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New Rules

NEWS
February 13, 2012
What's most troubling about the Baltimore Police Department's new rules regarding the public videotaping of police is that any new rules were required in the first place. The notion that some cadre of uniformed officers - perhaps even a majority - mistakenly believed until recently they have every right to confiscate the cell phone and delete the recordings of someone who did nothing more than tape an arrest in a public place is chilling to say the least. Not that one expects a city police officer to be a Constitutional scholar, but this isn't a Harvard Law School moment.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann | February 10, 2012
Baltimore police have issued new rules governing how officers deal with a public increasingly armed with cameras and video records, saying that in most instances, cops cannot stop people from filming crime scenes. The general orders, issued in November and made public Friday, come days ahead of a federal court hearing in a civil suit brought by a man who says an officer confiscated his cell phone camera and deleted images of an arrest at the Preakness Stakes in 2010. The rule state, in part: "No member of the Baltimore Police Department may prevent or prohibit any peson's ability to observe, photograph and/or make a video recording ... of police activity that occurs in the public domain.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2012
If Baltimore City schools and Basketball Academy officials have their way, the popular event will return to a college campus next year. Because of NCAA regulations banning "nonscholastic" high school basketball events from Division I college campuses, this week's 16 t h Annual Basketball Academy had to be moved from Coppin State to Lake Clifton. Basketball Academy officials, however, believe their event is a scholastic event. "I feel very confident we'll be back on a college campus," said Bob Wade, coordinator of athletics for the Baltimore City Public Schools.
NEWS
January 3, 2012
Whether casting a line in a Maryland stream or a lake in the most remote reaches of this country, a fisherman would be hard-pressed to catch a fish that does not contain mercury. Indeed, most recent studies suggest that it might be impossible. Is this a new development? Not really. It's been true for years, and states post warnings - most often directed at children and pregnant or nursing women - to limit their intake of fish for this very reason. A lot of saltwater fish (particularly those that prey on other fish, like shark and swordfish)
NEWS
December 23, 2011
Jeremy Schwarz's op-ed piece contrasting unemployment insurance and welfare makes several points that don't bear up under scrutiny ("Unemployment benefits are not like welfare," Dec. 21). He's correct that people pay insurance to protect themselves in case of an adverse event; however, workers do not pay for unemployment insurance. Unlike Social Security and Medicare and Medicaid, to which both employers and employees contribute, unemployment insurance is paid entirely by the employer.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 13, 2011
Barely three weeks from now, on Jan. 3, Republicans will start the quest for their 2012 presidential nominee in Iowa's precinct caucuses. Already the winnowing process among the candidates has begun, with the "suspension" of Herman Cain's ill-fated campaign. The process will continue for the survivors after Iowa, unless one of them unexpectedly scores an early knockout, as the well-heeled Mitt Romney had first hoped. But with the pendulum seemingly swinging Newt Gingrich's way lately, Mr. Romney will now be relying on his better-financed and better-organized campaign to check the former House speaker's unexpected momentum.
NEWS
By Tom Vilsack | December 12, 2011
Whether it was on my "rural tour" of states throughout the country or at workshops with the Department of Justice to discuss competition in agriculture, time and again, livestock and poultry producers have emphasized the need for a fair and competitive industry and workable, common-sense rules to address bad actors. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recently finalized a rule to implement the 2008 Farm Bill to help remedy some of these concerns. In the last 30 years, the livestock and poultry marketplace has not only become more concentrated but also more vertically integrated.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2011
State officials are plowing ahead with new rules on how and when farmers can fertilize their fields, despite last-minute objections from environmentalists that the proposed limits have been weakened in an apparent bid to mollify agricultural interests. The state Department of Agriculture plans to publish proposed changes to its "nutrient management" regulations on Dec. 2 in the Maryland Register, spokeswoman Julianne Oberg said in an email. State officials have said the new rules, which deal with the spreading of animal manure and sewage sludge on farm fields, are intended to reduce polluted runoff from farms as part of Maryland's effort to restore the Chesapeake Bay. Among the proposed changes are a ban on putting down any fertilizer in winter and tighter limits in the fall, requiring farmers to store their animals' waste until spring or find other uses for it. The changes were generally welcomed by environmental groups when first announced three weeks ago. Some activists, notably former state Sen. Gerald Winegrad of Annapolis, thought they were still far too weak, but others saw them as a good first step toward tackling agricultural pollution.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2011
During an emotional hearing Friday, the Maryland Public Service Commission adopted new regulations intended to prevent accidental electrocutions like the one that killed 14-year-old Deanna Green at a church softball game in Druid Hill Park more than five years ago. The requirements will force state electric companies to find — and eliminate — dangerous "contact voltage" in public objects that can transmit electricity, such as streetlights, traffic...
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | October 26, 2011
Bernard Pollard was flagged for a 15-yard unnecessary roughness penalty described by referee Carl Ceffers as a helmet-to-helmet hit on a defenseless receiver in the third quarter of the Ravens' 12-7 loss to the Jacksonville Jaguars Monday night. But coach John Harbaugh defended the hit as being legal and Pollard said he has yet to receive a letter from the NFL informing him of a fine, which is usually a result for players cited for such a penalty. But the starting strong safety sounded off on the league's rules on contact, saying the limitations could have an adverse effect on how defensive players tackle their offensive counterparts.
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