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By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Writer | May 13, 1994
To hear her attorneys and other supporters tell it, Dr. Margaret Jensvold had a great triumph and possibly even put a crack in the glass ceiling, that metaphorical barrier said to impede the careers of women and minorities in America.But it is evident her victory in federal court early last month was costly to her. And it was won not without possible damage to the age-old, informal method of teaching known as mentoring."I really think my career as an academic researcher is over," said Dr. Jensvold, who graduated in 1984 from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
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BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1996
You'll find Dr. Randall L. Kincaid, a former National Institutes of Health research chief, in a converted Rockville warehouse toiling away on a scientific frontier called protein expression.The erudite and affable Dr. Kincaid gave up his well-equipped high-tech laboratory at the federal government's National Institutes of Health in Bethesda -- not to mention the prestige and salary of working at the sprawling life sciences hub -- for these stripped-down quarters in an industrial park.Why?
NEWS
By Freeman A. Hrabowski III | January 19, 2014
If you Googled something today, you experienced university research in action. In the mid-1990s, Sergey Brin and Larry Page, then doctoral students at Stanford, developed the algorithms that developed into their ubiquitous search engine. Likewise, university research has led to countless innovations that improve our health, protect the environment, strengthen our security and power our economy. Examples range from radar and lasers to synthetic insulin and forensic DNA analysis. Yet, federal support for such research has diminished, also diminishing the breakthroughs that research can produce.
NEWS
By Arthur Caplan | September 30, 1992
I GOT the announcement about the conference in the mail last January. I was just about to give the innocuous-looking little brochure the customary three-point heave into the recycling bin when the conference title caught my eye -- "Genetic Factors in Crime: Findings, Uses and Implications."I did a double take. The Institute for Philosophy and Public Policy of the University of Maryland College Park, with the financial support of the National Institutes of Health, was going to hold a three-day conference in the second week of October to discuss whether or not criminal behavior had a biological or genetic source.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN REPORTER | December 9, 2006
Scientist made deal with drug firm A senior government scientist originally from Baltimore pleaded guilty yesterday to accepting hundreds of thousands of dollars in undisclosed fees from the same drug manufacturer whose public-private research collaboration he oversaw. As part of his agreement with federal prosecutors, Pearson "Trey" Sunderland III, chief of the geriatric psychiatry branch of the National Institute of Mental Health, which is part of the National Institutes of Health, is expected to receive a sentence of two years' supervised probation and must forfeit $300,000 in illegal proceeds and reimbursements.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2011
While congressional leaders work to push through a deal to raise the government's debt ceiling, some credit unions that serve federal employees aren't taking any chances. Institutions in Maryland and Washington have developed programs to assist their members in the event Congress fails to raise the government's borrowing limit and Uncle Sam can't pay workers' wages or retirees' benefits this month. They are prepared to offer low-rate or interest-free loans and allow borrowers to skip some loan payments to get through the financial crisis.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 25, 2005
WASHINGTON - National Institutes of Health Director Elias A. Zerhouni, meeting with scientists who have railed against sweeping new ethics regulations, defended the rules aimed at halting conflict-of-interest problems. But scientists at yesterday's two-hour meeting said they found the agency director sympathetic to their grievances. "He clearly understood our position and clearly has many of the same concerns," said Cynthia Dunbar, senior investigator of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
The University of Maryland School of Medicine announced this week a $500 million fundraising goal — the Baltimore institution's largest campaign ever. Donors already have given $339 million during the quiet phase of the campaign, dubbed "Transforming Medicine Beyond Imagination. " The money will be used to advance research, fund top-notch training of doctors and devise ways to improve patient care, said Dean E. Albert Reece. Reece said institutions like his need to look more to private donors as government funds fail to keep pace with growth.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2012
As part of a federal project aimed at better treating pain, the University of Maryland, Baltimore will begin revamping the way it teaches future doctors, dentists, nurses and pharmacists. Pain affects approximately 100 million Americans and their treatment and lost productivity are estimated to cost up to $635 billion, according to the National Institutes of Health, which recruited academic centers to help with the problem. A pain consortium of two dozen NIH agencies received 56 proposals and picked 11 universities to be Centers of Excellence in Pain Education.
NEWS
By Pat Farmer | May 12, 2014
A friend of mine who is a federal retiree uses hearing aids. We meet once a month for breakfast at a restaurant, which sometimes can be very noisy, with clanging of pots and dropped dishes. These noises are bothersome to me but when they occur, I can see my friend grimace in pain because of how the noise affects her. The hearing aids magnify the loud noises.  When I received information about a hearing study, I immediately thought of her and decided that there must be many other older adults who experience similar problems with hearing aids and noise.
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