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NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | November 11, 1994
Washington. -- Facing mounting pressure to resign, NAACP Chairman William F. Gibson has begun a desperate effort to purge his critics from the NAACP board of directors.In a conference telephone call last weekend with his cronies, Dr. Gibson proposed a plan to oust some 16 of his critics from the 64-member board. He wants to charge them with conduct ''inimical to the best interests of the organization.'' That is, he hopes to oust them for allegedly telling the media about the lavish and possibly illegal use of the meager NAACP funds by himself, fired executive director Benjamin Chavis and members of ''The Tribe'' (the 24 or so board members who protect Dr. Gibson.
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NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | October 29, 1994
One wonders what ousted NAACP Executive Director Benjamin F. Chavis was thinking of when he sued his former employer for some $300,000 remaining on his three-yearcontract.Last week Dr. Chavis dropped all claims against the NAACP and agreed to repay the $76,000 it lent him to make a down payment on his Ellicott City house. The group will also pay $7,400 to cover two mortgage payments on Dr. Chavis' home and extend his medical benefits through April.An NAACP source called it a ''total capitulation.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | September 8, 1994
At a meeting to clear the air after the firing of NAACP Executive Director Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., the Baltimore NAACP branch announced last night that it was postponing its annual Unity Banquet partly because of fallout from the controversy.The meeting also featured a surprise appearance by Martha Rivera Chavis, the wife of the ousted NAACP national leader, who said she had been hurt by "misinformation" about her husband. Mrs. Chavis taped much of the meeting at the Baltimore Urban League's Orchard Street headquarters.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | January 12, 1994
The Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. gave the national NAACP's endorsement yesterday to an effort to license handgun ownership in Maryland.Dr. Chavis, executive director of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, joined Baltimore State's Attorney Stuart O. Simms and city and state NAACP leaders in promoting a rally Monday in Annapolis in favor of the handgun-control legislation."
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | December 26, 1993
W. Gregory Wims is a mild-mannered management consultant with the unusual hobby of taking on high-powered adversaries -- the National Institutes of Health, Hughes Network Systems, GEICO and the Montgomery County government, to name a few.Mr. Wims, 44, pursues his avocation as president of the NAACP's Montgomery County branch, where he is in the middle of a two-year term. By orchestrating a string of news conferences and rallies in recent months, he has heightened the civil rights group's profile.
NEWS
July 8, 1993
After a week of avoidable recrimination, the national NAACP leadership has prudently backed away from its hasty promise to support Charlotte, N.C., in its effort to win one of the National Football League franchises to be awarded this fall.The Baltimore-based national civil rights organization never intended to favor Charlotte over other cities competing for the two expansion franchises, according to the latest words of its new executive director, Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. The NAACP will look with favor on any of the other competitors, such as Baltimore, he says, that sign pledges similar to Charlotte's agreement last week.
NEWS
By James Bock and Jon Morgan and James Bock and Jon Morgan,Staff Writers Staff writers Sandy Banisky and Marina Sarris contributed to this article | July 3, 1993
While Gov. William Donald Schaefer called the NAACP's endorsement of a National Football League franchise for Charlotte, N.C., a "slap in the face," there were hints yesterday that the Baltimore-based civil rights group would modify its stance.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said that the Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., the NAACP's executive director, told him late yesterday that the NAACP did not intend to oppose Baltimore's bid for an NFL team. Dr. Chavis would call Mr. Schaefer to try to ease tensions, the mayor said he was told.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | July 3, 1993
They're all out to get us -- the NFL, the NAACP, probably the NBA and NBC, too. The entire world is gathering in a smoke-filled room to prevent Baltimore from getting a football team.Alas, the conspiracy theory has no merit.They're all just out for themselves.So, sports fans, how do you win an endorsement from the NAACP? Get accused of discrimination, then sign "fair-share" agreements to make everything all better.Of course, now it's not an endorsement. The NAACP backtracked feverishly yesterday, trying to appease the city and state that gave it $1.1 million to help buy its Baltimore headquarters.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and James Bock and Jon Morgan and James Bock,Staff Writers Staff writer David Michael Ettlin contributed to this article | July 2, 1993
The Baltimore-based NAACP, disregarding a hometown bid for a National Football League franchise, endorsed yesterday the rival effort of Charlotte, N.C.The two cities are considered front-running competitors for an NFL franchise, but Charlotte's effort has been rocked by accusations of racism lodged against a company operated by the proposed team owner, Jerry Richardson.Yesterday, however, officials of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People announced they had reached a "fair-share agreement" with Richardson's NFL group and Flagstar Corp.
NEWS
By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Staff Writer | May 12, 1992
Members of the national NAACP will hear arguments next week to help decide whether James Pennington, the controversial president of the Baltimore County branch, should be ousted.The challenge to Mr. Pennington's leadership was initiated by Herbert H. Lindsey, a member of the county branch's executive board, who submitted a 35-page report to the national office in March documenting Mr. Pennington's alleged transgressions.In the report, Mr. Lindsey claims that Mr. Pennington's "dictatorial" leadership is weakening the county chapter, making it a "paper tiger."
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