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NEWS
December 27, 2012
While the restoration of the Chesapeake Bay requires attention from all the half-dozen states in the 64,000-square-mile watershed, there is one step that must be taken almost entirely by one state alone. When the Virginia Assembly reconvenes for its annual 45-day legislative session in January, it needs to impose a strict quota on the harvest of menhaden. Perhaps no species is more important to the bay — and to the major East Coast fisheries in general — than the lowly menhaden, a small, oily fish that is familiar to Maryland anglers primarily as bait.
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BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | December 13, 2012
Maryland's casinos will be allowed to open 24 hours a day under new regulations approved Thursday by the Maryland Lottery and Gaming Control Commission that also relaxed limits on ATMs and lending to gamblers in the facilities. With the advent of full-scale casino gambling in Maryland after voters approved table games in the November election, the commission is updating the regulatory regime and relaxing some restrictions. The changes also added new rules, including some governing junkets that casinos provide to high-rolling gamblers.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Aaron Wilson | November 20, 2012
Ravens safety Ed Reed said that he was grateful that his one-game suspension for repeated violations of the rule prohibiting hits to the head and neck area of defenseless players was lifted Tuesday after his appeal. As a result, Reed will be on the field Sunday against the San Diego Chargers. However Reed was assessed a $50,000 fine for his hit on Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Emmanuel Sanders in the third quarter of the Ravens 13-10 victory. defended his style of play, acknowledged that there is a “fine line” between protecting players and not taking away from the game and said the new rules and fines are creating a “flag football thing.” “The rules of the game have changed a whole lot since I got in the league,” said Reed after distributing turkeys to families of Booker T. Washington Middle School along with teammates Cary Williams and Anquan Boldin.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
Howard County planners are pushing new rules that would allow developers to depart from existing zoning in exchange for providing benefits to the community. The county planning chief said the change was needed to adapt to conditions that have changed since land-use rules were established. But community activists are raising alarms about uncontrolled growth and worry the plan would give developers too much leeway and the administration too much power. The Department of Planning and Zoning proposes what's called a community enhancement floating district in the more developed eastern part of the county, where no large tracts of open land exist.
NEWS
Matthew Hay Brown | September 18, 2012
Rep. Chris Van Hollen called a federal court ruling allowing tax-exempt groups to conceal the identies of their donors “a blow against transparency in the funding of political campaigns.” The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia on Tuesday reversed a lower court ruling that directed such groups, which are spending millions of dollars on campaign advertising this election season, to name their donors. “The Court of Appeals' decision today will keep the American people, for the time being, in the dark about who is attempting to influence their vote with secret money,” Van Hollen said in a statement.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | September 1, 2012
Johnny Unitas, considered by many to have been the greatest quarterback of all time, will be inducted posthumously into the Maryland State Athletic Hall of Fame with six others at the 53rd enshrinement ceremony Nov. 8 at Michael's 8th Avenue in Glen Burnie. Unitas, the Pro Football Hall of Famer who led the Baltimore Colts to NFL championships in 1958 and 1959 and Super Bowl V in 1971 over 17 seasons with the team, will be honored along with golf legend Carol Mann as a result of a change in the organization's by-laws.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
Spurred by the conviction of a former councilman and the indictment of County Executive John R. Leopold, Anne Arundel County lawmakers unanimously pushed forward new rules Monday to oust elected officials convicted of crimes. Voters will decide in November whether to approve rules that require a vote of five council members to remove another politician from office and strip that politician of pension benefits. While one provision sets up a process to remove councilmen, the other tweaks an existing process to remove a county executive.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2012
The start of the 2012-13 college basketball season is more than five months away, but practice begins today. It's only two hours a week over an eight-week summer period, according to a new NCAA rule. Yet for local coaches, it's a chance to acclimate several new players and reinforce what they've taught to those returning. "When you're bringing in seven new guys, and you have four returning scholarship players, this is huge for us," Maryland coach Mark Turgeon said last week.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 9, 2012
New farm regulations being aired this week by Maryland officials would ease first-ever limits on how, when and where the state's farmers can spread animal manure and sewage sludge on their fields. The " nutrient management" rules , which were posted online Wednesday, have been revised by state officials in response to widespread complaints when they were first floated last summer. A scientist who reviewed them calls them a major step forward in the long-running effort to restore the Chesapeake Bay. But farming and local government groups remain concerned about the potential costs, while environmentalists are split on whether they go far enough to curb farm pollution.
BUSINESS
Yvonne Wenger | May 4, 2012
Housing experts say homeowners can wait as long as nine months to get approval to sell their home as a short sale, and efforts are underway to push lenders to give a prompt answer. HouseLogic says homebuyers may find themselves in the position of having to send multiple requests to their lender to ask for approval for them to sell their house for less than they owe while a potential buyer waits in the wings. HouseLogic, a service offered by the National Association of Realtors, provides information on homeownership, such as taxes and insurance.
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