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NEWS
December 29, 2013
It was disappointing to read that President Obama is resisting calls for change at the National Security Agency ("Obama hints at change in NSA phone practice," Dec. 21). Edward Snowden has done this country a great service by revealing many of the illegal activities of the NSA. Instead of the ordering the agency to respect the Bill of Rights, the president fiddles while the Constitution burns. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders wrote in an email that "the NSA today is out of control and we need strong legislation to rein them in. In a free society, the government does not collect data on tens of millions of people, 99.999 percent of whom have nothing to do with terrorism.
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NEWS
December 23, 2013
Regarding your editorial on the National Security Agency, after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, newscaster Tom Brokaw asked "why didn't our intelligence agencies know this might happen?" ( "Holding the NSA to account," Dec. 17.) At the time many people said: "We need to do something. " Well, something was done. And now it's wrong? I don't care if my calls, emails, etc., are looked at or listened to. If, in doing so, the agency is able to see or hear about a plot against us, that is a good thing.
NEWS
December 17, 2013
A federal court ruling this week that the National Security Agency probably violated the Constitution by collecting "metadata" - records that show things like who is calling whom, from where and for how long - on millions of Americans' phone and email correspondence has for the first time put the onus on the Obama administration to show why the agency's massive electronic surveillance program is justified. In effect, the court said the government can't have it both ways - scooping up billions of citizens' private messages without their knowledge or consent while insisting it is respecting their privacy rights.
NEWS
December 9, 2013
I could not help note that while reading "NSA tracks location of phones, documents show" (Dec. 5), there was a nearby ad for a cell phone and other electronic devices. Readers should also know that the National Security Agency provides "intelligence" in coordinating killer drone strikes. Later in the same newspaper, was an excellent perspective on this aerial assassination program - "Drone warfare half-truths. " Faheem Younus wrote, "But for every militant killed by a U.S. drone strike, 50 civilians perish, and the U.S. military suffered over 75 percent of its casualties in Afghanistan only after drone strikes surged in 2008.
NEWS
By David Horsey | November 5, 2013
If we could get NSA hackers to go to work on the Obamacare website, health care for every American would be delivered before Christmas. At least, it seems as if that would be the case. The folks who brought us HealthCare.gov cannot seem to keep the site from freezing up and shunting people seeking insurance coverage to a virtual waiting room with no doors. Meanwhile, the cyberspies at the National Security Agency are apparently smart enough to break into the telephones and electronic communications of every head of state from Berlin to Rio. Why does one set of government techies seem as smart as Q, James Bond's gadgets guy, and another set seem as knuckle-headed as Dwight Schrute on "The Office?"
NEWS
November 2, 2013
"There is nothing that anyone from NSA or Cyber Command has done that is wrong. From where I sit, we're doing everything we can to do this right. We hold ourselves accountable. " It might be time for the National Security Agency director Keith Alexander to come down from the ivory tower where he sits and be put out to pasture ( "Director of NSA defends its methods," Nov. 1). He and his executive staff are in a world or atmosphere that is disconnected from the practical concerns of everyday life.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
In a public appearance in Baltimore on Thursday, National Security Agency director Keith Alexander forcefully defended surveillance methods that have come under scrutiny this year but acknowledged that some of them may need adjustments. Alexander, an Army general, said the NSA is looking for "better ways" to conduct its surveillance, but the agency based at Fort Meade has not been able to come up with such changes to its programs. "These were programs that were developed to defend this country," Alexander said in a talk hosted by the Baltimore Council on Foreign Affairs at the Hyatt Regency Hotel.
NEWS
October 20, 2013
A reader had to be very persistent to find this article “NSA chief, top deputy expected to depart soon” (Oct. 17). It was a mere three sentences, but it was wonderful to discover that Lt. Gen. Keith Alexander was being sent out to pasture.    I can't applaud Edward Snowden enough to thank him for his act of courage in revealing the many ways the National Security Agency has been engaged in...
NEWS
By John Fritze and Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
The deadly shooting at one of the region's largest military facilities Monday reopened the debate about whether officials have done enough to secure the nation's massive portfolio of domestic bases. At least 13 people were killed and several more were wounded, authorities said, when a 34-year-old Texas man and former Navy reservist allegedly opened fire from inside the Washington Navy Yard in one of the most violent such incidents ever on a U.S. military installation. National security analysts say the Pentagon has improved security at its posts following the 2001 terrorist attacks and, more recently, the 2009 shootings at Fort Hood, Texas.
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