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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1997
A former Northeast High School teacher who was convicted in 1993 of sexually abusing three students and who talked on national television about sleeping with his students is seeking a new trial.Ronald W. Price is claiming he was ill-served by his two attorneys because they exploited his case "for personal financial gain, notoriety, press coverage and political advancement" that led to conflicts of interest, according to the petition filed yesterday in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court.He argues that they made other errors, such as not demanding a separate trial for each victim.
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NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | March 2, 1994
Timothy Cumberland, who faces a sentence of life in prison without parole for the shotgun killing of a Westminster man last year, has asked for a new trial.Cumberland claims in the new-trial motion that crucial defense evidence was unfairly kept from the Carroll Circuit Court jury that convicted him Feb. 8 of first-degree murder and conspiracy in the Jan. 28, 1993, shotgun death of Gregory Lamont Howard on South Center Street.Michael D. Montemarano said in the motion filed last week that Circuit Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr.'s rulings on evidence and instructions to the jury "denied the defendant a fair trial."
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | May 31, 1992
An Aberdeen man convicted of stabbing a man to death in 1990 has won a new trial after his lawyer argued that prosecutors "deliberately sabotaged" the defense by not notifying him of a witness who would testify.Ronald Lee Huff was to be sentenced Thursday in Harford Circuit Court. Instead, Harford Circuit Judge Stephen M. Waldron granted his request for a new trial. The trial has not been scheduled.The new trial opens the door for the prosecution to try Huff, 38, on all the original charges.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 9, 2004
NEW YORK - A federal judge refused yesterday to grant Martha Stewart a new trial, paving the way for the celebrity homemaker to be sentenced next week for lying about a stock sale. Judge Miriam Goldman Cedarbaum, in U.S. District Court in Manhattan, brushed aside claims by Stewart and her former stockbroker that their convictions are tainted by charges that a Secret Service ink expert lied on the witness stand. "Because there is no reasonable likelihood that this perjury could have affected the jury's verdict, and because overwhelming independent evidence supports the verdict, the motions are denied," Cedarbaum wrote.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer Staff Writer Carol L. Bowers contributed to this story | May 15, 1992
BEL AIR -- A court stenographer's error recording a jury verdict has landed Willie "Chico" Williams a new trial.Williams was convicted two years ago of first-degree murder in the slaying of a Washington man. The trial was held in Harford County Circuit Court and a state appeals court's order for a new trial has Joseph Cassilly fuming.Mr. Cassilly, the Harford County state's attorney, says the county courts now may have to spend up to $20,000 to retry Williams. "Something is wrong here," Mr. Cassilly said.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff Writer | May 16, 1995
The assistant state's attorney who prosecuted Nathaniel Hurt says the 62-year-old East Baltimore man does not deserve a new trial in the killing of a young neighbor despite a contention that the jury heard improper statements and testimony.Responding to a motion to grant Hurt a new trial, prosecutor Mark P. Cohen defended a remark he made during closing arguments that defense attorney Stephen L. Miles said could have misled the jury.Hurt was convicted of involuntary manslaughter and use of a handgun in a felony or crime of violence in the Oct. 10, 1994, shooting of 13-year-old Vernon Lee Holmes Jr., who was among a group of boys Hurt said was tormenting him. Hurt testified that he fired four shots from his second-story fire escape in the 800 block of E. North Ave. to scare the youths away.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Sun Staff Writer | May 4, 1994
A Harford County man convicted almost three years ago on charges of murder, kidnapping and attempted rape in the 1990 death of a 21-year-old Army clerk is back in Baltimore County court for a new trial.Daniel E. Turner, 35, of Aberdeen was sentenced to life in prison with out parole in June 1991 by Circuit Judge Alfred L. Brennan Sr. after a jury found him guilty in the death of Bonnie Sue Joseph. She had disappeared during an early-morning trip to a convenience store for snacks and other items for her Aberdeen Proving Ground co-workers.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | December 1, 2009
A three-judge panel of Maryland's Court of Special Appeals on Monday tossed out the conviction of a man found guilty of murder last year in Baltimore County Circuit Court and ordered that he be tried again. Thomas B. Harris was accused of fatally stabbing another man, Karim Cross, in the parking lot of the Rush Hour Bar in Randallstown in the early hours of Aug. 13, 2006. A jury convicted Harris of second-degree murder and in May 2008 he was sentenced to 15 years in prison. In his appeal, Harris, 35, questioned his conviction on various grounds, but the appeals court found cause for reversal in only one of his arguments: that the trial court abused its discretion when it refused to declare a mistrial after it became known that the defense had not been informed of a communication between a juror and the trial judge's secretary.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 15, 1992
JACKSON, Miss. -- Three years ago, in an attempt to heal old wounds, officials reopened one of the most searing cases from the Civil Rights era: the 1963 assassination of the civil rights leader Medgar Evers.Today, the Mississippi Supreme Court hears arguments that could rip those wounds open once again.The question is whether a new murder trial of his accused assassin, Byron De La Beckwith, a 71-year-old white supremacist, should go forward or whether the murder charges, filed in 1990, should be dismissed.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Anne Arundel Bureau of The Sun | April 9, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The Court of Appeals ordered a new trial yesterday for Sandra A. Craig, the Clarksville day-care operator who was convicted of child abuse in a 1987 trial that featured closed-circuit television testimony from four of her alleged victims.That testimony, Maryland's highest court held, should not have been allowed until Judge Raymond J. Kane Jr., the trial judge, interviewed the children to decide whether they would have difficulty communicating from the witness stand.Dwight Thompson, deputy state's attorney for Howard County, said he would have to talk with the victims and their parents before deciding whether to retry Mrs. Craig.
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