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Navy Secretary

NEWS
January 22, 1995
Lord Cowdray, 84, who built Pearson PLC into a diversified conglomerate with major media holdings, died Thursday in London of bronchial pneumonia. He was chairman of Pearson from 1954 to 1977, during which the company acquired The Financial Times and the publishers Penguin, Longman and Viking Press.Edward Hidalgo, 82, a lawyer and career Navy officer who was Navy secretary in the Carter administration, died yesterday of a heart attack in in Fairfax, Va. He lived in McLean, Va., and began his career in 1942 as a lieutenant in the U.S. Naval Reserve.
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NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | April 8, 2007
A former Navy quarterback who was acquitted of rape and now faces expulsion from the Naval Academy took his case to Washington last week, urging members of Congress to support his attempts to graduate and become an officer. Securing the free assistance of several people from lobbying giant Cassidy & Associates is the latest step for Lamar S. Owens Jr.'s supporters, a group that includes a growing number of academy alumni with a wide range of influence garnered from prominent careers in the public and private sectors.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | August 3, 1998
When Chris McCoy graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy 10 weeks ago, he closed the book on a year of highs (his record-setting performances as a quarterback on the football field) and lows (an end-of-the-year mini-scandal over his inappropriate fling with a female freshman).With that chapter behind him, McCoy reports this week to the Naval Academy Prep School in Newport, R.I., to begin paying back his free, four-year Annapolis education.The bill: half a decade in the Navy.But McCoy aspires to play football, not war games.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1998
Charles Larson, the recently retired Naval Academy superintendent, yesterday defended his handling of a sexual misconduct case in which three midshipmen faced expulsion but a fourth -- football star Chris McCoy -- did not.Larson said two things are not tolerated at the school: drugs, and sex in the dormitory. He said his decision was consistent with that maxim, and he denied giving a star athlete special treatment -- as the other midshipmen have alleged."I don't give preferential treatment," Larson said, responding to a story in The Sun about the case.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 1, 2000
WASHINGTON - They appeared overnight along the wood-paneled hallways of the Pentagon, like symbols from some ancient civilization. Along the Army's corridor is a picture of a mule kicking a goat, the lines as graceful as a cave painting's. Nearby is a yellow pennant bearing the words "West Point" and a sign, "Army Rules." One floor above, amid the model ships and oil paintings of Navy secretaries, is a single blue and gold pompom, a talisman hanging from the door of Cmdr. Robert Girrier, a 1983 graduate and administrative assistant to Navy Secretary Richard Danzig.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 7, 1997
In the early 1960s, Midshipman John Dalton of Shreveport, La., hustled from his cramped dorm room to worship at the Naval Academy chapel, where the bones of John Paul Jones rest.Today, Navy Secretary John Dalton often recalls the words of the naval hero, who said a seagoing officer should be a capable mariner and a courteous gentleman with the nicest sense of personal honor. Dalton adds a late-20th century twist: "I'm sure [Jones] would provide the same guidance to female officers as well," he tells audiences.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | July 22, 1995
U.S. Navy Secretary John H. Dalton has given a lukewarm response to a request from Maryland's senators that he reverse his recent order that effectively blocks Baltimore's only remaining major shipyard from bidding on critical Navy repair work.But another member of the Maryland delegation, trying to muster some political clout, has asked House Speaker Newt Gingrich to lobby Mr. Dalton on behalf of the Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s BethShip at Sparrows Point."We're a little more optimistic on our side," Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. said yesterday.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 22, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Richard Danzig, the Navy's former No. 2 official and a key figure in resolving the Naval Academy's cheating scandal, has been selected to replace Navy Secretary John H. Dalton, who is retiring, Pentagon sources said yesterday.Defense Secretary William S. Cohen told reporters yesterday that he had forwarded a nominee for the top Navy job to the White House but declined to elaborate. Sources, however, indicated that Danzig was Cohen's choice and that the nomination could be announced soon.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | August 2, 1995
Amid growing political pressure, the U.S. Navy secretary yesterday reversed his recent directive that ended Baltimore's so-called home port status. The reversal made Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s BethShip yard again eligible for most Navy repair work.In a letter to members of Maryland's congressional delegation, Navy Secretary John H. Dalton said that he was reinstating the long-standing home port status for Baltimore and Portland, Ore. The secretary gave no reason for reversing his June 21 decision.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | June 7, 1998
For the first time in history, a MUC flutters above the U.S. Naval Academy.Not a duck, a MUC -- that's how the Navy refers to the prestigious Meritorious Unit Commendation award President Clinton has bestowed upon an academy considered new and improved at the end of Superintendent Adm. Charles R. Larson's four-year term.The award, which typically goes to Navy ships, air squadrons or command posts, gives the academy the right to fly a MUC pennant from its flagstaff. It also allows naval personnel who served at the academy from August 1996 to June 1998 to wear a MUC ribbon on their uniforms.
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