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NEWS
By David Horsey | May 6, 2014
After six decades of doing business in California, Toyota is moving its North American headquarters to Texas. That means 3,000 of the carmaker's jobs will be leaving Torrance and going to Plano, perhaps convincing California officials they should stop Texas Gov. Rick Perry at the border the next time he attempts to come to the Golden State for another raid on businesses. Toyota's surprise relocation will throw more gasoline on the burning argument about which state is a better economic model for the nation. California and Texas, two giant, powerhouse states that could stand on their own among the world's biggest economies, are seen as the perfect contrast between a high-regulation blue state and a low regulation red state.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2012
Workers peered through safety goggles as they fitted together parts of the electric motors they were building on a General Motors assembly line in White Marsh. For now, the parts are made in a factory in Mexico and then shipped to Baltimore County for assembly. But not for long. By the end of the year, motors for cutting-edge electric vehicles will be built from scratch in a sprawling $244 million plant under construction next to GM's factory, now called General Motors Baltimore Operations.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Staff | January 30, 2000
Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, working mother, starts her day in much the same way the rest of Maryland's working mothers do: Scrambling to send off her children with full stomachs and light hearts, to conduct their day beyond her protective reach. Kate leaves first. She's a 16-year-old junior at Towson High and is logging the hours she needs to earn her license by driving her mother to school. When Kate gets her license, this ritual won't be necessary. Another little bit of letting go. But Townsend is as excited about this milestone as her daughter might be. "It is such an exciting time in a young person's life.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
SKW Constructors plans to hire up to 100 people to construct concrete tubes and fans at the Sparrows Point Shipyard and Industrial park in Dundalk, according to Baltimore County economic development officials. Subcontractors are expected to hire additional people to work on the project, including carpenters, mechanics, surveyors and truck drivers, the county said. "This project is a huge boost in our efforts to bring new businesses and new jobs back to Sparrows Point," Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said in a statement.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2011
Medical waste disposal company Daniels Sharpsmart Inc. said Friday it has opened a facility in East Baltimore. The facility, which became fully operational this month, will serve hospitals, clinics, medical and dental offices in Maryland, Washington, D.C., Delaware and Pennsylvania from the plant. The company said in a release that it was attracted to the area in part because of the quality of the region's hospitals. The company is known for its Sharpsmart system which allows for the safe disposal of needles and other sharp objects.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
Maryland's approximately 30,000 nonprofits range from the smallest all-volunteer organizations to the largest private employer in the state. Greg Cantori loves them all. As CEO of Maryland Nonprofits since October, he's in his self-described dream job, running one of the nation's largest state associations for nonprofits after 20 years of working in the local sector. He recently chatted with The Baltimore Sun about challenges facing nonprofits and how they're coping. How much are federal budget pressures affecting local nonprofits?
BUSINESS
February 24, 2010
Limbach Company LLC, a Pittsburgh-based mechanical construction and service firm, is expanding its regional office and fabrication facility in Maryland and plans to create 75 new jobs over the next three years. Gov. Martin O'Malley and Prince George's County Executive Jack Johnson announced Tuesday that the company is moving effective March 1 from Lanham to a 40,000-square-foot space in the Brick Yard Business Park in Beltsville. The new location will allow the company to add 75 employees to its 150 workers, state officials say. Maryland's Department of Business and Economic Development has offered the company a $100,000 loan to assist with the cost of improving its new building.
BUSINESS
By Merrill Goozner and Merrill Goozner,Chicago Tribune | May 29, 1994
TOKYO -- Amid all the ballyhoo about the current downturn being Japan's worst since the end of World War II, a simple fact has been overlooked: The Japanese economy continues to add jobs at a healthy clip.The jobs are coming from expected quarters: restaurants, discount retailers and other parts of a booming service sector that shows little sign of cooling off.New housing aimed at the young and spacially constrained has been another source of sustenance for hungry job seekers. Despite a sharp falloff in industrial and commercial construction, building companies have continued to add jobs over the last year as housing starts reached their highest level in three years.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | May 15, 2013
My mother went into paid work soon after my father's clothing store was flooded out in a hurricane, almost wiping him out. She had no choice. We needed the money. This was some two decades before a tidal wave of wives and mothers went into paid work. For the relatively few women with four-year college degrees, this change was the consequence of wider educational opportunity and new laws against gender discrimination that opened professions to well-educated women. But the vast majority of women entered the paid workforce because male wages were dropping.
NEWS
June 22, 2014
Letter writer Jennifer Kunze ( "Md. ought to have cleaner air," June 17) is absolutely correct. We can and should have cleaner air. Maryland's legislature should step up its efforts to move our state toward a clean energy economy. The solar industry in Maryland is actually creating new jobs at a much faster rate than the dirty coal industry here without adding any pollution to the air we all breathe. In fact, U.S. solar jobs are growing ten times faster than the national average employment growth.
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