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SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Navy football player Will McKamey died Tuesday night at Maryland Shock Trauma, three days after collapsing during a practice in Annapolis. McKamey, 19, never regained consciousness after undergoing surgery to relieve bleeding and swelling in his brain. "We are all so very heartbroken by the death of Midshipman Will McKamey," Naval Academy Superintendent Mike Miller said in a statement. "This is devastating news for his family, his classmates, his teammates and the entire Naval Academy family.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
The brain injury Navy slotback Will McKamey suffered Saturday in Annapolis came during a noncontact practice drill, his parents wrote in an email distributed by an athletic department spokesman at the academy Monday. McKamey, a 5-foot-9, 170-pound freshman from Knoxville, Tenn., was airlifted from the practice field to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he underwent surgery and, as of Monday, remained in critical condition in a coma. The first padded drills of spring practice typically do not include any contact, and McKamey "did not sustain a bad hit or unusual or extreme contact in practice," his parents wrote.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2014
Navy football player Will McKamey remained in critical condition late Sunday at Maryland Shock Trauma, one day after he sustained a brain injury during a spring practice in Annapolis, according to a hospital spokeswoman. Kara McKamey posted on Facebook Saturday that her son was in a coma, and on Sunday, the family — through the Naval Academy — released a statement saying it has received "only small responses" from the 19-year-old. McKamey, a 5-9, 170-pound rising sophomore slotback from Knoxville, Tenn.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
Naval Academy midshipmen get a free education courtesy of American taxpayers in exchange for serving five years in the military after graduation. But when students leave the academy — voluntarily or not — they often have to repay Uncle Sam for the cost of their education. Two midshipmen are in the process of "disenrolling" from the academy as part of the fallout of a high-profile sexual assault case. But neither is likely to be hit with a tuition bill because the incident that led to their departure occurred before they agreed to serve in the military.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 21, 2014
I never thought I could feel such gratitude toward a posse of motorcycle riders as I did the day Brendan Looney was buried beside his best friend, Travis Manion, in Arlington National Cemetery. They screened the grieving families of the two Naval Academy graduates from the hateful placards carried by the members of the Westboro Baptist Church who celebrated the deaths of those young men as evidence of God's retribution on our sinful nation. And riders revved their engines so the families could not hear the chants.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
WASHINGTON - Closing arguments are expected Thursday in the court-martial of a Naval Academy football player accused of sexually assaulting a fellow midshipman, after testimony Wednesday during which the alleged victim acknowledged initially withholding information from investigators and asking the defendant to lie. Midshipman Joshua Tate, a junior from Nashville, Tenn., is charged with aggravated sexual assault and three counts of making a...
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2014
WASHINGTON — The alleged victim in the Naval Academy sexual assault case testified Tuesday that she drank heavily before and during an April 2012 party and didn't remember having sex with any fellow midshipmen. The woman, now a senior at the academy, testified on the opening day of the court-martial of Midshipman Joshua Tate, who is accused of aggravated sexual assault and making false statements to investigators. The case is being heard by a military judge at the Washington Navy Yard.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
Opening statements in the case of a Naval Academy midshipman charged with sexually assaulting a classmate were delayed by Monday's snowstorm. The federal government closed in the Washington area on Monday, including the Washington Navy Yard where the court-martial is taking place. Midshipman Joshua Tate of Nashville is charged with aggravated sexual assault and making false statements. On Friday, he chose to be tried by a judge rather than a jury of Navy and Marine Corps officers.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
Jury selection is scheduled to begin Friday in a court-martial for a Naval Academy midshipman charged with sexually assaulting a classmate. Midshipman Joshua Tate is charged with aggravated sexual assault and making false official statements. The jury - called a "panel" in the military justice system - will be comprised of Navy and Marine Corps officers who are stationed in the Washington, D.C. region. The judge in the case, Marine Col. Daniel Daugherty, ordered that the pool of potential panel members be drawn from outside of the academy, as would normally be the case, because of the intense focus on the case and the issue of sexual assault in the military.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
A Naval Academy midshipman accused of sexually assaulting a classmate at an off-campus party asked a judge Friday to decide his fate instead of a jury in the trial that's being watched at the Annapolis institution and across the country as a bellwether of how the military handles such cases. Midshipman Joshua Tate is charged with aggravated sexual assault and making false statements to investigators in a court-martial beginning Monday at the Washington Navy Yard. Tate was to face a jury made up of Navy and Marine Corps officers stationed in the Washington region but had a "change of heart," according to his civilian attorney, Jason Ehrenberg.
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