Advertisement
HomeCollectionsNeil Simon
IN THE NEWS

Neil Simon

NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
Now offering its fifth production since opening in the 2011-2012 season, Compass Rose Theater seems comfortably rooted in its strip-mall Eastport Shopping Center location. The cozy storefront lends an offbeat charm to the company's current offering, Neil Simon's 1963 comedy classic, "Barefoot in the Park. " This early play enjoyed success on Broadway before becoming a 1967 movie with Jane Fonda and Robert Redford. It came at the threshold of Simon's storied career, which ultimately included more Oscar and Tony nominations than any other writer's.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2010
The roots of "Sycamore Trees," the new musical by Ricky Ian Gordon, stretch deep into his own life. Spanning the last half of the 20th century, the work draws the audience into a family that is at once very specific and distinctive, yet one that reveals universal traits, experiences universal traumas and tragedies. This easy identification factor is one of the best things that "Sycamore Trees" has going for it. Another is the astutely cast, finely polished premiere production from Signature Theatre as part of its laudable "American Musical Voices Project" to commission new works.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | March 3, 2004
YOU CAN LEAD the culture-starved masses to the revived Hippodrome Theatre, but once you get them there you had better have something for them to nosh on. With that in mind, I ate lunch last week at the newly opened Hipp Cafe, a handsome, hustling, quick-bite kind of place that cozies up to the theater lobby. Sitting under spotlights and surrounded by black-and-white photos of the stars of stage and screen, I got a buzz on. The charge didn't come from my beverage - a glass of club soda - but from the room.
NEWS
April 19, 2002
South Carroll High School Stagelighters will present the musical Sweet Charity at 7:30 p.m. today and tomorrow in the school auditorium. Sweet Charity is an offbeat musical of the 1960s about Charity Hope Valentine, an eternal optimist looking for love despite repeated disappointment. The Neil Simon script features tunes by Cy Coleman and Dorothy Fields. Tickets are $5, and proceeds will benefit the drama club. The school is at 1300 W. Old Liberty Road in Winfield. Information: 410-751-3575.
NEWS
By Christina Stoehr | July 19, 1992
JTC THE GREAT ONE: THE LIFE AND LEGEND OF JACKIE GLEASON.William Henry III.Doubleday.321 pages. $22.50. When Jackie Gleason died on June 24, 1987, the TV networks scrambled to put together late-night video obituaries of his work and life. They came up with a lot of TV and movie clips but few people to speak fondly of him."The Great One: The Life and Legend of Jackie Gleason" reveals why. Gleason had to be one of the most reviled stars ever -- and with good reason, according to biographer William Henry III.Gleason was a mean-spirited drunk; a petty, insecure man who typically spent a half-hour on Christmas Day with his wife and daughters before going off to party with drinking companions; a drinker who thought it was hilarious to throw up on people; a man who once paid a woman to copulate with a snake; and someone who routinely short-changed, emotionally and financially, the people who were closest to him.While Gleason's public image was that of a comic genius who liked the good life and indulged in it, in Mr. Henry's telling Gleason never gave credit and in fact showed disdain to the real creators of much of his work -- including his signature character, Ralph Kramden of "The Honeymooners."
NEWS
June 6, 1997
An article in yesterday's edition of The Sun in Anne Arundel incorrectly stated the plot of "Rumors," the Neil Simon play in production at Colonial Players on East Street in Annapolis.In the play, the deputy mayor of New York shoots himself in the ear.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 6/06/97
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 11, 1996
Neil Simon's farce "Rumors" asks the question: What if everyone came to a party and the hosts never showed up? The Spotlighters Theatre is answering that question with a production directed by Robert Bayer and featuring actors Stephen Collins and Conni Kenney.Show times at the Spotlighters, 817 St. Paul St., are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays, through Jan. 29. Tickets are $10. Call (410) 752-1225.
NEWS
February 28, 2004
Susie Brown, the mother of singer James Brown, died Thursday of heart failure in Augusta, Ga., family members said. She was 87. Brown became one of her son's most devoted fans, attending nearly all of his shows in New York. John Randolph, who won a Tony for Neil Simon's "Broadway Bound" and played Roseanne's father in the television show Roseanne and Tom Hanks' grandfather in the film You've Got Mail, died Tuesday, his family said. He was 88. His film career was hobbled in the 1950s because of the anti-communist blacklist, but he played many character roles.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | April 4, 1991
* ''Defending Your Life'' A comedy starring Albert Brooks as an ad man who dies and must defend his life on Earth before he can move to the next heavenly level. Meryl Streep co-stars.* ''The Marrying Man'' A comedy in which Alec Baldwin is a rich man who marries a cabaret singer, played by Kim Basinger. Neil Simon did the script.* ''1900'' Restored version of the 1975 Bernardo Bertolucci epic that covers 70 years in the history of the Italian north. Robert De Niro, Gerard Depardieu, Burt Lancaster and Donald Sutherland are in the cast of the film, which was four hours long and is now five hours and 10 minutes.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | April 12, 2007
Molly Ringwald's Sweet Charity is definitely sweet. She's also cute and spunky and innocent. But though the actress -- still best known for the John Hughes' teen movies Sixteen Candles, The Breakfast Club and Pretty in Pink -- plays a dance hall hostess, she's not one of the slickest dancers in the touring production at the Hippodrome Theatre. Neil Simon's script does give Ringwald an out. "Who dances? We defend ourselves to music," one of Charity's co-workers explains to a newcomer. "Innocent" might also sound like a stretch for the taxi dancers at the sleazy Fandango Ballroom.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.