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NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2001
PRESTON - The familiar orange - white - and - black trucks that spread this town's name from coast to coast no longer ply its tree-lined streets. It's been two years since Preston Trucking Co. Inc. stunned the inhabitants of this slow-paced Eastern Shore community, laying off 295 workers, declaring bankruptcy and closing down after 67 years. For workers who had come to expect lifetime jobs, who considered themselves part of a close-knit corporate family, the news hit like a punch. Today, as with any family that's suffered a loss, folks in Preston have mostly recovered from the shock of losing their economic mainstay - but the scars remain.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2012
It's not a matter of "if" but "when. " Medifast Inc., the No. 3 manufacturer of weight-loss food products, is growing so quickly in that industry that there will soon come a time when it outgrows its sole production facility in Owings Mills and builds plants elsewhere. To keep up with that rapid growth, Medifast plans on making $5 million in improvements to its headquarters and plant in Owings Mills over the next two years. But it's also considering other sites for the future, including a possible West Coast manufacturing site and one in Mexico to serve the growing Latin American market.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
SKW Constructors plans to hire up to 100 people to construct concrete tubes and fans at the Sparrows Point Shipyard and Industrial park in Dundalk, according to Baltimore County economic development officials. Subcontractors are expected to hire additional people to work on the project, including carpenters, mechanics, surveyors and truck drivers, the county said. "This project is a huge boost in our efforts to bring new businesses and new jobs back to Sparrows Point," Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2012
Workers peered through safety goggles as they fitted together parts of the electric motors they were building on a General Motors assembly line in White Marsh. For now, the parts are made in a factory in Mexico and then shipped to Baltimore County for assembly. But not for long. By the end of the year, motors for cutting-edge electric vehicles will be built from scratch in a sprawling $244 million plant under construction next to GM's factory, now called General Motors Baltimore Operations.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2009
An Indianapolis-based appliance and electronics retailer plans to open a 300,000-square-foot distribution center in Prince George's County with help from the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development. The company, hhgregg, plans to open 40 to 45 stores in the Mid-Atlantic region in the 2011 fiscal year, and the distribution center is expected to create 100 new jobs when it opens in Brandywine, according to DBED. The company has stores across the southeastern United States.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
Maryland's approximately 30,000 nonprofits range from the smallest all-volunteer organizations to the largest private employer in the state. Greg Cantori loves them all. As CEO of Maryland Nonprofits since October, he's in his self-described dream job, running one of the nation's largest state associations for nonprofits after 20 years of working in the local sector. He recently chatted with The Baltimore Sun about challenges facing nonprofits and how they're coping. How much are federal budget pressures affecting local nonprofits?
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | May 15, 2013
My mother went into paid work soon after my father's clothing store was flooded out in a hurricane, almost wiping him out. She had no choice. We needed the money. This was some two decades before a tidal wave of wives and mothers went into paid work. For the relatively few women with four-year college degrees, this change was the consequence of wider educational opportunity and new laws against gender discrimination that opened professions to well-educated women. But the vast majority of women entered the paid workforce because male wages were dropping.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2010
The long-anticipated BRAC boom — the new jobs, offices and ripple economic effects — are finally on the way. The Army will transfer nearly 1,500 jobs to Aberdeen Proving Ground in August and September, according to the state. That would nearly double the number that have moved to Harford County because of the national military base realignment and closure process, or BRAC, announced in 2005. Thousands more jobs, many of them unfilled, are expected to follow. Government contractors are gearing up, too. Offices are opening in Harford County at a fast clip — three dozen during the past year.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | June 6, 2012
However one looks at last Friday's jobs report, it's a stunning reminder of how anemic the recovery has been -- and how perilously close America is to falling into another recession. Not only has the unemployment rate risen for the first time in almost a year, to 8.2 percent, but, more ominously, May's payroll survey showed that employers created only 69,000 net new jobs. The Labor Department's Bureau of Labor Statistics also revised its March and April reports downward. Only 96,000 new jobs have been created, on average, over the last three months.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
The owners of the Sparrows Point steel mill plan to raze the closed plant, Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said Thursday, as political leaders from Towson to Washington mourned the loss of a landmark that once employed tens of thousands. The officials, including Gov. Martin O'Malley, vowed to help steelworkers who have lost their jobs. But the head of United Steelworkers Local 9477 was angry that a key part of the plant is being sold to North Carolina-based Nucor Corp. — to be used for spare parts.
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