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BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | November 9, 1992
In nine years, Ralph O. Williams has taken his company from the basement of his house to a plush Rockville office tower, from making money "on the backs of poor people" to a business dedicated to "improving the health of the nation."And he says R.O.W. Sciences Inc. is ready to take the next step -- to become a medium-sized biotechnology company.In a field crowded with Ph.D.s and white men, the distinguished chief executive and chairman stands out as one of the few blacks to head a biotechnology company.
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NEWS
Jean Marbella | October 5, 2013
Mothers trying to feed infants, veterans awaiting disability claims, scientists midway through medical research projects -- these are among the people and the work that have been harmed by the government shutdown. In a research lab in east Baltimore, rats that provide clues into how the brain degenerates with age could themselves grow too old or even die before scientists can complete their experiments. At a homeless shelter, a Baltimore mother feeds her underweight toddler cereal, peanut butter and milk - and worries about nutrition aid running out before the child reaches a healthier size.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2013
Though the federal government shutdown ended last week, the economic impact is likely to be felt in Maryland for months, dimming prospects for a robust holiday shopping season. With Congress funding the government only through Jan. 15 - raising the specter of another shutdown - some federal workers in Maryland plan to limit their holiday spending. Stores are bracing for more frugal customers. And financial experts are urging federal workers to start saving immediately. "To move the economy forward, we need a strong consumer.
NEWS
February 27, 2014
In response to your recent editorial about the health risks associated with pesticides, I offer the following factual information and thoughts ( "Understanding pesticide risks," Feb. 19): It is time to stop spreading a message of fear and instead take a leadership role in educating the public on the safe and effective use of pesticides. The supporters of legislation requiring more stringent monitoring and reporting of pesticide use are scared because they believe that pesticides are dangerous.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1996
You'll find Dr. Randall L. Kincaid, a former National Institutes of Health research chief, in a converted Rockville warehouse toiling away on a scientific frontier called protein expression.The erudite and affable Dr. Kincaid gave up his well-equipped high-tech laboratory at the federal government's National Institutes of Health in Bethesda -- not to mention the prestige and salary of working at the sprawling life sciences hub -- for these stripped-down quarters in an industrial park.Why?
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN REPORTER | December 9, 2006
Scientist made deal with drug firm A senior government scientist originally from Baltimore pleaded guilty yesterday to accepting hundreds of thousands of dollars in undisclosed fees from the same drug manufacturer whose public-private research collaboration he oversaw. As part of his agreement with federal prosecutors, Pearson "Trey" Sunderland III, chief of the geriatric psychiatry branch of the National Institute of Mental Health, which is part of the National Institutes of Health, is expected to receive a sentence of two years' supervised probation and must forfeit $300,000 in illegal proceeds and reimbursements.
NEWS
By Arthur Caplan | September 30, 1992
I GOT the announcement about the conference in the mail last January. I was just about to give the innocuous-looking little brochure the customary three-point heave into the recycling bin when the conference title caught my eye -- "Genetic Factors in Crime: Findings, Uses and Implications."I did a double take. The Institute for Philosophy and Public Policy of the University of Maryland College Park, with the financial support of the National Institutes of Health, was going to hold a three-day conference in the second week of October to discuss whether or not criminal behavior had a biological or genetic source.
NEWS
By Freeman A. Hrabowski III | January 19, 2014
If you Googled something today, you experienced university research in action. In the mid-1990s, Sergey Brin and Larry Page, then doctoral students at Stanford, developed the algorithms that developed into their ubiquitous search engine. Likewise, university research has led to countless innovations that improve our health, protect the environment, strengthen our security and power our economy. Examples range from radar and lasers to synthetic insulin and forensic DNA analysis. Yet, federal support for such research has diminished, also diminishing the breakthroughs that research can produce.
NEWS
By Kathy O. Volk | December 12, 2013
As someone who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2008, I have taken advantage of the incredible research studies at Johns Hopkins Hospital, the University of Maryland Medical Center and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and I'm thankful they're a short drive from my home. I'm concerned about their ability to continue clinical trials amid budget cuts, however. The battles in Washington, as in a real battle, create casualties - among them people with diseases and disabilities hoping for medical breakthroughs.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2013
Dr. Homer Eli Favor, a retired Morgan State University economist who was an original member of the civil rights activist group whose members called themselves the "Goon Squad," died of heart disease Saturday at the Baltimore-Washington Medical Center. A Glen Burnie resident, he had lived in East Baltimore for many years. He was 88. "He was the strongest advocate for human justice you could find anywhere," said the Rev. Alfred C.D. Vaughn, pastor of Sharon Baptist Church. "He was involved in every phase of the civil rights movement and if Homer was your friend, he was a friend for life.
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