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By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | June 7, 1998
For the first time in history, a MUC flutters above the U.S. Naval Academy.Not a duck, a MUC -- that's how the Navy refers to the prestigious Meritorious Unit Commendation award President Clinton has bestowed upon an academy considered new and improved at the end of Superintendent Adm. Charles R. Larson's four-year term.The award, which typically goes to Navy ships, air squadrons or command posts, gives the academy the right to fly a MUC pennant from its flagstaff. It also allows naval personnel who served at the academy from August 1996 to June 1998 to wear a MUC ribbon on their uniforms.
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BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | July 29, 1995
A key Senate panel yesterday moved to ensure that Baltimore's only remaining shipyard could continue to bid for Navy ship repair contracts critical to keeping it open.The Appropriations Committee, acting on a $242 billion spending bill for the Defense Department for fiscal year 1996, approved an amendment blocking a new Navy policy that would have ended Baltimore's so-called home port status, thus making Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s BethShip yard ineligible for most Navy work.The policy, issued last month by Navy Secretary John H. Dalton, directed that companies bidding on short-term ship repairs -- those that take less than six months -- could be no farther than 75 miles away from the ship's base.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 2, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Navy Secretary John H. Dalton has asked for the removal of the Navy's top officer, Adm. Frank B. Kelso II, for failing to show proper leadership at a convention of naval aviators in Las Vegas where scores of women were assaulted, Pentagon officials said last night.In a sweeping indictment of senior Navy leadership, Mr. Dalton has also notified Defense Secretary Les Aspin that he will seek disciplinary action against 12 other admirals and Marine generals who attended the 1991 Tailhook Association convention, damaging if not effectively ending their naval careers.
NEWS
By E.A. Torriero and E.A. Torriero,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 9, 2004
GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba - As the United States freed the first detainee since last week's Supreme Court ruling that such individuals have a right to take their cases to court, the Navy secretary arrived here yesterday to oversee a process that could result in the release of dozens more prisoners in coming weeks. Mehdi-Muhammed Ghezali, a 25-year-old Swede, was whisked away under heavy security by a Swedish charter plane in the middle of the night. He was captured in Pakistan in the company of Taliban fighters in 2001 and had been held in secret since January 2002.
NEWS
January 22, 1995
Lord Cowdray, 84, who built Pearson PLC into a diversified conglomerate with major media holdings, died Thursday in London of bronchial pneumonia. He was chairman of Pearson from 1954 to 1977, during which the company acquired The Financial Times and the publishers Penguin, Longman and Viking Press.Edward Hidalgo, 82, a lawyer and career Navy officer who was Navy secretary in the Carter administration, died yesterday of a heart attack in in Fairfax, Va. He lived in McLean, Va., and began his career in 1942 as a lieutenant in the U.S. Naval Reserve.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | April 8, 2007
A former Navy quarterback who was acquitted of rape and now faces expulsion from the Naval Academy took his case to Washington last week, urging members of Congress to support his attempts to graduate and become an officer. Securing the free assistance of several people from lobbying giant Cassidy & Associates is the latest step for Lamar S. Owens Jr.'s supporters, a group that includes a growing number of academy alumni with a wide range of influence garnered from prominent careers in the public and private sectors.
FEATURES
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Rarely has the journal of the venerable U.S. Naval Institute, which has served as the forum for Navy and Marine officers since the age of sail, spurred readers to denounce one of its articles as sensational, dangerous and insulting.But anything can happen when the issue is women in combat.So a late summer squall of letters has blown into the Annapolis offices of Proceedings, with about 100 writers weighing in so far on a controversial piece by U.S. Naval Academy ethics professor Paul E. Roush.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 29, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In a belated aftermath to the 1991 Tailhook scandal, Navy Secretary John H. Dalton yesterday denied a Senate-approved promotion to a decorated Persian Gulf war veteran who is now training for a mission to Bosnia.Though he originally sponsored the promotion, Mr. Dalton withdrew it after a Senate committee -- which also initially approved the promotion -- had second thoughts.The committee changed its mind after discovering details of the officer's attendance at the aviators' convention where dozens of women were sexually harassed.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 9, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Navy Secretary John H. Dalton, who led the sea service during more than five years of tumult and change marked by the aftershocks of the Tailhook scandal, widespread cheating at the Naval Academy and greater integration of women into the fleet, announced yesterday that he is resigning at the end of the year."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 7, 1997
In the early 1960s, Midshipman John Dalton of Shreveport, La., hustled from his cramped dorm room to worship at the Naval Academy chapel, where the bones of John Paul Jones rest.Today, Navy Secretary John Dalton often recalls the words of the naval hero, who said a seagoing officer should be a capable mariner and a courteous gentleman with the nicest sense of personal honor. Dalton adds a late-20th century twist: "I'm sure [Jones] would provide the same guidance to female officers as well," he tells audiences.
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