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NEWS
August 5, 1991
For much of this century, the 4th District, which straddles Baltimore's west side, was a major cultural, political and spiritual center of gravity for the struggle toward black empowerment, locally and nationally.In the years immediately following World War II, the 4th saw itself transformed into a major staging area for the modern civil rights movement. From there, the legendary Clarence Mitchell Jr. commuted to Washington each day to lobby Congress on behalf of the NAACP. It was also there that Carl Murphy's crusading Afro-American newspaper, then at the height of its influence, had its headquarters.
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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | August 5, 2013
Major Kimberly Burrus, the Northern District's new commander, wants what you want: to feel safe from crime in Baltimore. "I am a city resident," said Burrus, 40, a 13-year veteran of the Baltimore City Police Department and a first-time commander. "I was born and raised in the city. I should be able to walk out my door without getting a gun stuck in my face. " Burrus succeeds Major Sabrina Tapp-Harper, who was Northern District commander for two years and now heads the police department's Special Investigations Section.
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NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | October 29, 1992
Tom McMillen's lawn signs are cropping up on fellow Democrat Ben Cardin's turf. Registered voters in Mr. Cardin's district are showing up at rallies for Steny Hoyer.It isn't pretty, but neither is it the bedlam Anne Arundel County's political leaders predicted after last year's congressional redistricting.Anne Arundel, which had elected its own congressman since 1972, lost the tug of war for congressional seats and was sliced up and parceled out to four districts.In none of them does the county have a majority, even though it is the state's fifth-largest subdivision.
EXPLORE
January 12, 2013
  Gov. Martin O'Malley has appointed Brian David Green to the district court for Carroll County. Green has served as attorney with the Office of the Public Defender in Carroll County for the past 23 years, according to a press release from the governor's office. An adjunct professor for the Criminal Practice Clinic at the University of Baltimore School of Law, Green has also worked for the Shemer Bar Review since 1999, according to the release. He began his legal career as an assistant state's attorney in Baltimore City from 1987-1990.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | October 29, 1992
Tom McMillen's lawn signs are cropping up on fellow Democrat Ben Cardin's turf. Registered voters in Mr. Cardin's district are showing up at rallies for Steny Hoyer.It isn't pretty, but neither is it the bedlam Anne Arundel's political leaders predicted after last year's congressional redistricting.Anne Arundel, which had elected its own congressman since 1972, lost the tug of war for congressional seats and was sliced up and parceled out to four districts.In none of them does the county have a majority, even though it is the state's fifth-largest subdivision.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Staff Writer | March 24, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Anne Arundel Democrats and Republicans have asked the Supreme Court to nullify Maryland's redrawn congressional districts -- a set of political boundaries that split Anne Arundel County four ways.In an appeal yesterday that appears unlikely to be settled until after the November elections, the county's two party central committees claimed that the Maryland General Assembly adopted the plan last year "for purely political purposes."The new districting involves both racial and political "gerrymandering," the appeal contends.
NEWS
October 18, 2011
Maryland's legislature should take the time to develop congressional districts that make sense. Democratic officials have said that the current map was just a starting point from which to develop new districts, which sounds good on the surface. But if we continue to take that approach every 10 years, the congressional district maps will get more and more ridiculous. Surely the data and computer software are available, or can be reasonably developed, to lay out congressional districts that look reasonable on a map and that group constituents with similar interests together.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau Staff writers Fraser Smith and Nelson Schwartz contributed to this article | June 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court ruled for the first time yesterday that state legislatures may get into constitutional trouble by packing minority voters from scattered areas into a voting district, even if the aim is to give minorities more strength at the ballot box.In a 5-4 decision that raised a legal cloud over the wave of new districts drawn with black and ethnic majorities, the court put new but uncertain limits on "racial gerrymandering."The constitutional risk will arise, the court made clear, when a legislature draws a new district in an odd, meandering shape so that it reaches blacks who live in separate communities and even in different counties.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 20, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A host of congressional districts, mainly in the South, that were drawn specifically to be "safe" for black candidates appeared to be plunged into new constitutional difficulty during a Supreme Court hearing yesterday.Several justices who had cast key votes for a 1993 ruling that questioned the constitutionality of black-dominated districts shaped mainly by racial factors appear to have hardened their views since then.The implication of questions asked by those justices was that the court could be on the verge of expanding its 1993 decision to raise the constitutional barrier that legislatures must clear to give blacks new districts they can control politically.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman | September 13, 1991
With a special legislative session fast approaching, a controversial plan to redraw Maryland's congressional map is headed for changes.The five-member gubernatorial advisory committee, which released its plan last month to a chorus of grumbles, is expected to alter its proposed 1st District map to include the Dundalk and Essex areas of Baltimore County and offer Representative Benjamin L. Cardin, D-Md.-3rd, some additional city neighborhoods in his district, said a committee member and others close to the once-a-decade process.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | November 26, 2012
The Baltimore City and Baltimore County school districts have been named among 61 finalists nationwide to vie for millions in federal grants under the new Race to the Top program, the U.S. Dept. of Education announced Monday. The two school systems were among 372 from across the country to apply for the new district-level competition, which could award the city and county between $30 and $40 million to invest in innovative programs to address their achievement gaps. “These finalists are setting the curve for the rest of the country with innovative plans to drive education reform in the classroom,” U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said in a statement send by the department.  According to a release from the federal education department, the 2012 district-level competition--which follows a similar competition for states-- will allocate close to $400 million to "support locally developed plans to personalize learning and deepen student learning, directly improve student achievement and educator effectiveness, close achievement gaps, and prepare every student for success in college and careers.
NEWS
October 23, 2012
Maryland's congressional maps are a product of the politicians, for the politicians, by the politicians. They were born of the two competing desires of the state's Democratic Party bosses: to give incumbent Democrats the precincts they want to make their re-election efforts easier and to put one of the state's two Republican congressional seats at risk. They achieved their goals - Republican Rep. Roscoe Bartlett is facing his first serious challenge in years, and none of the incumbent Democrats is breaking a sweat.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley and the ruling Democrats in Annapolis worked hard to draw a new congressional map that could force a Western Maryland Republican from office. But the result is such a contorted tangle of districts that even some Democrats have declined to support it. The Democratic Central Committees for Montgomery and Prince George's counties - the state's two largest - decided not to make a recommendation to voters about whether they should vote for the map, which is on the ballot in November.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2011
Former Prince George's County State's Attorney Glenn F. Ivey filed the paperwork Thursday required to challenge incumbent Rep. Donna F. Edwards, setting up what is likely to be one of Maryland's most competitive Democratic primaries next year. Ivey, 50, won countywide elections in Prince George's in 2002 and 2006 by wide margins. He will be a formidable challenger in the 4th District, which now includes a large swath of central Anne Arundel County. Ivey has been in private practice since leaving the state's attorney's office in January.
NEWS
October 18, 2011
Maryland's legislature should take the time to develop congressional districts that make sense. Democratic officials have said that the current map was just a starting point from which to develop new districts, which sounds good on the surface. But if we continue to take that approach every 10 years, the congressional district maps will get more and more ridiculous. Surely the data and computer software are available, or can be reasonably developed, to lay out congressional districts that look reasonable on a map and that group constituents with similar interests together.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2011
Jim Schillinger, a fourth-generation farmer from Severn, has occasionally tussled with politicians who don't understand the first thing about crop yields or the rising cost of fertilizer. When he tries to explain his concerns, it's as if they don't speak his language. So when Schillinger studies the proposed boundaries for Maryland's eight congressional districts and sees that his 136-acre farm in Anne Arundel County would be lumped with densely populated Prince George's, it doesn't inspire confidence that his voice would be heard in Washington.
NEWS
October 21, 2012
Maryland's congressional maps are a product of the politicians, for the politicians, by the politicians. They were born of the two competing desires of the state's Democratic Party bosses: to give incumbent Democrats the precincts they want to make their re-election efforts easier, and to put one of the state's two Republican-held congressional seats at risk. They achieved their goals - Republican Rep. Roscoe Bartlett is facing his first serious challenge in years, and none of the incumbent Democrats is breaking a sweat.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
Two disparate groups suggested Friday that Maryland's proposed congressional map might illegally dilute the power of minority voters, though national experts warned that any potential lawsuit would face a high hurdle in federal court. A Prince George's County political action committee and a national watchdog group contend that the proposed districts do not adequately represent the state's black and Hispanic populations. The accusations came a day after Western Maryland Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett expressed similar concerns.
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