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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 4, 2004
Brass players may not always get the last word, but when there's something monumental to say, they're often the ones chosen to say it. Think of the ebullience with which the baroque trumpets announce the coming of the holy spirit in Bach's "Magnificat." Or the horn, trumpet and trombone fanfares that intone the fateful motif that opens Tchaikovsky's 4th Symphony. And how about the "Tuba mirum" of Verdi's Requiem, in which blazing trumpets (perhaps antiphonally placed around the concert hall)
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FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 1, 1996
If it's summertime, the music must be Mozart.Ever since 1966, when New York's Lincoln Center started its Mostly Mozart Festival, the composer's works have become a summer industry, as one orchestra after another has copied the formula.And for good reason: no other composer's music works as well in these languid months.The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra learned that in 1992 when -- because of recording commitments -- it programmed almost nothing except Rachmaninov and Copland. One look at the disastrous box-office receipts and the cry of "Never again!"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
You might suspect some strange jinx, or wonder if the third time's the harm. But the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is taking a rash of high-profile artist cancellations in stride. On July 29 came the news that actor/singer and star of Showtime's "Homeland" Mandy Patinkin had withdrawn from his BSO SuperPops program scheduled for January "due to a schedule conflict. " He would be replaced by "Seinfeld" veteran Jason Alexander. On Sept. 15, three days before the opening night of the season, the orchestra announced that Baltimore's own Hilary Hahn would not be on hand to play Beethoven's Violin Concerto as planned because the popular artist needed "to recover fully from a muscle strain.
NEWS
September 15, 2006
Sundays at Three Concert series features two pi anists and a violinist from the Baltimore Symphony Orches tra and the National Symphony Orchestra's cellist. pg ?G
FEATURES
March 29, 1997
Cellist Mstislav Rostropovich, former conductor of Washington's National Symphony Orchestra, celebrated his 70th birthday in Paris surrounded by world-famous fans including Yehudi Menuhin, Gregory Peck, Elton John and Prince Charles.The pianist Van Cliburn returned to Paris after a 31-year absence, Rostropovich's daughter Elena came with her children to sing a prayer, and actor Peter Ustinov gave a comical tribute.Rostropovich was music director of the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington until retiring in 1994.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2013
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra musicians ratified a new three-year contract Friday that will include the restoration of salary cuts that were made in the wake of the economic downturn. By the 2015-2016 season, annual base salary for tenured musicians will reach $75,024, an 11 percent increase over the base of $67,600 under the previous contract, which expired Sept. 8. Players will also receive a benefit in the form of increased employer contributions to medical insurance plans and pension plans.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | May 10, 2008
David Del Tredici took his first musical trip "down the rabbit hole" in 1968, and didn't emerge fully again for another 27 years, only after composing eight substantial pieces based on Lewis Carroll's enduring classic of inspired nonsense, Alice in Wonderland. It would be hard to find a more "curiouser" case in music history. It's not that Del Tredici didn't produce other things over that time span, or since -- among the 71-year-old composer's recent works is Rip Van Winkle, premiered by the National Symphony Orchestra in 2005.
NEWS
October 12, 2007
Brass concert -- National Symphony Orchestra music director and conductor Leonard Slatkin will make his Annapolis debut at 7:30 p.m. Monday, conducting the Washington Symphonic Brass in its first concert of the group's anniversary season. The performance, presented by the Annapolis Chorale, will take place at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, 801 Chase St., Annapolis. Admission is $33 for adults and $18 for students. 410-280-5640 or www.marylandhall.org.
NEWS
May 24, 1995
Ulysses Kay 78, a prolific classical composer whose works often focused on fellow African-Americans and were performed by top orchestras throughout the United States, died Saturday at his home in Teaneck, N.J.He produced more than 135 works, including five operas, 20 large orchestral works, more than 30 choral compositions and 15 chamber works. Among the orchestras that played his music were The New York Philharmonic, The National Symphony and The Dallas Symphony.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | January 20, 2007
Seeking an escape from the at-long-last cold front? You need head no farther south than Washington, where the National Symphony Orchestra is offering a sizzling concert version of Richard Strauss' Salome. Thursday night's performance at the Kennedy Center easily added up to one of the season's hottest events, and the repeats today and Monday have "don't miss" written all over them. Salome will be repeated at 1:30 p.m. today and 8 p.m. Monday at the Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Virginia and New Hampshire avenues Northwest, Washington.
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