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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1996
Defying rising mortgage rates and economists' expectations, sales of new homes shot to the highest rate in a decade in May, the U.S. Commerce Department said yesterday. But Baltimore's sluggish sales ran counter to the national surge.Nationally, sales of new homes jumped 7.5 percent to an annual rate of 828,000 from April to May, the Commerce Department said.But in Baltimore and the five surrounding counties, sales dropped for single-family homes, townhouses and condominiums during the same period -- 18 percent overall, said Washington-based Housing Data Reports Inc., which tracks the new-homes market in Washington and Baltimore.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
If the spirit of the Bard were to appear to the members of the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company in their terrific new home, he'd surely quote one of his lines from "The Tempest": "Be merry; you have cause. " There is abundant reason for high spirits during the venue's inaugural production, "A Midsummer Night's Dream. The troupe's downtown Baltimore theater, formed out of a handsome 19th-century bank building that deserved the makeover, is a lively place, visually and atmospherically.
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BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2010
Your home is your castle — but even a palace would be unpleasant if it's drafty, leaky or crumbling. Under state law, new homes built in Maryland are protected by a one-year warranty, and they're guaranteed against structural defects for two years. This coverage can help buyers who discover defects after they move in. But persistence will be required, as Thomas Brower and his parents discovered. Their builder, Ryland Homes, had fixed several problems, such as a leaky gas fireplace, on the Rosedale house they bought in August.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
At first, Baldwin Homes didn't build green. Then it dipped its corporate toe in - one home here, another there. Now the Gambrills company is constructing an entire green neighborhood. It's the story of U.S. home building writ small. Green accounted for 2 percent of the new-home market in 2005, according to a report by industry data provider McGraw Hill Construction. By last year it had ballooned to 23 percent - nearly a quarter. "I don't think green is a niche market anymore," said Michele A. Russo, director of green content at McGraw Hill Construction.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2010
A zoning change granted late Friday will enable descendants of Charles Carroll of Carrolton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, to build hundreds of new homes on a portion of Doughoregan Manor, their Colonial-era Ellicott City estate, while preserving the rest of the 892-acre property. The Howard County Council is due to vote Thursday on the final element of the complex arrangement: a contract that lays out all the elements of the deal between Camilla and Philip D. Carroll and the county.
BUSINESS
By Adele Evans | September 29, 2002
Phillips Fields Ten home sites remain for sale at Phillips Fields, a 26-lot development of luxury single-family homes by NV Homes in Parkton. The Colonial-style homes offered have two stories, four bedrooms, two or three full bathrooms and one half-bath. There are nine floor plans encompassing 2,491 to 5,000 square feet. Priced from $380,990 to $500,000, the homes will be on 1- to 3-acre lots. Standard features include family rooms, gas fireplaces and two-car, side-entry garages. The model will be open next month.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2012
The sluggish housing market and the ensuing decline in school enrollment has the Carroll County Commissioners considering a proposal to drop impact fees on new home construction for the next few years. The county collects the fees on residential construction to offset the growth-related costs of building the schools and other infrastructure needed to meet the demands of new residents. The fees, which depend on the size of a new home and can be as much as $6,000, pay to build new schools and parks and provide recreation.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2010
Land once intended for a new Howard County government complex in Ellicott City will instead be the site of 163 townhouses, according to a developer's plan scheduled for presentation to the public Tuesday night. Ellicott Mills Overlook is the latest change in one of Howard County's oldest areas of suburban development, near U.S. 40. A 150-unit Alta at Regency Crest apartment complex for seniors is under construction on a former farm remnant across Rogers Avenue, and plans are to eventually redevelop the nearby Normandy Shopping Center and the adjacent former Miller Motors Ford dealership across the divided highway.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | November 3, 1994
Baltimore's new-homes market took a heavy hit during the third quarter, thanks to rising interest rates and weakened consumer confidence that has kept this year's sales dragging behind last year's.Sales of new homes in the region plunged 13 percent during July, August and September compared with last year, Legg Mason Realty Group Inc. said in a quarterly report released yesterday. Sales for the first nine months fell to 7,330, down 10 percent from the first three quarters of 1993, the report said.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | May 4, 1995
New-home sales in the Baltimore region fell nearly 19 percent during the first three months of the year to the lowest level of any first quarter in nine years, Legg Mason Realty Group Inc. said yesterday.Through the end of March, 2,455 new homes were sold in Baltimore and Baltimore, Anne Arundel, Carroll, Harford and Howard counties, down from the 3,017 homes sold in the first quarter of 1994, according to Legg Mason's quarterly Housing Market Profiles.That was the lowest since the first quarter of 1986, when fewer than 2,000 new homes were sold.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
Construction of new homes is lagging around the country, and Maryland is no exception. Permits for new homes, which the U.S. Census Bureau tracks as a barometer of the home-building industry, fell 8 percent in Maryland in the first six months of this year compared to the same period in 2013. The number of single-family detached homes authorized for construction fell 15 percent. That's worse than the country as a whole, where multifamily structures lifted permitting 5 percent through June.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
Last week's trade between the Chicago Cubs and the Oakland Athletics, which sent pitchers Jeff Samardzija and Jason Hammel to Oakland for a prospect package that includes top 10 prospect Addison Russell, kicked off the MLB trade season in spectacular fashion. This week, we'll go through the Orioles system level by level and highlight players of value who could have new homes by the July 31 nonwaiver trade deadline if the Orioles want to make a move.   High-A Frederick is where the Orioles can begin plucking the fruit of a strong 2013 draft for trade purposes, with some of the best-performing and more developmentally advanced players from that class getting their feet wet in the second half of the Carolina League.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
Last week's deal between the Chicago Cubs and Oakland Athletics, which sent pitchers Jeff Samardzija and Jason Hammel to Oakland for a prospect package that included top 10 prospect Addison Russell, kicked off baseball's trade season in spectacular fashion. This week, we'll go through the Orioles system level by level and highlight players of value who could have new homes by the July 31 non-waiver trade deadline if the Orioles want to make a move.   Like the Orioles' Triple-A affiliate in Norfolk, the Orioles Double-A affiliate in Bowie has a handful of valuable players amid a lineup of veteran minor leaguers and organizational filler.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
A popular midwife practice whose partnership with Mercy Medical Center is ending because of rising malpractice costs has found a new home at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. Kathleen Slone CNM & Associates will move to new offices on York Road this week and begin taking patients June 23. Mercy told the midwives in October it was severing ties after two high-profile medical malpractice cases, though unrelated directly to the hospital, had driven up the cost of insurance and that it was looking for ways to alleviate the financial pressure.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
Nearly three dozen dogs, all but one of them puppies, were found locked in crates without food or water in a Baltimore home Wednesday afternoon, authorities said. Animal Control found the 32 puppies and an adult dog in the home in the first block of North Tremont Rd. when they responded to a call from a neighbor reporting excessive barking. The man living in the home told authorities that he had bought the puppies, which ranged in breed but were around 8 weeks old, out-of-state and planned to sell them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
Grumblings seemed few as the 16th Maryland Film Festival wrapped up Sunday, having weathered a forced relocation to North Avenue and other nearby areas. "I've been really enjoying it," cinephile Greg Golinski said Saturday, about halfway through his planned 12-film visit to the festival. The event brought 50 feature films, 10 shorts programs, dozens of filmmakers and thousands of film lovers to Baltimore for the weekend. "Integrating it more into Station North, it's been fun," Golinski said of the move.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | December 22, 1993
There's no place like home for the holidays. And thanks to a $1 million federal grant, three Mayo families will be celebrating in new homes this Christmas."
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2014
A plan aimed at fixing a large number of failing household septic systems on Kent Island is stirring debate, as Queen Anne's County looks to permit roughly 600 new homes on the low-lying gateway to the Eastern Shore while hooking existing homes up to its sewer system. County officials say the $53 million state-financed sewer project, made possible by legislation passed this year, would resolve a long-standing public health and environmental problem while limiting how much new development can take place in an area virtually surrounded by the Chesapeake Bay. But opponents say the project flies in the face of Maryland's Smart Growth policies and rewards real estate speculators who've been sitting on unbuildable housing lots there for years.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | April 3, 2014
Way back in 1960, Harford County's population was a little more than 76,000, which, presuming an average of four people per house, translates to about 19,000 homes. When the building boom hit Harford County hard in the 1970s and especially the 1980s, local planning offices were issuing upward of 1,500 permits for new houses each year. Relative to what had been on the ground, that's a lot of new construction. In a community of 20,000 houses, 1,500 new ones amounts to about 7.5 percent of what had already been standing before construction started.
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