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By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | April 8, 2007
A former Navy quarterback who was acquitted of rape and now faces expulsion from the Naval Academy took his case to Washington last week, urging members of Congress to support his attempts to graduate and become an officer. Securing the free assistance of several people from lobbying giant Cassidy & Associates is the latest step for Lamar S. Owens Jr.'s supporters, a group that includes a growing number of academy alumni with a wide range of influence garnered from prominent careers in the public and private sectors.
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NEWS
January 22, 1995
Lord Cowdray, 84, who built Pearson PLC into a diversified conglomerate with major media holdings, died Thursday in London of bronchial pneumonia. He was chairman of Pearson from 1954 to 1977, during which the company acquired The Financial Times and the publishers Penguin, Longman and Viking Press.Edward Hidalgo, 82, a lawyer and career Navy officer who was Navy secretary in the Carter administration, died yesterday of a heart attack in in Fairfax, Va. He lived in McLean, Va., and began his career in 1942 as a lieutenant in the U.S. Naval Reserve.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | August 3, 1998
When Chris McCoy graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy 10 weeks ago, he closed the book on a year of highs (his record-setting performances as a quarterback on the football field) and lows (an end-of-the-year mini-scandal over his inappropriate fling with a female freshman).With that chapter behind him, McCoy reports this week to the Naval Academy Prep School in Newport, R.I., to begin paying back his free, four-year Annapolis education.The bill: half a decade in the Navy.But McCoy aspires to play football, not war games.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 9, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Navy Secretary John H. Dalton, who led the sea service during more than five years of tumult and change marked by the aftershocks of the Tailhook scandal, widespread cheating at the Naval Academy and greater integration of women into the fleet, announced yesterday that he is resigning at the end of the year."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 29, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In a belated aftermath to the 1991 Tailhook scandal, Navy Secretary John H. Dalton yesterday denied a Senate-approved promotion to a decorated Persian Gulf war veteran who is now training for a mission to Bosnia.Though he originally sponsored the promotion, Mr. Dalton withdrew it after a Senate committee -- which also initially approved the promotion -- had second thoughts.The committee changed its mind after discovering details of the officer's attendance at the aviators' convention where dozens of women were sexually harassed.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 7, 1997
In the early 1960s, Midshipman John Dalton of Shreveport, La., hustled from his cramped dorm room to worship at the Naval Academy chapel, where the bones of John Paul Jones rest.Today, Navy Secretary John Dalton often recalls the words of the naval hero, who said a seagoing officer should be a capable mariner and a courteous gentleman with the nicest sense of personal honor. Dalton adds a late-20th century twist: "I'm sure [Jones] would provide the same guidance to female officers as well," he tells audiences.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | August 2, 1995
Amid growing political pressure, the U.S. Navy secretary yesterday reversed his recent directive that ended Baltimore's so-called home port status. The reversal made Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s BethShip yard again eligible for most Navy repair work.In a letter to members of Maryland's congressional delegation, Navy Secretary John H. Dalton said that he was reinstating the long-standing home port status for Baltimore and Portland, Ore. The secretary gave no reason for reversing his June 21 decision.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 22, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Richard Danzig, the Navy's former No. 2 official and a key figure in resolving the Naval Academy's cheating scandal, has been selected to replace Navy Secretary John H. Dalton, who is retiring, Pentagon sources said yesterday.Defense Secretary William S. Cohen told reporters yesterday that he had forwarded a nominee for the top Navy job to the White House but declined to elaborate. Sources, however, indicated that Danzig was Cohen's choice and that the nomination could be announced soon.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | July 22, 1995
U.S. Navy Secretary John H. Dalton has given a lukewarm response to a request from Maryland's senators that he reverse his recent order that effectively blocks Baltimore's only remaining major shipyard from bidding on critical Navy repair work.But another member of the Maryland delegation, trying to muster some political clout, has asked House Speaker Newt Gingrich to lobby Mr. Dalton on behalf of the Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s BethShip at Sparrows Point."We're a little more optimistic on our side," Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. said yesterday.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 25, 1999
WASHINGTON -- This month, in the North Atlantic waters and in a speech by the Navy's top official, came the first tones of the death knell for one of the last male preserves: the submarine.About 144 female Navy ROTC midshipmen are spending 48 hours with male sailors on five submarines, a first for Navy women. Space restrictions now prevent them from serving in the so-called Silent Service.Meanwhile, Navy Secretary Richard Danzig created a stir before the Naval Submarine League Symposium when he called submarines a "white male bastion."
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