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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
Naval Academy midshipmen get a free education courtesy of American taxpayers in exchange for serving five years in the military after graduation. But when students leave the academy — voluntarily or not — they often have to repay Uncle Sam for the cost of their education. Two midshipmen are in the process of "disenrolling" from the academy as part of the fallout of a high-profile sexual assault case. But neither is likely to be hit with a tuition bill because the incident that led to their departure occurred before they agreed to serve in the military.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Midshipmen at the Naval Academy have filmed a video pledging to fight sexual assault at the academy and in the Navy and Marine Corps. "It's on us — USNA," a 90-second video, was posted Monday on YouTube. It features a succession of midshipmen, male and female, in uniform and Navy athletic gear, standing before different landmarks on the Annapolis campus, looking into the camera and reading lines. "If midshipmen are persons of integrity, and if we stand for that which is right, then we must stand for each other," the script reads, in part.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2013
WASHINGTON -- The days-long hearing into alleged sexual assaults involving Naval Academy football players made no progress Saturday, as the accuser again said she was too exhausted to testify. The officer conducting the hearing ordered her to get some rest and return ready to testify on Sunday morning. Defense attorneys were unwilling to question other witnesses out of order, so Saturday's session - the fifth day of the hearing - ended with no testimony. The Naval Academy's superintendent, Vice Adm. Michael Miller, has ordered the Article 32 hearing to help him determine whether to charge three mishipmen who have been accused of engaging in sexual acts with a drunken classmate at an off-campus party at a house known as the "black pineapple" or the "football house" in April 2012.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Peter John Vogelberger Jr., a retired nuclear engineer and past president of Teledyne Energy Systems who headed the development of devices used in 1970s space exploration, died of undetermined causes Sept. 7 at his Lutherville home. He was 82. Born and raised in Youngstown, Ohio, he was the son of Peter J. Vogelberger Sr. and the former Agnes Snyderwine. A standout high school athlete, he was recruited to the Naval Academy, where he was a member of the Class of 1954 and was an honors graduate.
NEWS
March 10, 2010
The Naval Academy is reporting a record number of applications, both overall and in the number of minorities who have applied. Bruce Latta, the dean of admissions, told the academy's Board of Visitors on Monday that the school received 17,416 applications for the Class of 2014, 2,100 more than last year. A typical class at the academy has about 1,230 students. Minority applications went up to 5,382, nearly 1,000 more than last year, an increase of nearly 23 percent. - Associated Press
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
A civilian employee of the Naval Academy died Friday after falling unconscious on campus, the academy said. The woman, a member of the food service staff, was found unresponsive at about 5 a.m. in the kitchen area of King Hall, the academy said in a release. Another employee administered CPR until paramedics arrived, the academy said. The employee was taken to Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis, where she was pronounced dead. The academy did not release the woman's name or any other details.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
Opening statements in the case of a Naval Academy midshipman charged with sexually assaulting a classmate were delayed by Monday's snowstorm. The federal government closed in the Washington area on Monday, including the Washington Navy Yard where the court-martial is taking place. Midshipman Joshua Tate of Nashville is charged with aggravated sexual assault and making false statements. On Friday, he chose to be tried by a judge rather than a jury of Navy and Marine Corps officers.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2012
As it turns out, the Naval Academy is awash in "Gangnam Style. " A crew of mids from the 22nd Company, at least, seem to have it in spades and shows it off in a video that's going viral. The video (see above), just posted Sunday on YouTube, already has more than 267,000 views. In it, the young men, mainly in dress whites, dance around the Naval Academy to the song "Gangnam Style" by South Korean rapper PSY. It's one of the hottest songs in America right now. The mids call it a "spirit spot.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
An outspoken Naval Academy professor will return to the classroom Wednesday after the academy closed an investigation spurred by complaints from midshipmen. Academy officials declined to provide details of the complaints against English professor Bruce Fleming, saying he should be afforded privacy and a presumption of innocence. "The investigation concluded and determined that Professor Fleming should return to his normal teaching duties," Cmdr. John Schofield, an academy spokesman, said Tuesday.
NEWS
By Talbot Manvel | May 16, 2011
As an adjunct instructor at the U.S. Naval Academy, I take the oath at the beginning of each academic year to support and defend the Constitution of the United States, as I did at the beginning of my naval career at the academy. Yet the Naval Academy is defying the Constitution — specifically the First Amendment. It reads in part: "Congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof. " So how is the academy defying the Constitution?
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
The Navy identified the pilot Monday who went missing last week after a crash over the Pacific Ocean as Lt. Nathan Poloski, a 2009 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy. Poloski, 26, of Lake Arrowhead, Calif., is presumed dead, officials said. "Nathan was an outstanding person, naval officer and aviator," Navy Cmdr. Michael Langbehn, the commanding officer of Poloski's squadron, said in a statement. "My personal thoughts and prayers are for his family, friends and shipmates as they endure this immeasurable loss.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
The operators of the former Naval Academy dairy farm in Gambrills, who sparked debate earlier this year when they announced plans to cut back organic farming practices there, will get to stay on the property another five years, Anne Arundel County officials said Tuesday. Edwin and Marian Fry, who have operated Maryland Sunrise Farm for years, were selected after County Executive Laura Neuman sought proposals to run the farm, which is owned by the Navy and leased to the county government.
NEWS
By H.N. Burdett | August 21, 2014
In 1970, American blood was being shed on the killing fields of Vietnam. Congress lowered the voting age from 21 to 18. Richard Nixon's Oval Office conversations were being recorded. And in Annapolis, a cub reporter was hired by the Evening Capital. He was nearly 30 years old, borderline ancient for a beginning daily newspaper reporter. Unlike other Capital staffers, he was a Naval Academy graduate with a master's degree in journalism, and he was a Vietnam war combat veteran. And he could not type.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
The new superintendent of the Naval Academy said Thursday that the institution is a national leader in confronting sexual assault and sexual harassment among students, and should be helping other schools tackle what he described as a widespread problem. The Naval Academy has drawn national attention for the alleged assault of a female midshipman at a party in Annapolis and the subsequent investigation of three members of the Navy football team. The prosecution came amid a growing public focus on sexual assaults both in the military and on college campuses.
NEWS
Staff Reports, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
The State Highway Administration will begin a project Monday designed to upgrade 80 light poles and fixtures on the Route 450 (King George Street) bridge over Severn River, also known as the Naval Academy Bridge, in Annapolis. Work includes replacing poles and wiring and installing new decorative, energy-efficient LED lighting. The bridge has sidewalks and bike lanes in both directions. Crews will work on one side of the bridge at a time, closing one sidewalk and bicycle lane.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
The Ravens are flying the Owings Mills coop to come to Annapolis, and the capital city is ready to greet them. The Ravens will be at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium Monday for a 7 p.m. practice that's free and open to the public. Events include post-practice player autograph signings for children, activities for younger fans, giveaways, and cheerleader and mascot meet-and-greets. The session also features a youth football clinic on the field before the practice. Gates open at 5:30 p.m. It's the third year the team has made the trek to the state capital, solidifying a relationship between the team and Anne Arundel.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
President Barack Obama will return to Annapolis to give the commencement address at the U.S. Naval Academy this year, the first time he has spoken to a graduating class of midshipmen since 2009, the White House said Monday. The address comes at a time of continued transition for the military, as the administration draws down troop levels in Afghanistan in advance of the 2014 exit and the Pentagon is squeezed by government-wide budget reductions. "It will be an honor and privilege to welcome the 44th president of the United States and Commander-in-Chief back to Annapolis," Naval Academy Superintendent Vice Adm. Michael Miller said in a statement.  The graduating class, he said, "will look to the president for his leadership and wisdom as they get ready for their first assignments.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2014
Adm. Charles R. Larson, the onetime commander-in-chief of military forces in the Pacific who became superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy to restore discipline and morale after his alma mater had been rocked by the largest cheating scandal in its history, died early Saturday at his home in Annapolis. He was 77. Admiral Larson's death was confirmed by his son-in-law, Cmdr. Wesley Huey, a faculty member at the academy. Commander Huey said the four-star admiral had been diagnosed with leukemia two years ago. "Admiral Larson's death is a great loss for the Navy family and the U.S. Naval Academy," said Vice Admiral Walter E. "Ted" Carter Jr., who took over as the academy's superintendent Wednesday.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2014
When your father, two uncles and both grandfathers served as pilots, your career seems destined to take flight. Marine Capt. Katie Higgins not only followed in the footsteps of her family members, but this week she was named to the U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, also known as the Blue Angels. With her first show flight sometime next spring, the 2008 Naval Academy graduate said she could become first woman to perform in Blue Angels history. The Blue Angels are considered one of the most elite outfits in U.S. military aviation, and the addition of a female pilot to its ranks is both historically significant and no small feat, said Robert Thomas, the curator of the National Military History Center in Indiana.
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