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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
The Naval Academy is about molding military leaders, but when it comes to scaling a greased-up, 21-foot-tall obelisk, it takes teamwork. That's what propelled 19-year-old Midshipman Michael Landry to the top of a writhing human pyramid Monday. He topped the academy's Herndon Monument with a midshipman's hat after 2 hours, 19 minutes, and 35 seconds - a feat celebrated by his classmates with jumping, cheering and singing. "Plebes no more! Plebes no more!" members of the Class of 2017 chanted.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
By midmorning Tuesday, Naval Academy Midshipman Kevin Saxton had been awake for eight hours, tackled an obstacle course, survived an endurance run and beat his classmates with pugil sticks. Sweat dripping down his face as he scarfed down trail mix, Saxton said his day at the annual academy Sea Trials was already a success - a sweaty, sandy, muddy good time with his band of classmates in Annapolis. "It's a lot of fun. Pretty physically challenging," said Saxton, a systems engineering major from Grand Rapids, Mich., who aspires to be a Marine Corps pilot.
NEWS
May 9, 2014
In today's world with so much focus on negative news, it was indeed inspiring to read Susan Reimer 's article in The Sun that told the story of members of the Naval Academy who visit aging and dying veterans to thank them for serving our country ( "Naval Academy students give aging veterans a final salute," May 4). To show members of the "greatest generation" that their efforts to preserve our freedom are appreciated shows respect and compassion on the highest level. Heartiest congratulations to all the sailors involved in this effort.
NEWS
May 6, 2014
Who could not be moved after reading your article on the wonderful group of young men and women who have joined in a tribute to those who truly deserve it ("Naval Academy students give aging veterans a final salute," May 3)? We owe a special thanks to midshipman Kimberly Bernardy, who has brought pride to her family and to the academy. Were I an officer in the Marine Corps, I would pull all the strings I could to get this remarkable young woman assigned to my unit. William T. Define, Lutherville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 3, 2014
Richard Harryman was wearing a crisp blue shirt for the occasion, and his hospital bed was in the living room. There were punch and cookies on a table in the hall, and family and friends were waiting when a car arrived carrying four midshipmen. Harryman, 85, served in both the Marine Corps and the Air Force. The midshipmen were there to deliver a final salute to a dying veteran. In a program unique among the service academies, young people from the Naval Academy, on the threshold of their military careers, are visiting veterans at the end of their lives to acknowledge their service as only another member of the military can. "Detail, cover," senior Kimberly Bernardy barked gently, and in unison the mids pulled their hats from beneath their arms and slowly put them in place.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
Anne Arundel County police say they've arrested a Naval Academy midshipman after he allegedly threatened a taxi driver with a butter knife. Police say a cab driver told them he drove two men from a bar in Annapolis to a home on Bay Head Road on the Broadneck Peninsula early Sunday morning. One of the men went into the home to get money for the fare, but returned without enough money, according to police. The two then ran into the house, and one of the men returned with a knife and ran toward the cab driver, who was in the driveway.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
More than 1,000 mourners gathered Wednesday at the U.S. Naval Academy chapel to say goodbye to Midshipman Hans P. Loewen, remembered as an adventurous, vibrant, funny man whose company mates summed him up in a phrase: "Live like a warrior. " Loewen, 20, of Hampstead, N.C., a midshipman third class majoring in oceanography who was planning to graduate in 2016, died March 29, a week after a skateboarding accident at Assateague State Park left him in a coma. He was the third midshipman to die this year - one was killed in an accident and another, an academy football player, collapsed last month on a practice field suffering brain swelling and bleeding; he died three days later.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
The Worcester County Sheriff's Office said Tuesday that alcohol was a factor in a recent skateboarding accident that resulted in the death of a 20-year-old Naval Academy midshipman, but officials said they did not know if the victim himself had been drinking. Hans Loewen, 20, of Hampstead, N.C., died Saturday. He had slipped into a coma following an earlier skateboarding injury. Loewen was camping at Assateague State Park with other midshipmen when he was injured, Naval Academy officials said.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2014
A U.S. Naval Academy midshipman died Saturday after slipping into a coma following a skateboarding injury, the third midshipman to expire due to injury in two months. Hans Loewen, 20, of Hampstead, N.C., was camping at Assateague State Park with other midshipmen when he was injured, Naval Academy officials said. He was taken to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, but he did not wake from his coma. "My wife, Barbara, and I join the Brigade, staff and faculty in mourning the loss of Midshipman Hans Loewen," Naval Academy Superintendent Vice Adm. Michael Miller said in a statement.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
James Joseph O'Donnell, a former Maryland transportation secretary and World War II lieutenant commander, died of respiratory failure Tuesday at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The former Cedarcroft resident was 95. "Jim got things done in a quiet way. He was a big help for me and was a good public servant," said former Gov. Harry R. Hughes, who lives in Denton. "He was very competent and was at all times a real gentleman. " Born in Baltimore and raised on Randall Street in South Baltimore, he attended the Cathedral School and was a 1936 graduate of Loyola High School.
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