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BUSINESS
By Will Morton and Will Morton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 28, 2005
Most neighborhoods with strong or improving reputations have at least one thing in common: a vibrant neighborhood association or community group. These groups often help stabilize neighborhoods that were teetering, experts say, preventing further slides and turning around a community's outlook. Through beautification efforts, public safety groups, newsletters and festivals, associations often help boost neighborhood pride and exposure among homebuyers and others. "We're no longer talking about stemming decline," said Cheryl A. Casciani, programs director of the Baltimore Community Foundation, a charity organization.
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
The funeral procession for Matthew Hersl crawled through the tight streets of Southeast Baltimore, moving past the Milan restaurant, the Inner Harbor Travel agency and the Little Italy parking garage. Steve Hersl, Matt's brother, blared his car horn as he inched along. A blue passenger van with a Baltimore Orioles hat resting on the dashboard led the convoy through the 45-year-old city finance supervisor's neighborhood. As the procession passed his home, Steve leaned out his black Hyundai and yelled, "I love you, Matt!"
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 14, 1997
Forty-three Baltimore community leaders were honored yesterday for working to improve the places where they live -- from organizing baseball teams for children to forming food banks for the needy.The 43 received plaques from state Sen. Ralph M. Hughes, a Democrat whose 40th District includes Park Heights, Waverly and Charles Village, in a ceremony at Coppin State College. Hughes hopes to hold the ceremony annually."Senator Hughes believes there are many individuals in Baltimore who have not given up on this city," Hughes' wife, Mary, acting as mistress of ceremonies, wrote in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
There are signs of renewal around Hollins Market, the west-side neighborhood whose fortunes have flowed and ebbed over the past few decades. The old Mencken's Cultured Pearl space on Hollins Street might be getting a new tenant soon. The Cultured Pearl flourished in the early 1990s, the neighborhood's heyday, and finally closed in 1998, after the demise of Gypsy's Cafe, the Market Cafe and the Tell Tale Hearth. In 2008, a Hollins Market booster opened Baltimore Pho in the Cultured Pearl space, in an effort, he said, to bring activity and interest back to the neighborhood.
NEWS
By JOE PALAZZOLO and JOE PALAZZOLO,SUN REPORTER | February 27, 2006
To Jerry O. Pittman, the dilapidated 148-year-old mansion known as "The Mount" offers an opportunity for staff members of his nonprofit group home provider to come together under one roof in an isolated corner of West Baltimore. But Pittman's plans to restore the mansion - fixing its slumping roof and gutting its interior to create office space for about 30 employees - is running into fierce neighborhood opposition. Many residents of the Fairmount community charge that his idea, particularly his proposal to build a community center on an adjacent piece of property, will bring in unwarranted traffic, noise and other unwelcome hazards.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | August 30, 1999
In an attempt to distinguish Loch Raven Village from what residents see as the urban sprawl of Towson, the neighborhood association has put up a series of colorful banners to give the area an identity.On light poles along busy roads, including Putty Hill Avenue, Pleasant Plains Road and Glen Keith Boulevard, hang 34 banners identifying Loch Raven Village -- an unusual, county-funded effort to make the community stand out from the surrounding areas of Towson and Parkville, which residents feel threaten to overshadow it.There's a tendency to see suburban neighborhoods "all as one great sea of homes, and yet they're not," said David Nielsen, member of the Loch Raven Association's board of directors.
NEWS
March 4, 2003
Helen M. McMahon, a volunteer and founder of the Poplar Ridge Neighborhood Association in her former Anne Arundel County community, died of a heart attack Feb. 25 at her home in Merritt Island, Fla. She was 76. Born in Baltimore and raised in Locust Point, Helen Merstof attended city public schools. She worked in the accounting department of the Procter & Gamble plant in Locust Point from 1940 until 1954. A longtime resident of Poplar Ridge, Mrs. McMahon helped establish the neighborhood association during the 1950s.
BUSINESS
By Charles Belfoure and Charles Belfoure,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 26, 2001
"Homeownership is the key to a successful neighborhood," said Charles McDaniel. And that's exactly what was believed by Harry O'Neill Wilson, who 84 years ago founded McDaniel's community, Wilson Park. For blacks in early 20th-century Baltimore, housing opportunities were limited, and homeownership was an impossibility for most. In 1917, Wilson created a development specifically to give black families the chance to own their homes or to have access to decent rental housing. It was the first community in Baltimore to be developed solely for blacks.
NEWS
By David P. Greisman and David P. Greisman,Special to The Sun | June 10, 2007
Opponents of the proposed Carroll County Regional Airport expansion have ramped up their efforts to derail the project in advance of this week's scheduled vote by the county commissioners. One citizens' group sent a letter to the commissioners urging a six-month delay of the decision date, while another met with county officials last week to discuss its concerns. The commissioners are expected to vote Tuesday on one of four options for the airport expansion. "We'll deliberate," said Commissioner Michael D. Zimmer.
NEWS
By JOE MATHEWS and JOE MATHEWS,Sun Staff | April 1, 1999
In the kitchen of his Leo Street rowhouse, Rich Rotosky keeps a picture of the two-story, three-bedroom home he and his son are buying in North Linthicum. His neighbors a block away, Debbie Hindla and Richard Vance, are eyeing a piece of Eastern Shore land where their children, sensitive to the nasty Wagner's Point air, could breathe free.Across the street, Larry Sturgill is readying his rifle for another weekend visit to West Virginia, where he has a contract on a small, $75,000 farm near some of Appalachia's finest hunting.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | November 9, 2012
In the heart of a little Southwest Baltimore neighborhood are signs saying "Welcome to Wellesley Park" and "Sustain us love. " It goes by the name of Gwynns Falls, and its rowhouses sit tucked behind a bunch of businesses, including a paint brush factory, Carroll Awning and A-1 Three Brothers auto repair, which front on busy Frederick Avenue. When I approached them, I saw how tidy Stafford, Sunset and Longwood streets were. I soon learned that the Gwynns Falls enclave had recently won a $5,000 city-sponsored award for the cleanest community in its quadrant of the city.
BUSINESS
Jamie Smith Hopkins | May 1, 2012
Younger members of Gail L. Dener's neighborhood association suggested a neighborhood website in the '90s, but older members didn't see the point. Who needed to go online when you could just go right outside? There was no easy way to set a site up, either. "We tried to get some help in establishing a website for county neighborhoods, but could not connect with anyone who had the expertise," Dener wrote me in an email. Well -- the once-robust association for the Parkville neighborhood since died "with a whimper.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2012
Janset Nahum, a registered nurse and neighborhood activist who was known as the "Unofficial Mayor of Sugarville," died March 9 of lung cancer at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. She was 79. Janset Aranlar was born in Adapazari, near Istanbul, one of three children. After her father died when she was 2, her mother was unable to care for her, and she was put up for adoption. "She was adopted by a wonderful couple who adored and raised her," said her husband of 50 years, Dr. Albert Nahum, a retired internist and former chief of staff at the old Church Home Hospital.
NEWS
December 24, 2011
I read with great amusement the recent article regarding the Federal Hill Neighborhood Association ("One man has control of neighborhood association," Dec. 21). The histrionics, the ridiculous over-the- top accusations, and the childish pettiness, while laughable, are all to common with these so-called "associations," unfortunately. After living in two different neighborhoods in the Baltimore area, and having to deal with similarly idiotic demands by the two "associations," I have had the misfortune to have to deal with, I have come to the conclusion that this sort of infantile behavior is not at all uncommon with the board members of these quasi-legal juntas.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2011
A dispute that began over the Federal Hill Neighborhood Association's handling of Baltimore Grand Prix funds has escalated, with the volunteer neighborhood leaders attempting to oust one another from power, consulting lawyers and accusing each other of libel in widely circulated emails. Only one member of the board - Ryan Hada, the association president - remains after three others were removed by ballot Tuesday night, as an outside parliamentarian guided planned motions through the voting process.
SPORTS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2011
The Baltimore Grand Prix's turmoil has spread to the Federal Hill Neighborhood Association, with residents demanding the resignation of several board members over their handling of race funds. At issue is a struggle over $10,000 in community impact funds that financially beleaguered Baltimore Racing Development Inc. gave to the neighborhood association as compensation for inconveniences the race caused the neighborhood. Several board members, including past president Paul Robinson, have proposed giving the funds back to Grand Prix organizers as they struggle to pay millions back to lenders and vendors, or freezing the funds until the racing company has paid back its $1.5 million-plus bill to the city - a move fiercely opposed by new association President Ryan Hada.
NEWS
By From staff reports | January 4, 2000
In Baltimore County Authorities await extradition of suspect from North Carolina TOWSON -- County police are awaiting an extradition hearing in North Carolina for Cornell Holmes, 20, a suspect in the shooting Dec. 17 of a man on Winters Lane. Holmes, of the 300 block of Suter Road, was arrested Wednesday night in Concord, N.C., after Baltimore County authorities received a tip from an informant. Holmes is being held in lieu of $500,000 bail. Holmes is charged with attempted murder, first-degree assault and reckless endangerment, police said.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1996
Catonsville area residents vow to fight for restrictions against wedging more homes in their established neighborhoods, despite the Baltimore County planning board's refusal to recommend reduced zoning densities in the county's southwest."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2011
Each weekday at 7 a.m., seven teenagers gather at St. Stephen and James Church in South Baltimore, grab their tools and head out to clean up the streets. The young men, ages 14 to 19, collect trash on the Sharp-Leadenhall neighborhood's streets and sidewalks, water the flower-filled planters and maintain two public gardens. Betty Bland-Thomas, community association leader and team coordinator, launched the effort to beautify the community and to give the teens summer employment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2011
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge ruled Monday that a Federal Hill magic bar will be allowed to keep its live entertainment license, despite objections from the 300-member neighborhood association. The Federal Hill Neighborhood Association challenged Illusions Magic Bar & Lounge's live entertainment license, which was granted by the city in June, claiming that residents' lives have been disrupted by the noise, parking and crime from Illusions and other nearby bars and clubs. Ken Horsman, who owns Illusions with his son, Spencer, applied for the license last year under the city's new live-entertainment zoning rules in order to host vaudeville-style acts, such as jugglers and comedians, he said.
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