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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2011
Fall menus are arriving. Bluegrass Tavern executive chef Ray Kumm rolled out his fall menu on Sept. 9. Debuting at Bluegrass -- elk tartare, with violet mustard dressing, marinated corn and fried quail egg. Foie gras is back, with crispy pork belly, nectarines and cherry bourbon pudding. Cockles are on the light fare menu, steamed with four kinds of onions. Rabbit is on the menu, and butter poached sturgeon, but what caught my eye was this entree. Pan seared red drum -- tasso ham tortelli, cockles, chayote, tomato broth.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 21, 2003
WASHINGTON - Apples, peppers, celery and cherries top a list compiled by an environmental research organization of the 12 fruits and vegetables it says are the most contaminated by pesticides. The report from the Environmental Working Group ranks pesticide contamination for 46 fruits and vegetables, based on more than 100,000 lab tests conducted between 1992 and 2001 by the Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration. Additional testing was done on organic produce by the state of California.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | February 20, 1994
The days are finally warming up, and the ice sheets are retreating, but this winter's bitter cold has left behind a fatal legacy in Maryland.Fruit growers say that morning temperatures far below zero in mid-January devastated dormant buds in many peach orchards. Nectarines and plums also suffered.And nursery operators say that a week of stubborn cold last month probably damaged or killed a variety of vulnerable shrubs and recently planted ornamentals.Winter wheat and barley planted last fall also might have suffered, experts say.At Milburn Orchards in Elkton, where it was 13 below zero one morning last month, co-owner Evan Milburn puts the losses to his 120 acres of peaches at 90 percent, leaving just enough to stock his retail stand if the surviving buds bear fruit.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | August 4, 1993
This low-fat dish is a speedy stir-fry that even the kids will love, especially with the presence of noodles. With stir-fry, tiny pieces of food are sauteed in a large pan with very little fat over high heat with continuous tossing and stirring.The secret to even cooking is in the slicing and chopping. Meat and vegetables need to be cut in small and similar shapes.While stir-fry is an efficient, streamlined technique, it's essential to get organized before cooking begins. All the ingredients should be assembled, chopped and laid out to cook next to the stove top. The cooking goes so quickly that you don't have time for in-between prep.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 3, 1996
WASHINGTON -- It is settled ground at the Supreme Court that businesses have a First Amendment right, within limits, to advertise their products. An unusual free-speech case argued before the court yesterday presented the justices with the other side of the advertising coin: whether businesses have a constitutional right to decline to participate in a government-required advertising program intended to bolster the health of an entire industry.Under an agricultural marketing law from the New Deal era, the federal government requires companies that pack and ship a variety of products to contribute to industrywide, generic advertising campaigns that urge consumers, for example, to "buy California peaches."
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | August 26, 1992
The word "casserole" all too often calls to mind the image of dated and tired dish, but that doesn't always have to be the case. Casseroles can be updated to be simple, elegant, fast and tasty enough to satisfy the changing eating habits of the '90's.This very fresh and fast dish can be completed in less than 20 minutes with the use of a food processor and microwave. In fact, the entire meal can be microwaved following some very progressive techniques.Items you should have in your pantry are: fresh garlic, scallions, 4 slices fresh bread, fresh or dried basil, Parmesan cheese (fresh preferred)
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | August 11, 1999
Alexander A. Chasan of Baltimore has been looking for a recipe for chremslech (fruit fritters) for many years. He said his mother used to make it.Anne Tallarico of Laurel sent in this recipe for a fritter batter for fruit.CHREMSLECH OR FRUIT FRITTERSServes 8-102 cups assorted sliced fruits and whole berriessugar to taste plus 1 tablespoon2 eggs, yolks and whites separated2/3 cup cup milk or liquid from sugared fruit1 tablespoon melted butter1 cup sifted all-purpose flour1/4 teaspoon salt1 quart vegetable oil, for fryingconfectioners' sugar, for dustingSprinkle fruit with sugar to taste and allow to sit 1 hour.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | April 30, 2000
Ripe strawberries, fragrant and sweet, are the stuff of dream desserts and drinks. Big reds fresh from the fields need only a quick rinse and they're ready for eating au naturel or dipping into whipped cream. It takes only a little more effort to turn a quart of berries into a kid-pleasing frosty or other treats, such as a sophisticated daiquiri for adults or a spectacular fresh strawberry tart. Strawberry Frosty Makes 3 to 4 cups (about 6 servings) 4 cups sliced fresh strawberries (see note)
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | July 25, 1999
Abundant flavor in a naturally beautiful, aromatic package makes apricots, peaches, nectarines, plums, early apples and pears some of summer's most welcome gifts.For peak appearance, flavor and nutrition, choose fruit that is in season and that has been handled and stored properly.To gauge the softness of an apricot, peach, nectarine or plum without bruising it, cradle the fruit in your palm and close your fingers around it, applying gentle pressure. Ripe fruit will yield slightly.Ripe fruit is highly perishable; purchase relatively small amounts frequently rather than attempting to stock up.In the first recipe, fruit gives natural sweetness to a breakfast or post-workout smoothie.
EXPLORE
September 22, 2012
Watermelons and tomatoes from Deep Run Farms, apples from Baugher's Orchard and potatoes from Wike Farm — all were served up this past week in Carroll County Public Schools as part of the celebration of Maryland Homegrown School Lunch Week. The statewide focus, which ran Sept. 17-21, called upon school systems to feature locally grown produce in their school lunch menus. Signage was created to accompany the products when possible, identifying for students the farms where the food was purchased.
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