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By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | November 4, 2007
Aberdeen residents may be tired of checking their mailboxes these days. In the month leading up to Tuesday's election, residents have received cartoon caricatures of a politician stringing several City Council candidates as marionettes, a fake petition to remove nonresidents from the city's voter registration, and fliers criticizing a candidate of trying to "steal the election." Hundreds of campaign signs line the streets and several pickup trucks roll through the city with giant signs deriding Mayor S. Fred Simmons.
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NEWS
October 12, 2010
Here's a look at what people are saying about the gubernatorial debate between Gov. Martin O'Malley and former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. held Monday: • The Washington Post's Maryland Politics explains how both campaigns immediately claimed victory after the debate . Such campaign spin is hardly new. Before it was disseminated easily over BlackBerry devices and WiFi, campaign staffers would haul in printers, copiers and before...
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | October 18, 1996
BOSTON -- Have you noticed a certain rise in attack ads this year? Not a numerical rise, mind you. What you might call a tonal rise. The political voices broadcast in ads across the nation have been ratcheted up as much as an octave. Assaults that used to be launched by baritones now are set off by sopranos.Follow this musical triptik across the sound waves of the political season.You're driving along Route 66 when a narrator warns about a moral crisis: ''The problem isn't in your house. The problem is in the White House, Bill Clinton's White House.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | April 10, 2014
Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler on Thursday launched the first critical broadcast ad of the 2014 Democratic gubernatorial nomination contest, taking the O'Malley-Brown administration to task for the failed launch of the state's health care insurance exchange.  Gansler's 30-second radio spot ends a string of positive ads run by his campaign and that of Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown. A third candidate with less money, Del. Heather R. Mizeur of Montgomery County, has yet to go on the air. The Gansler ad does not mention Brown by name but repeats press coverage labeling the exchange's launch a "debacle" and "one of the worst-performing in the country" -- points the administration does not dispute.
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz and Lee S. Weinberg | September 7, 2000
BILL BRADLEY complained after the New Hampshire primary, "Attack, attack, attack, every day; the people are fed up with it." That has become the consensus: the people do not like negativism in political campaigns, so for sheer practicality's sake, candidates should avoid it. The problem is that all negativism in political battles cannot, and should not, be avoided. In fact, the best evidence is that while people may say they don't like it, reasonable, negative campaigning can be effective as well as ethical.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
Democratic House candidate John Delaney is up with the first negative television advertisement in Maryland's 6th Congressional District, taking to voters a feud with state Sen. Rob Garagiola that to date has mostly played out on the blogosphere. "He's not telling the truth," the ad's narrator says as black and white pictures of Garagiola flash across the screen. "He's hiding that he lobbied for five years, failed to legally disclose nearly $200,000 in lobbying fees, even lobbied to undermine health care reform.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | October 22, 1994
NEW YORK -- Early in the campaign, Gov. Mario Cuomo's managers spent almost $2 million running positive television commercials designed to remind voters of the Democratic incumbent's record.The result was a blip up in his standing in the opinion polls -- "a couple of points," one strategist recalled -- that lasted only a few days before negative commercials being run by Republican George Pataki began to take their usual toll.The inference drawn by the Cuomo campaign was, unsurprisingly, that negatives work better than positives.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
Maryland health care lobbyists have launched a negative radio ad against East Baltimore Democrat Julius Henson, who is challenging State Sen. Nathaniel McFadden in this month's primary election. The ad, paid for by Maryland Citizens' Health Initiative Inc., praises the public health record of McFadden and criticizes Henson, a long-time campaign operative who does not support a plan to increase the tobacco tax. The group wants Maryland lawmakers to raise the tax on each pack of cigarettes from $2 to $3 to disincentivize smoking.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 16, 1990
JACKSONVILLE, N.C. -- When Harvey Gantt strode up for a reception at a local motel here the other day, the cluster of newsmen outside was nearly as large as the group of supporters waiting inside.Reporters are being drawn to North Carolina by the mostirresistible story line of this election year:the possibility that Jesse Helms, the most conservative member of the Senate, an old bull of the Old South who resisted the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, might be retired by Mr. Gantt, a product of the New South, a former two-term mayor of Charlotte who happens to be black.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | November 9, 1994
WASHINGTON -- It is politically foolhardy for a politician to blame the voters for failures in the system, as President Clinton seemed to be doing the other day and as then President Jimmy Carter seemed to be doing with his notorious "malaise speech" 15 years ago. Voters are too accustomed to being courted to welcome straight talk from those seeking their support.But the hard truth is that political campaigns might not be such mindless and negative exercises as the 1994 campaign proved to be if more voters paid more attention and demanded something better from the candidates and their strategists.
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