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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
A 17-year-old was shot in his neck in Southwest Baltimore on Friday night, according to Baltimore Police. Officers responded to the 3000 block of Arunah Avenue in the city's Franklintown Road neighborhood about 7:29 p.m. and located the teen with the gunshot wound, said Detective Jeremy Silbert, a police spokesman. The teen told officers he was "approached by an unknown suspect who shot him before fleeing the location," police said. The victim was transported to a local hospital with injuries that were not believed to be life threatening, Silbert said.
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SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 1999
The irritation he has felt lately in his neck was showing on the face of Jonathan Ogden . "J.O. wants to go out and compete, but his neck is still bothering him," Ravens right guard Jeff Blackshear said. "Even though he isn't ready to go right now, he's a hard worker who still comes out to practice to work on his technique. He's preparing to play next Thursday, so I'm looking forward to him being there. " The Ravens' bye weekend came at an ideal time for Ogden , the team's 6-foot-8, 335-pound left offensive tackle.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Staff Writer | September 13, 1995
The owner of a 112-acre wooded tract on the Marley Neck Peninsula has appealed a county hearing officer's decision denying her permission to build townhouses and single-family units on the land along Marley Neck Boulevard near Tanyard Cove Road.The property, which abuts a tract used by Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. for a fly ash landfill, is zoned for commercial, industrial and residential uses, including apartments.Jane Pumphrey Nes, the owner, has said she wants to change the zoning entirely to residential use to create a buffer between the Solley community and the landfill.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2011
Archbishop Spalding junior first baseman Nick Freeberger sits on a dugout bench. The evening sun is shining on his boyish face, and he smiles. It has been a good day. He helped his No. 2 Cavaliers to victory with a three-run home run. That would be enough to make most high school baseball players grin, but there is more behind this display of happiness than a single game. To look at him now, no one would suspect that a little more than a month ago, screws were ground into his head for a halo to support a broken neck, and that the chances of his playing baseball this season or perhaps ever were in doubt.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2011
If it were any other player, the news that an Oriole left Ed Smith Stadium to get his stiff neck examined would probably have been greeted with little more than a collective yawn. However, this was Brian Roberts, and questions about his health figure to loom over spring training after he played just 59 games last year because of a herniated disk in his back. "We've probably all had a stiff neck at some point in our life, right?" Roberts said. "I'm not overly concerned. " Roberts had X-rays taken on his neck, and manager Buck Showalter said the second baseman and leadoff man had only muscle spasms, "nothing other than that.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,mike.preston@baltsun.com | October 30, 2009
Ravens cornerback Samari Rolle sits in his home in Florida and wears a neck brace. In 12 years in the NFL, he has never seen so many players at one position with a similar injury. During the past two seasons, starting safeties Ed Reed and Dawan Landry, starting cornerback Fabian Washington and Rolle, who had been expected to play nickel back, have all had major neck injuries. Rolle had surgery a couple of weeks ago and is out for the season. The other three players remain on the roster, but the secondary has struggled in 2009, giving up big plays and missing a lot of tackles.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | February 10, 1995
Cabot Partners Ltd. Partnership yesterday purchased two buildings in the Marley Neck Industrial Park for $12.75 million, in the Boston-based pension fund adviser's second area purchase recently.Cabot acquired the 358,160 square feet of office and industrial space on behalf of the New York State Teachers Retirement System, which expects to receive a more than 10 percent yield from the Anne Arundel County project's $1.3 million annual rental income."Marley Neck fits the profile of what we're looking for," said John F. Malloy, a Cabot Partners senior vice president.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | May 1, 1992
That Baltimore's new $205 million baseball park represents a pain in the neck for some of the spectators is, indeed, a condition requiring serious attention. The time is now.Seats from first base to right field and third base to left field are not pointed toward the infield, so ticket buyers have to turn their heads at a 45-degree angle for the better part of nine innings. Their bodies are located in seats that are comfortable but to observe the pitcher, catcher and batter, they need to rotate their necks to an awkward position.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2012
Orioles left fielder Nolan Reimold will have surgery to remove a bulging disk in his neck and have his spine fused Monday morning. And although he holds out hope he could return by the end of the season, Reimold likely will be out for the rest of the year. "I think it is possible, if everything works out, that's a possible, best-case scenario," Reimold said of returning in 2012. "I am resigned to the fact I need to get the surgery and I need to do my rehab until I feel like I am able to play at this level again.
FEATURES
By Bob Strauss and Bob Strauss,Los Angeles Daily News | April 8, 1992
Those two tag teams of outstanding cinematic athletes -- "White Men Can't Jump's" Wesley Snipes and Woody Harrelson, and "Basic Instinct's" Sharon Stone and Michael Douglas -- were neck and neck in the weekend box-office playoff.In the end, Ron Shelton's basketball comedy nosed Paul Verhoeven's mixed-doubles sex thriller by less than $775,000.Considering both pictures brought in more than $10 million apiece, the difference was negligible and -- at two-week and three-week cumulatives of just less than $30 million and $50 million, respectively -- "Jump" and "Instinct" are both well on their ways to the $100 million winners circle.
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