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NEWS
By Daniel de Vise, The Washington Post | February 7, 2012
A year after the U.S. Naval Academy expelled seven midshipmen for using synthetic marijuana on the zero-tolerance Annapolis campus, the "spice" investigation is over, and college officials say the drug problem is past. Sixteen midshipmen were expelled from the academy for use or possession of synthetic marijuana between December 2010 and August 2011, when the formal investigation ended. Only one midshipman has been investigated for spice since, said Cmdr. William Marks, academy spokesman.
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NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2011
The president's speech over, Osama bin Laden confirmed dead, jubilant midshipmen streamed out of their dorms Sunday night and into Tecumseh Court, one of the central gathering spots at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis. Some shirtless, others dressed casually in T-shirts and baseball caps, the crowd grew into the thousands. Some smoked celebratory cigars. After midnight, an officer identified as a brigade commander told the crowd that it was the elite Navy SEALs who had killed the world's most-wanted terrorist, and they erupted in cheers . "We went pretty crazy," said Michael Spinello, a Naval Academy sophomore.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2011
Huddled over laptop computers, four midshipmen spent 20 minutes setting up a wireless network and tested it with what they assumed was a private chat. But Ensign Justin Monroe, a teaching assistant at the Naval Academy, used a small wireless receiver to intercept their conversation. With a click, he projected the messages on the screen at the front of the room for the entire class to see. While their chatter was innocuous - "hello" and "he's in my company, too" - the implications, Monroe warned the class, were anything but. "You're just broadcasting this," he said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2012
The first African-American to graduate from the U.S. Naval Academy has died, according to an announcement from the school Wednesday. Wesley Brown started at the academy in 1945, after the first five black men to attend failed to complete their first year there. He graduated 370th out of nearly 800 graduates in 1949, gaining national media attention, and went on to have a 20-year career in the Navy. Brown, who was in his 80s, was a veteran of World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, and spent time with the Navy working in various other countries.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
The first thing they do to new male students at the Naval Academy is shave their heads. So it is a bit of a shock to see the guys sporting ... mustaches. But the button-downed Brigade of Midshipmen has received permission from the top of the chain of command to grow whatever lip fuzz they can muster during November - which for the last decade has been known as "Movember," an effort to raise awareness and research funds for men's health. It is Midshipman Mustache Month at an institution that forbids facial hair on students, but for the first time in its history is allowing it because of the persistence of a Mid who spent months petitioning his superiors.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2012
When Marine Corps Gen. John R. Allen overheard a platoon of first-year midshipmen at the Naval Academy shout "kill" during training one summer day a decade ago, he ordered the word expunged from their vocabulary. The then-commandant explained that plebe summer, when incoming midshipmen arrive on the yard to acclimatize themselves to academy life and begin preparing for careers as officers in the Navy and Marine Corps, was too early to be thinking about the "kill piece" of military training.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Military prosecutors are seeking to dismiss charges against one of the Naval Academy midshipmen accused of sexually assaulting a female classmate, according to the woman's attorney. Midshipman Eric Graham, a senior from Eight Mile, Ala., is facing a court-martial this month on charges of abusive sexual contact and making a false statement in connection with the alleged assault at an off-campus party in 2012. But prosecutors lost the use of key evidence in pre-trial hearings and will ask the Naval Academy superintendent to drop the case, said Ryan Guilds, a Washington attorney who represents the woman.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Two former Naval Academy football players will stand trial early next year on charges that they sexually assaulted a classmate. Midshipman Eric Graham's court-martial is scheduled for Jan. 27 and Midshipman Joshua Tate's court-martial is scheduled for Feb. 10, according to Naval Academy officials. Graham, a senior at the academy from Eight Mile, Ala., is charged with abusive sexual contact, and Tate, a junior from Nashville, Tenn., is charged with aggravated sexual assault. Both are charged with making false official statements.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
Defense attorneys for three Naval Academy football players accused of sexually assaulting a female midshipman while she was passed out at an Annapolis party last year sought Thursday to raise questions about her credibility and motives. The woman, now a senior at the academy, spent about eight hours on the witness stand Thursday. The preliminary hearing into the alleged incident opened this week at the Washington Navy Yard. She endured seven hours of testimony and cross-examination on Wednesday.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2012
They crawled through muddy trenches. They did sit-ups in the Severn River. They performed a mock evacuation of an injured pilot. And they kept on going. Midshipmen completing their first year at the Naval Academy endured the rigorous 14-hour Sea Trials on Tuesday. The annual training exercise put the approximately 1,000 plebes through 30 challenging events from predawn darkness through late afternoon. "One, two, three, 10," hollered plebes of the 10th Company as they counted squats in the water before flopping backward with a roar.
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