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By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2011
A car accident that left a young woman dead at the All Good music festival in July was caused by the “wanton, reckless, grossly negligent" acts of the organizers, Maryland-based Walther Productions, the woman's father alleges in a recently filed wrongful-death lawsuit. The lawsuit, filed in West Virginia's Northern District Court, is one of two against the festival, which celebrated its 15 th year in July and is known for its jam band line-ups. Another woman injured as a result of the accident has also filed a separate lawsuit.
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By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
City officials say the insurance program for broken water pipes they've been publicizing likely won't be available for several months, and possibly not until autumn. Baltimore first announced the insurance - which officials call a service contract - last year in connection with the approval of a system-wide overhaul of water meters, warning residents they would want to buy the insurance in case pipes break during the work. Kurt Kocher, a spokesman for Baltimore Department of Public Works, said recently there is a very small chance pipes could break during the overhaul of about 400,000 water meters in Baltimore City and Baltimore County.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2011
A third person involved in a car accident at this year's All Good Music Festival has sued the organizers, Maryland-based Walther Productions. The jam band festival, which takes place in July in West Virginia, was accused of negligence in a pair of lawsuits filed earlier this month by two other victims, a young woman who was injured and the father of a young woman who died as a result of the car accident. In an interview last week, an attorney for the organizers defended the festival's safety record.
NEWS
March 12, 2014
Maryland's litigation-based system for compensating families whose children suffered from birth-related neurological industries doesn't work well for anyone. It isn't great for the families, who only get the financial assistance they need if they can convince a jury that health care providers were negligent - and only then after years of litigation and expensive attorney's fees. Doctors and hospitals are faced with the risk of skyrocketing malpractice premiums as a result of jury awards that have recently run into the tens of millions of dollars.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2004
A woman treated last year at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center filed a malpractice claim against the hospital yesterday, saying an intern had "negligently" cut an artery in her neck while trying to establish intravenous access. According to the lawsuit, Dezirea M. Claxton of Baltimore visited Bayview's emergency department Nov. 5 and was admitted for further tests and treatment. Several days later, two physicians examined the 49-year-old in her room and said they had to place a catheter in a vein in her neck because they couldn't use those in her arms.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | October 14, 1994
The mother of a Prince George's County man who was killed in a Wayson's Corner car wreck in July filed a $6 million suit yesterday in Anne Arundel Circuit Court alleging that the drivers of both vehicles were negligent.Darryl Coates, 34, of the 6600 block of Ronald Road in Capitol Heights was one of three people killed when a tractor-trailer crashed into the side of the Dodge Shadow in which he was riding. The accident occurred at 10:22 p.m. July 20 on Route 408 near Sands Road.Police said the car had just pulled into the intersection when it collided with a truck hauling compacted trash.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1996
The husband of a Severna Park woman who died of heart failure last year filed a $25 million suit yesterday in Anne Arundel Circuit Court, alleging that his wife's doctor was negligent.Deborah Magnum, 39, died March 23. The suit says she was a long-time patient of Dr. Christopher deBorja, who treated her last year for diabetes, high blood pressure, shortness of breath, obesity and fatigue.An electrocardiogram March 8 showed damage to Mrs. Magnum's heart, the suit filed by Charles Magnum Jr. of the 300 block of Magothy Road says.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | March 4, 1992
A Carroll Circuit Court jury could not decide whether a Westminster doctor was negligent and contributed to the death of a Manchester woman.The jury of seven men and five women deliberated for almost two days before reaching verdicts in the $2.5 million lawsuit filed in 1989 by George Simpers against John S. Harshey of Anchor Street, Randallstown neurologist Solomon D. Robbins and Baltimore neurosurgeon Fred N. Sugar.The jury -- which came back late Monday afternoon -- could not reach a decision on Harshey.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 13, 2003
WASHINGTON - The accident that flooded the Quecreek mine in Pennsylvania last summer, riveting the nation to a rescue mission that saved nine miners, could have been avoided if the mining companies had realized they were using out-of-date maps, federal safety investigators said yesterday. Two mining companies and a surveying company were negligent for relying on an inaccurate map of an adjacent, flooded mine that had been abandoned 30 years earlier, according to the report issued by the investigators from the Department of Labor.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1999
After her son died last August in an accidental shooting in a White Marsh-area town home, Carole Price and her family moved to Carroll County, retreating from the daily reminders of tragedy.Yesterday, with television cameras and reporters following her every move, Price brought that summer day back into focus for legislators in Annapolis. With a photograph of 13-year-old John pinned to her lapel, a nervous, soft-spoken Price urged a Senate committee to pass a bill targeting adults whose negligence leads to the death of a child.
NEWS
October 8, 2013
Anne Arundel County police say a 20-year-old Severn woman has been charged with negligent manslaughter by motor vehicle after cell phone records indicate she was using her cell phone when the car she was driving struck a motorcycle, killing the driver. Jonathan Wesley Roberts, 30, of Virginia, died in the accident, which occurred in March 10 in Gambrills. Police said Elizabeth Haley Meyers, was attempting to cross northbound Route 3 when the 2008 Chevrolet Cobalt she was driving traveled into the path of a 2007 Suzuki motorcycle, driven by Roberts in the left lane.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2013
The Court of Appeals on Tuesday upheld Maryland's long-standing but unusual way of handling negligence cases, which bars plaintiffs who are found to be even 1 percent at fault from winning payouts. Judge John C. Eldridge, writing for the 5-2 majority, said the question whether to change to another model is one for the state legislature. Another model would likely require juries to assign blame and portion out damages accordingly — something Maryland jurors don't do now. "For this Court to change the common law … in the face of the General Assembly's repeated refusal to do so, would be totally inconsistent with the Court's long-standing jurisprudence," Eldridge wrote.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2013
An Essex truck driver faces hundreds of dollars in fines but no jail time after a Baltimore County police investigation found him at fault in the Rosedale train derailment that caused a fire and chemical explosion and injured several people last month. County police determined that the crash involving a trash truck and a CSX train was caused by "driver error" and cited John Jacob Alban Jr., 50, of the 1400 block of Sussex Road for offenses including negligent driving, which carries a $280 fine.
NEWS
December 29, 2012
Commentator Jim Pettit recently called on the IRS to continue to publish data on people's migration between states as revealed by tax their returns ("Tax data Md. needs - and almost lost," Dec. 19). Government agencies actually produce a wealth of useful statistical data, and we are certain to lose some of it as we continue to cut budgets to reduce the federal deficit. The tax data on migration is useful and interesting, and I would be happy to see the IRS continue to produce and publish it. One should know, however, that the data does not suggest tax rates are an important motivator for people to move from Maryland to Virginia.
NEWS
November 26, 2012
For years we've been told that speed cameras have always been about safety and not revenue enhancement. Again we have been lied to by our politicians, and the proof is that inaccurate cameras are allowed to continue issuing $40 tickets ("Not so fast," Nov. 20). Isn't it about time that responsible parties actually are held responsible? The bureaucrat who allowed this to continue should be fired and forced to pay for the wrongly issued tickets. Leonard Magsamen, Nottingham
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORTS | November 20, 2012
A Harford County jury has determined the State of Maryland and several of its principal transportation agencies were not negligent in connection with a 2001 accident on the Thomas J. Hatem Memorial Bridge that killed two Harford County residents. The jury of six women, who heard a lawsuit brought by the father of one of the victims, 12-year-old Ashley Tollenger, of Churchville, reached its verdict late Friday afternoon, following a trial in Bel Air before Circuit Court Judge M. Elizabeth Bowen that began Nov. 7. Garrett Tollenger, Ashley's father, sued the state, the Maryland Department of Transportation and the Maryland Transportation Authority, claiming their failure to repair defects in the bridge's roadway and to construct a crash barrier separating the oncoming lanes of the four-lane bridge contributed to the death of his daughter and her stepfather, Kenneth Connor, 52, of Havre de Grace.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 27, 1998
A Baltimore Circuit Court jury awarded $2.1 million yesterday to the widow and 3-year-old son of a marketing executive who died in 1995 after he was misdiagnosed by a Baltimore cardiologist.Vernon Harris, 48, of Baltimore died Jan. 8, 1995, two days after he arrived at the emergency room of Good Samaritan Hospital complaining of chest pains, said Philip Federico, the family's lawyer.After two weeks of testimony, a jury found that Dr. Joyce Zeno was negligent when she diagnosed Harris as suffering from indigestion, discharging him with instructions to take an over-the-counter stomach medication.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | November 1, 1991
A Davidsonville doctor accused of negligence in the death of a 9-year-old girl faces a new trial because the jury could not reach a unanimous decision yesterday.After nearly 14 hours of what was described as intense deliberations over three days, the seven women and fivemen told a Circuit Court judge there was no way they could agree."We can compromise with the exception of one or two of the jurors," announced Lola M. Patillo, the jury forewoman.Judge Warren B. Duckett Jr. then declared a mistrial.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
Two people were killed on Route 75 in Frederick on Monday afternoon when a tractor trailer loaded with oranges overturned and collided with the pickup truck they were riding in, according to Maryland State Police. Three people were also injured, one of them critically. The deceased victims are identified as Hector N.C. Henriquez, 46, of Gaithersburg, Md., and Jose R. Diaz, 54, of Derwood, Md. Henriquez was the driver of a Ford F-450 truck. Diaz was a passenger in that truck and was sitting in the left rear seat.
NEWS
By Kathy Snyder | October 15, 2012
The personal injury lawyers' bar likes to try to divide the personal injury systems of the 50 United States into two different buckets — contributory negligence and comparative fault — and then make up hypothetical cases to try to portray Maryland's contributory negligence rule as unfair or antiquated. The fact is that in the 50 states, there are 50 different liability systems. The common-sense rule in Maryland is the contributory negligence rule: that if a person contributes to his or her injury, he or she cannot recover damages for that injury.
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