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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
The Naval Academy is about molding military leaders, but when it comes to scaling a greased-up, 21-foot-tall obelisk, it takes teamwork. That's what propelled 19-year-old Midshipman Michael Landry to the top of a writhing human pyramid Monday. He topped the academy's Herndon Monument with a midshipman's hat after 2 hours, 19 minutes, and 35 seconds - a feat celebrated by his classmates with jumping, cheering and singing. "Plebes no more! Plebes no more!" members of the Class of 2017 chanted.
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NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2010
Rear Adm. Michael H. Miller, the president's nominee to be the U.S. Naval Academy's next superintendent, flew combat missions into Libya, led aircraft carrier groups to the Persian Gulf and worked four years in the White House before taking his current job as the Navy's chief of legislative affairs. If confirmed by the Senate, Miller will replace Superintendent Jeffrey Fowler, who has led the academy for three years. Fowler will retire, according to the Department of Defense, but he has not announced a date of departure.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Vice Adm. Walter E. "Ted" Carter Jr. will formally relieve Vice Adm. Michael H. Miller as superintendent of the Naval Academy during a change-of-command ceremony scheduled July 23, academy officials said Thursday. Carter, who until this month was head of the Naval War College in Newport, R.I., is a 1981 graduate of the academy and a record-setting naval aviator. The Rhode Island native holds the Navy's record for carrier-assisted landings with 2,016, according to his official biography.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
Naval Academy officials on Monday said a midshipman was found dead in an icy Annapolis creek Sunday after apparently crashing his SUV. Officials believe the midshipman, whose identity was not released, crashed into the creek near Nimitz Library on the academy grounds possibly as early as Friday night or early Saturday morning, officials said. The incident was not discovered until Sunday, when a passer-by noticed a missing part of the post-and-chain fence along the water and reported it to authorities, said Cmdr.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
A Naval Academy graduate was among the two sailors who died Sunday when their helicopter crashed in the Red Sea. Lt. Cmdr. Landon L. Jones, 35, of Lompoc, Calif., graduated from Annapolis with merit in 2001, a spokeswoman said. Jones and Chief Warrant Officer Jonathon S. Gibson, 32, of Aurora, Ore., died when their MH-605 Knighthawk helicopter crashed in the central Red Sea while operating with the guided-missile destroyer U.S.S. William P. Lawrence, officials said. The crash "was not due to any sort of hostile activity," officials said.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2013
A lawyer for a Naval Academy midshipman who is the alleged victim of a sexual assault by two fellow classmates is seeking court documents from the academy's superintendent. Attorney Ryan Guilds is seeking all of the motions in the cases against the classmates who are accused in the alleged asault, as well as the transcript of the eight-day preliminary hearing and the report of a military judge who reviewed the case and made recommendations to the superintendent, Vice Adm. Michael H. Miller.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2010
It started in April 2007 when $95,000 in corporate sponsorship money raised for Navy's appearance in the 2006 Meineke Car Care Bowl football game was placed into a newly created contingency fund. Over the next two years, Naval Academy administrators deposited an additional $200,000 in bowl game sponsorship money into the account, tapping it to pay for "invitation-only" tailgate parties, several catered receptions and $863 in necktie gifts for football coaches. But this off-the-books "slush fund" never should have been created, according to a newly released report from the Office of the Naval Inspector General.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
The wake-up call came at 3:15 a.m. Tuesday, but Midshipman Alberto Salabarria was ready well before then. Anticipating a grueling, thrilling, muddy day of Sea Trials at the Naval Academy, Salabarria and some of his classmates couldn't wait. "Everyone was listening to music, trying to motivate themselves," Salabarria said. Staying upbeat is a key to surviving Sea Trials, a 14-hour test of strength, endurance and will that marks the end of the freshman, or "plebe," year at the Naval Academy.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 3, 2014
Richard Harryman was wearing a crisp blue shirt for the occasion, and his hospital bed was in the living room. There were punch and cookies on a table in the hall, and family and friends were waiting when a car arrived carrying four midshipmen. Harryman, 85, served in both the Marine Corps and the Air Force. The midshipmen were there to deliver a final salute to a dying veteran. In a program unique among the service academies, young people from the Naval Academy, on the threshold of their military careers, are visiting veterans at the end of their lives to acknowledge their service as only another member of the military can. "Detail, cover," senior Kimberly Bernardy barked gently, and in unison the mids pulled their hats from beneath their arms and slowly put them in place.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
Three male midshipmen at the Naval Academy have been charged with raping a female midshipman and giving false official statements, the academy said Wednesday. The case will next go to an Article 32 hearing, a military proceeding comparable to a civilian grand jury, and is still under investigation, said Cmdr. John Schofield, an academy spokesman. He declined to release the names of the accused midshipmen until after the Article 32 hearing. "This case is still in the pre-trial phase, so any further comment on this ongoing investigation would be inappropriate," Schofield wrote in an email.
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