to usher revelers from one year to the next with ritualistic, soul-cleansing abandon.
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By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
The death of Aaliyah Boyer, a 10-year-old struck down in Cecil County, and the shooting of Laurie Eberhardt, a grandmother hit by gunfire in Florida, share the same perplexing challenge for prosecutors and investigators. Both were watching fireworks on New Year's Eve when they were hit by apparent celebratory gunfire. And both face long odds of having their shooters brought to justice because of the anonymity of the crime and weak laws against firing guns indiscriminately into the air. If authorities ever find the person who fired the shot that hit Aaliyah, the county's top prosecutor said, a misdemeanor charge might be the most he or she could face.
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
Aaliyah Boyer had hoped to watch the New Year's ball drop on TV, but when she learned she had missed the stroke of midnight by 32 seconds, she returned to the front yard with her friends to watch her neighbors light fireworks. Nearby, someone apparently fired a gun into the air to add to the celebration. Amid the jubilation, the 10-year-old fell to the ground, the warmth and color draining from her body after she was hit by a falling bullet. Her family initially thought that she had fainted, but the wound would prove fatal.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
Aaliyah Boyer had hoped to watch the New Year's ball drop on TV, but when she learned she had missed the stroke of midnight by 32 seconds, she returned to the front yard with her friends to watch her neighbors light fireworks. Nearby, someone apparently fired a gun into the air to add to the celebration. Amid the jubilation, the 10-year-old fell to the ground, the warmth and color draining from her body after she was hit by a falling bullet. Her family initially thought that she had fainted, but the wound would prove fatal.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2011
With New Year's Eve just a month away, we asked our staff about the pros and cons of the night. Here's what they had to say. •••• Best: There's almost always an awesome party to attend. Worst: There's yet another night that Ryan Seacrest is on TV.  Luke Broadwater, reporter, The Baltimore Sun •••• Worst is hats. And drunk people. Best is drunken people in hats.  Anne Tallent, editor,  b •••• Best: Getting to use a new calendar.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | December 23, 2006
Elene Celentano gets what she wants. When she wanted to rise to the top of her new career choice -- real estate -- she did it. When she wanted to sculpt her thin frame into a taut and enviable physique, she ran, biked and roller-bladed her way to it. So when it came time this month to look for the perfect dress to wear to her annual New Year's Eve party, Celentano knew it would only be a matter of time before she found it. Not even she could have...
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff | December 23, 1999
There is one sure bet about Y2K -- it is costing a fortune.Exterminating the Y2K bug from the nation's private and government computers between 1995 and 2001 is expected to cost $100 billion, according to a Commerce Department estimate.Costs to the federal government are expected to reach $8.4 billion, and state budget analysts put Maryland's tab at $150 million.The cost might translate into higher taxes, electric bills, hospital rates and phone bills and increased fees for the services of bankers, investment brokers and other computer-oriented businesses.
FEATURES
By William Grimes and William Grimes,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 5, 1997
There are a few shortsighted travelers left who do not know what they are doing on New Year's Eve in 1999. David Banford is not one of them. When the odometer of our spinning orb ticks over for the year 2000, Banford, a British investor in small businesses, will be floating off Barbados aboard the Queen Elizabeth 2, with 99 other members of his club.He will toast the New Year and the new millennium with champagne that has been awaiting the occasion since 1982, the year that he and a group of old school friends put down a $10,000 deposit to reserve 50 double cabins and lay down some serious Bordeaux, ports and champagnes.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1998
The women who founded First Night Annapolis nine years ago have been fired by the board of directors they created to oversee the New Year's Eve celebration.Lana Nelson and Elizabeth Welch, owners of Nelson Welch Partners, were informed by the board late last month that their annual contract would not be renewed.Instead, the eight-member board appointed Virginia management consultant Janice Gary to the position of executive director on April 1 and offered Nelson and Welch new roles as consultants with drastically reduced responsibilities and pay.Nelson Welch Partners was paid $100,000 a year plus benefits -- a quarter of the annual budget -- to run the nonalcoholic event, in which courtrooms, church halls and shop windows are turned into performance sites.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1998
They've organized the city, they've organized the acts, and this year they're trying to organize you.The folks at First Night Annapolis have gotten it all together a little better with an expanded and more organized New Year's Eve gala prepared for those who brave the cold and the crowds to celebrate the holiday with the arts.This year's event will offer about 250 performers in 47 venues throughout the city's historic district, and many -- 33 percent -- are local. The Ballet Theater of Annapolis and the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra are joining the celebration for the first time.
EXPLORE
January 2, 2013
A Belcamp teenager died early New Year's Day after being injured in a crash on Bush Chapel Road in Aberdeen shortly before New Year's Eve became 2013, the Harford County Sheriff's Office reported. At 11:21 p.m. Dec. 31, Harford County sheriff's deputies responded to the 300 block of Bush Chapel Road in Aberdeen for a report of a motor vehicle collision with entrapment. The sheriff's office investigation revealed that Austin D. Remines, 17, of the 1200 block of Person Place in Belcamp, was driving a 2008 Suzuki Forenza on Bush Chapel Road near the intersection of Mt. Calvary Church Road.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2013
A 23-year-old man suffered serious injuries when he was stabbed at a Timonium hotel following a New Year's Eve party, a Baltimore County police spokeswoman said. County police were called at 2:47 a.m. Tuesday to Crowne Plaza Hotel on Greenspring Drive, where witnesses told the responding officers that a person had been injured but had left the hotel in a vehicle, said police spokeswoman Cpl. Cathy Batton. About half an hour later, she said city police reported that the man who had been stabbed at the hotel was being treated at a city hospital.
EXPLORE
January 1, 2013
On a near perfect New Year's Eve night, Havre de Grace welcomed 2013 with its 14th annual Duck Drop and fireworks. With temperatures in the low 30s and nary a breeze to disturb the stillness of the evening, hundreds descended on the area around the Havre de Grace Middle School and countless others watched from vantage points elsewhere in the city in anticipation of the Duck Drop. Sponsored by the Susquehanna Hose Co., whose members in recent years have added the city's holiday defining reverie to its boundless community service, the duck was hoisted atop one of the company's trucks with its apparatus fully extended high above the school grounds.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2012
Thousands of people streamed into Baltimore's Inner Harbor on New Year's Eve night to welcome 2013 with a bang of fireworks expected at midnight — a tradition for some and a new experience for others — as police scanned the crowds for threats. Steve and Lori Foster, along with their twin 12-year-old sons, Luke and Dylan, traveled from Newark, Del., for their first New Year's Eve in the city. "Somebody told us they have a really nice event down here, so we decided to come check it out," Steve said.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2012
This year ends with a seasonable day in Baltimore, with a highs in the mid 40s and cloudy skies. Monday is expected to start near freezing, with lows in the lower 30s. Normal temperatures this time of year are a high around 42 and a low around 25. Clouds are expected to move in throughout the day, with southwest winds shifting to westerly winds of about 10-15 mph. With the wind chill, temperatures will feel in the upper 20s in the morning and...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2012
I can get pretty sentimental on the last day of the year, and I thought some of you might be the same. So here's a little sentiment for New Year's Eve, courtesy of Johann Strauss' "Die Fledermaus. " There is a wonderful moment in Act 2 when all of the mirth and slapstick of the operetta gives way to something gentle and, I think, quite genuine. This number, "Brüderlein und Schwesterlein," sends a message that boils down to: Let's all promise to get along tomorrow after having so much fun tonight -- a message perfect for a New Year's Eve toast.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,Sun reporter | December 31, 2006
As 2006 draws to a close, revelers will gasp at the Inner Harbor fireworks, and partygoers will raise their glasses to toast the new year. But at churches around the city and across the country, many will mark the hour in a different way: by approaching the altar and dropping to their knees at Watch Night services. "You start off with giving [God] the first part of the year," said Bishop Kevia F. Elliott, pastor of The Lord's Church in Pimlico, who expects more than 600 congregants and friends to gather for music, testimony and preaching past midnight.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | December 31, 2005
At the end of December 1944, a war-weary world looked toward the coming new year and an end to the hostilities that had gripped it since 1939. After a month that saw the furious fighting in the Ardennes and the bloody Battle of the Bulge, the war news from Europe was slowly becoming slightly more encouraging -- albeit no less threatening. "Three German divisions have been hurled by Field Marshal von Rundstedt at both sides of the Bastogne corridor held by Lt. Gen. George S. Patton's United States 3d Army, a field dispatch reported last night, as American troops hammered heavily all along the shrinking perimeter of the German bulge," reported The Sun on New Year's Eve. "The hard-won corridor supplying Bastogne was hit by two of von Rundstedt's divisions from the west and by a third from the east, while in Bastogne itself American artillerymen poured withering shellfire into the 16-mile-wide escape gap of the Germans' hourglass-shaped front and blasted areas where the Germans have been gathering for new thrusts."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2012
Although the program's suspension was announced in July, AAA Mid-Atlantic would like to remind Marylanders that the free Tipsy?Taxi! service will not run this New Year's Eve, says Public and Government Affairs Manager Ragina C. Averella. The last Tipsy?Taxi! service provided in Maryland was for July 4 of this year. The service was established in 2006, and it gave free taxi rides during popular holidays known for their partying. Averella says one of the main reasons for the suspension was lack of funding.
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