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By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | April 8, 2007
A former Navy quarterback who was acquitted of rape and now faces expulsion from the Naval Academy took his case to Washington last week, urging members of Congress to support his attempts to graduate and become an officer. Securing the free assistance of several people from lobbying giant Cassidy & Associates is the latest step for Lamar S. Owens Jr.'s supporters, a group that includes a growing number of academy alumni with a wide range of influence garnered from prominent careers in the public and private sectors.
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NEWS
January 22, 1995
Lord Cowdray, 84, who built Pearson PLC into a diversified conglomerate with major media holdings, died Thursday in London of bronchial pneumonia. He was chairman of Pearson from 1954 to 1977, during which the company acquired The Financial Times and the publishers Penguin, Longman and Viking Press.Edward Hidalgo, 82, a lawyer and career Navy officer who was Navy secretary in the Carter administration, died yesterday of a heart attack in in Fairfax, Va. He lived in McLean, Va., and began his career in 1942 as a lieutenant in the U.S. Naval Reserve.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 7, 1997
In the early 1960s, Midshipman John Dalton of Shreveport, La., hustled from his cramped dorm room to worship at the Naval Academy chapel, where the bones of John Paul Jones rest.Today, Navy Secretary John Dalton often recalls the words of the naval hero, who said a seagoing officer should be a capable mariner and a courteous gentleman with the nicest sense of personal honor. Dalton adds a late-20th century twist: "I'm sure [Jones] would provide the same guidance to female officers as well," he tells audiences.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 22, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Richard Danzig, the Navy's former No. 2 official and a key figure in resolving the Naval Academy's cheating scandal, has been selected to replace Navy Secretary John H. Dalton, who is retiring, Pentagon sources said yesterday.Defense Secretary William S. Cohen told reporters yesterday that he had forwarded a nominee for the top Navy job to the White House but declined to elaborate. Sources, however, indicated that Danzig was Cohen's choice and that the nomination could be announced soon.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | August 2, 1995
Amid growing political pressure, the U.S. Navy secretary yesterday reversed his recent directive that ended Baltimore's so-called home port status. The reversal made Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s BethShip yard again eligible for most Navy repair work.In a letter to members of Maryland's congressional delegation, Navy Secretary John H. Dalton said that he was reinstating the long-standing home port status for Baltimore and Portland, Ore. The secretary gave no reason for reversing his June 21 decision.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | July 22, 1995
U.S. Navy Secretary John H. Dalton has given a lukewarm response to a request from Maryland's senators that he reverse his recent order that effectively blocks Baltimore's only remaining major shipyard from bidding on critical Navy repair work.But another member of the Maryland delegation, trying to muster some political clout, has asked House Speaker Newt Gingrich to lobby Mr. Dalton on behalf of the Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s BethShip at Sparrows Point."We're a little more optimistic on our side," Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. said yesterday.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | June 7, 1998
For the first time in history, a MUC flutters above the U.S. Naval Academy.Not a duck, a MUC -- that's how the Navy refers to the prestigious Meritorious Unit Commendation award President Clinton has bestowed upon an academy considered new and improved at the end of Superintendent Adm. Charles R. Larson's four-year term.The award, which typically goes to Navy ships, air squadrons or command posts, gives the academy the right to fly a MUC pennant from its flagstaff. It also allows naval personnel who served at the academy from August 1996 to June 1998 to wear a MUC ribbon on their uniforms.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 25, 1999
WASHINGTON -- This month, in the North Atlantic waters and in a speech by the Navy's top official, came the first tones of the death knell for one of the last male preserves: the submarine.About 144 female Navy ROTC midshipmen are spending 48 hours with male sailors on five submarines, a first for Navy women. Space restrictions now prevent them from serving in the so-called Silent Service.Meanwhile, Navy Secretary Richard Danzig created a stir before the Naval Submarine League Symposium when he called submarines a "white male bastion."
NEWS
By Eric Schmitt and Eric Schmitt,New York Times News Service | July 8, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Fearful of angering the public, senior Navy officials tried to alter the language of a report concerning the assault of 26 women at a convention of naval aviators last year, apparently to make the incidents seem less offensive, Pentagon officials say.The office of the naval inspector general prevailed in keeping most of the original wording in the report, but only after contentious debates with superiors, Navy officials said.Its inquiry was one of two by Navy agencies into the events and subsequent cover-up at last year's convention in Las Vegas of the Tailhook Association, a group of active-duty and retired naval aviators.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 11, 1994
WASHINGTON -- On July 7, 1992, Sean C. O'Keefe's first day as Navy secretary, Adm. Frank B. Kelso II, chief of naval operations, walked into his office in the Pentagon and said, "For the good of the naval service, I am prepared to resign."Mr. O'Keefe replied: "For the good of the naval service, I want you to stay. You owe it to the institution to put this behind you."At the center of their blunt exchange was the 1991 Tailhook scandal, a shameful chapter of sexual harassment against Navy women who were made to run a gantlet of pawing males at an aviators' convention in a Las Vegas hotel.
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