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NEWS
September 19, 2011
The state is planning a new building in Prince George's County to house the state Department of Housing and Community Development, Gov. Martin O'Malley announced Monday. The agency, which employs 385 workers, will move from Crownsville to New Carrollton next fall, O'Malley and Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown said. The new building, to be called Metroview, is to be built near the Orange Line and the proposed Purple Line of the Washington Metro. O'Malley called it a "modern investment" that will "allow us to do the right thing for reducing traffic and sprawl, the right thing for our quality of life, and the right thing for our land, our water, and our air. " Metroview is to be developed by Carl Williams of Grand Central Development, the governor's office said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2014
The Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance on Friday introduced CultureFly.org, a new site to promote Baltimore-area arts organizations. The site features event, attraction and dining listings, recommendations and discounts. It's scalable to various user devices and uses geolocation and intuitive search functions. "Baltimore has an exciting and growing number of cultural events for residents and visitors alike," executive director Jeannie Howe said in a news release. "As the region's unified voice for the arts and creative community, we wanted to help people navigate through the evolving Baltimore arts scene and discover new cultural experiences.
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NEWS
June 10, 2014
The Maryland Renaissance Festival is seeking a zoning approval to move to a new property in southern Anne Arundel County. The festival and property owner Michael Booth will appear before a county hearing officer on Thursday to make the case for a variance to allow the festival to be located on Upper Pindell Road in Lothian, which is designated as a scenic and historic road and lacks required direct main road access. They also are seeking a special zoning exception, which is required for renaissance festivals, and are also seeking . They also want approval to run the festival for 23 days each fall, up from the current 19 days.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
The Maryland Renaissance Festival organizers have appealed a zoning decision that prevents the festival from moving to a new site in southern Anne Arundel County. Earlier this month, the county's administrative hearing officer denied requests from the festival for a special exception and variances to allow the festival to operate on a Lothian farm that lacks required "major road" access. The case now moves to the county's seven-member Board of Appeals. A hearing has not yet been scheduled.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2011
The Howard County Board of Education on Tuesday approved a new site to be considered for construction of an elementary school in Elkridge, giving an alternative to a previously proposed site that raised concerns about proximity to a MARC rail commuter line and a proposed CSX rail cargo transfer station. The new site, on Ducketts Lane adjacent to U.S. 1, is 10.1 acres and will include space for a ball field and multipurpose field. Howard school officials said a permit is required from the state Department of the Environment and the Army Corps of Engineers to fill in wetlands.
MOBILE
May 23, 2013
More than a year-and-a-half ago, The Baltimore Sun stopped offering the app you are using right now. On May 23, the app was retired to coincide with the launch of our new mobile-optimized site. You may visit this new site at http://touch.baltimoresun.com . The site, accessible via any modern Web browser, was specially built for touchscreens and automatically adjusts to whatever smartphone or tablet you are using. Access to the “touch” site content follows the same model as our desktop site.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts bHC UxB | January 28, 1992
Baltimore officials have chosen a possible site to which to move the city's police headquarters and are hiring a space-planning consultant to determine whether it is feasible.In a breakfast meeting with reporters yesterday, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said he has "all but decided" that renovating the headquarters building at 601 E. Fayette St., which has air-conditioning and asbestos problems, "is not the way to go."Mr. Schmoke said he has a first choice for a new site for the headquarters from a field of three but is not ready to identify it at this time.
NEWS
By Ed McDonough and Ed McDonough,Staff writer | June 30, 1991
Plans for a county equestrian show ring are on hold while a new siteis being evaluated.The original site, on the northern tip of theproposed Union Mills Reservoir north of Westminster, was deemed unacceptable because of wetlands regulations, said John P. Little, countyrecreation and parks director.Now, the county's Equestrian Recreation Council is studying another nearby site, one with no apparent wetlands concerns. But the alternative site is a wooded area, and trees would have to be cut down andthe stumps removed for the ring, Little said.
NEWS
By Traci Johnson Mathena and Traci Johnson Mathena,Contributing Writer | July 10, 1995
Westminster Volunteer Fire Department is negotiating for a new site to replace its 99-year-old Main Street fire station, Fire Department President James Bangerd III said.The New Grounds Committee, a 10-member panel investigating the fire company's renovation and relocation options, is preparing a proposal for a new site and larger community facility that may cost between $3 million and $4 million to build. The fire company's membership would have to approve the plans before purchase of the site and construction.
FEATURES
By Kim Hart and Kim Hart,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2005
Baltimore's cultural institutions have heard all the complaints. It's too hard to find things to do around town, or even worse, there's nothing to do at all. Today, the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance is hoping to put an end to the excuses. The GBCA's new site - www.BaltimoreFunGuide.com - features a detailed calendar listing cultural events and activities at about 280 venues throughout the region. Each Thursday, subscribers will receive an e-mail containing up to six offers for half-price tickets and admissions to plays, galleries, museums, concerts and sporting events.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
Nearly three months after the Maryland health exchange decided to ditch its online marketplace for a new website, the exchange board has hired a small Greenbelt firm to check its work. The board voted Tuesday to award Angarai International Inc., a professional management consulting firm, a one-year contract for $3.55 million to audit technology development and management on the site. Isabel FitzGerald, who was brought in to oversee the tech operation when the first website failed, said this firm is expected to be "more proactive" than the previous one, "so we don't wait for a report.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
Pregnant and about to lose her health insurance, Genevieve Acker was eager to buy new coverage on the Maryland health exchange. But seven weeks after she picked plans on the Maryland Health Connection, she remained without insurance cards for herself, her husband and 2-year-old daughter. The insurer she picked told her it was never notified by the exchange, which kept telling Acker the problem would be fixed. "I got the runaround time and time again," said the New Market resident.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Days after the federal government abandoned plans to house immigrant children in a Baltimore office building, the Obama administration has begun to explore other sites in Maryland, including one in Prince George's County, documents obtained by The Baltimore Sun show. On Tuesday, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services evaluated a former residential drug treatment facility in Upper Marlboro with a storied past as the administration struggles to find enough shelter space to contain the recent surge in unaccompanied children crossing the nation's Southwest border.
NEWS
June 10, 2014
The Maryland Renaissance Festival is seeking a zoning approval to move to a new property in southern Anne Arundel County. The festival and property owner Michael Booth will appear before a county hearing officer on Thursday to make the case for a variance to allow the festival to be located on Upper Pindell Road in Lothian, which is designated as a scenic and historic road and lacks required direct main road access. They also are seeking a special zoning exception, which is required for renaissance festivals, and are also seeking . They also want approval to run the festival for 23 days each fall, up from the current 19 days.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | May 1, 2014
Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler's campaign for governor launched a new web site Thursday with the sole purpose of criticizing Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, the front-runner in the June 24 Democratic primary. The new site,  http://thebuckdoesntstophere.com/ , focuses mostly on Brown's role in the botched implementation of Maryland's health insurance exchange web site. The new Gansler campaign site is distinct from the campaign's main web site,  http://douggansler.com/ , which delivers a largely positive message about the attorney general's record.  The new site, with the headline "The Buck Doesn't Stop With Anthony Brown," concentrates on the theme that the lieutenant governor is trying to evade responsibility for the troubled rollout.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | April 21, 2014
Two new sites have been added to Lower Susquehanna Heritage Greenway's 14th annual River Sweep, a volunteer shoreline and roadside clean-up in honor of Earth Day, that takes place on April 26 from 9 a.m. to noon, rain or shine. The National Historic Tome School, on what was the Bainbridge Naval Training Center in Port Deposit, is a new location this year, as is Conowingo Creek Boat Launch in Conowingo. Other River Sweep sites include locations in Havre de Grace, Perryville, Port Deposit and Garrett Island.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
Pregnant and about to lose her health insurance, Genevieve Acker was eager to buy new coverage on the Maryland health exchange. But seven weeks after she picked plans on the Maryland Health Connection, she remained without insurance cards for herself, her husband and 2-year-old daughter. The insurer she picked told her it was never notified by the exchange, which kept telling Acker the problem would be fixed. "I got the runaround time and time again," said the New Market resident.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2000
Building a new Mayo Elementary School across the street from where it has stood for 64 years would cost more and take at least two years longer than demolishing the school and rebuilding it in place, according to an environmental review released yesterday. The 15 acres across the street is "developable," wrote consultants for KCI Technologies, but any one of several state agencies could deny the Anne Arundel County school board permission to build on the environmentally sensitive portions of land, now owned by the Mayo Civic Association and the St. Andrew the Fisherman Church.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
Republicans in Annapolis continue their push to get more information about what went wrong with the state's troubled health exchange website, and to scrap the site entirely. Maryland Senate Minority Leader David Brinkley called for an independent investigation, but was told in a letter from Attorney General Douglas Gansler that his office lacked the authority. Gansler, a gubernatorial candidate, said he too was concerned that "the taxpayers of Maryland had been poorly served by the executive branch's mismanagement of health care reform implementation," and reiterated comments he made earlier about exploring recovery of taxpayer dollars from contractors.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
After the state severed ties with the contractor that built its problem-plagued health insurance exchange, officials face the looming question of what to do with it - continue throwing money toward fixing it or replace it. Every option is potentially fraught with more technical headaches and expense. Exchange officials are mulling five possible scenarios in the wake of the disastrous launch of the exchange, where technical difficulties have thwarted thousands of people from signing up for health insurance.
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