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By JoAnna Daemmrich Thomas W. Waldron and JoAnna Daemmrich Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1998
Gov. Parris N. Glendening, Ellen R. Sauerbrey and their barrage of attack ads have done what not even a ringing phone can -- disrupt Jim Carter's nightly ritual of watching the weather report."
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NEWS
By Arianna Huffington | January 13, 2012
Given that the country is facing huge problems and still digging out from the worst financial crisis since the Depression, some might expect that the seemingly endless debates and breathless saturation of media coverage of it all would converge into a real discussion of our major problems. But only if they haven't been paying attention. Though the country is sorely in need of solutions, and the public hungry for real debate, that's not what was served up in Iowa or New Hampshire -- either by the candidates or the vast pack of media covering their every word.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | October 4, 2000
LANSING, Mich. -- To regain control of the House of Representatives, the Democrats need a pickup of at least six seats, assuming they can hold onto the one here in Michigan's 8th Congressional District, being surrendered by Democratic Rep. Debbie Stabenow, the party's Senate nominee. Although the Democrats have held the seat for eight of the past 10 years, it's no sure thing, in part because demographic changes may be making the district more suburban and Republican. Two experienced and well-respected state legislators, Democratic state Sen. Dianne Byrum and Republican Senate floor leader Mike Rogers, are competing for the open seat, and both -- so far, anyway -- are employing a strategy uncommon in politics these days: civility.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 29, 1998
SHEBOYGAN, Wis. -- For a man who has crusaded for campaign-finance reform, for running on positive themes and for avoiding expensive negative ads, Sen. Russell D. Feingold sure sounds like he's having second thoughts.In a last-minute rush and in fear of losing his seat, Feingold, who refused to take money for negative ads from outside groups, is going negative on the stump. But he sounds almost apologetic for his attacks against Republican Rep. Mark W. Neumann."I realize it puts me in danger that I don't get up and say all these negative things on TV," he sheepishly tells a polite crowd at the Sheboygan Senior Center that just heard him go after Neumann on everything from proposed cuts in Medicare to ending aid for the poor.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer JoAnna Daemmrich contributed to this article | August 30, 1995
With 13 days until the Democratic primary, Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke is stepping up attacks on rival Mary Pat Clarke over not offering "any solutions" to the city's woes, while a burst of late fund-raising swelled the Clarke campaign's treasury by "over $100,000."In a new television commercial that began airing yesterday, the Schmoke campaign charges that Mrs. Clarke "will say almost anything to get your vote" but won't say "what she's done to solve Baltimore's problems."During her 16 years on the City Council, the past eight as council president, the ad says that Mrs. Clarke has "failed to offer any solutions of her own to create jobs, help our schools or fight crime."
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | November 4, 2007
Aberdeen residents may be tired of checking their mailboxes these days. In the month leading up to Tuesday's election, residents have received cartoon caricatures of a politician stringing several City Council candidates as marionettes, a fake petition to remove nonresidents from the city's voter registration, and fliers criticizing a candidate of trying to "steal the election." Hundreds of campaign signs line the streets and several pickup trucks roll through the city with giant signs deriding Mayor S. Fred Simmons.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | October 18, 1996
BOSTON -- Have you noticed a certain rise in attack ads this year? Not a numerical rise, mind you. What you might call a tonal rise. The political voices broadcast in ads across the nation have been ratcheted up as much as an octave. Assaults that used to be launched by baritones now are set off by sopranos.Follow this musical triptik across the sound waves of the political season.You're driving along Route 66 when a narrator warns about a moral crisis: ''The problem isn't in your house. The problem is in the White House, Bill Clinton's White House.
NEWS
October 12, 2010
Here's a look at what people are saying about the gubernatorial debate between Gov. Martin O'Malley and former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. held Monday: • The Washington Post's Maryland Politics explains how both campaigns immediately claimed victory after the debate . Such campaign spin is hardly new. Before it was disseminated easily over BlackBerry devices and WiFi, campaign staffers would haul in printers, copiers and before...
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz and Lee S. Weinberg | September 7, 2000
BILL BRADLEY complained after the New Hampshire primary, "Attack, attack, attack, every day; the people are fed up with it." That has become the consensus: the people do not like negativism in political campaigns, so for sheer practicality's sake, candidates should avoid it. The problem is that all negativism in political battles cannot, and should not, be avoided. In fact, the best evidence is that while people may say they don't like it, reasonable, negative campaigning can be effective as well as ethical.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | April 10, 2014
Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler on Thursday launched the first critical broadcast ad of the 2014 Democratic gubernatorial nomination contest, taking the O'Malley-Brown administration to task for the failed launch of the state's health care insurance exchange.  Gansler's 30-second radio spot ends a string of positive ads run by his campaign and that of Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown. A third candidate with less money, Del. Heather R. Mizeur of Montgomery County, has yet to go on the air. The Gansler ad does not mention Brown by name but repeats press coverage labeling the exchange's launch a "debacle" and "one of the worst-performing in the country" -- points the administration does not dispute.
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