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By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,The Sun's medical reporter | July 14, 1991
Only a few years ago, it would have been unthinkable. Who would have thought that the American Medical Association, Lee Iacocca and the Heritage Foundation -- not a radical tendency among them -- would be joining unions and assorted leftists in calling for an overhaul of America's health-care system?Hardly anyone agrees on the exact prescription. But across industry, academia, organized labor and politics, a rising chorus is warning of calamity if serious medicine isn't found for the growing ranks of Americans who are walking around without health insurance, justifiably afraid that they are just an ambulance ride away from financial ruin.
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NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun Republican health care reform plan Washington Bureau of The SunWashington Bureau of The Sun | November 8, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Jolted by Tuesday's regional elections, when voters around the country registered discontent with the status quo, Republicans and Democrats on Capitol Hill are scurrying to capitalize on the public's displeasure.Just two days after Sen. Harris Wofford, D-Pa., trounced former Bush administration Attorney General Richard L. Thornburgh in Pennsylvania's Senate race, Senate Republicans lined up behind large-scale plan to overhaul the nation's health care system.Similarly, as Democratic power brokers contemplated bruising setbacks in New Jersey, Virginia and Mississippi, House Democratic leaders closed ranks yesterday around a new soak-the-rich plan to cut taxes for middle-income workers.
NEWS
September 10, 2007
Make medical care available for all I agree with Thomas Sowell that people should take responsibility for how they use health care dollars and insurance and for how they care for themselves and use medical facilities, including ERs ("Let's not confuse lack of insurance with lack of care," Opinion * Commentary, Sept. 5). I also see his point that national health insurance would not be free. However, Mr. Sowell notes that in the past he was "lucky enough not to have any heavy duty medical expenses that would have required major operations or a long-term hospital stay."
NEWS
By Jack W.Germond and Jules Witcover | January 22, 1992
Manchester, N. H.-- WHEN Sen. Bob Kerrey launched his candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination, his supporters billed him as the next John F. Kennedy, complete with charisma. He was young, 48, boyish-looking and a Vietnam war hero whose exploits were at least a match for the PT-109 saga.In the following weeks, however, he seemed to turn the charisma spigot on and off, sometimes impressing crowds, more often leaving them lukewarm as he struggled to produce an effective message.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | February 16, 2013
President Barack Obama's approach to so-called "climate change" appears to include recycling old ideas. In his State of the Union address, the president recycled the idea of spending more on education, though we are still getting unsatisfactory results -- a fact he inadvertently acknowledged by saying we're not keeping up with other countries in science and math. He maintained there are tens of thousands of jobs available, but companies can't fill them because public schools aren't teaching students what they need to know.
NEWS
By THEODORE R. MARMOR | July 30, 1995
The Medicare program, budget deficits and maneuvering for the next presidential race have once again come into intense and very public conflict. The partisan fight has left the country bewildered by a mix of crisis talk, fact-throwing and ideological name-calling.In May, President Clinton publicly rejected the suggestion of House Speaker Newt Gingrich that Medicare's forecasted budget be reduced substantially (about $270 billion) to "save" the valued but beleaguered program. The president also has rejected the "remedy" of a bipartisan national commission proposed by Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole, an announced contender for the Republican presidential nomination.
BUSINESS
By LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | November 10, 2004
LOS ANGELES - California Insurance Commissioner John Garamendi, satisfied by millions of dollars in concessions to the state, cleared the way yesterday for health care giants Anthem Inc. and WellPoint Health Networks Inc. to complete their multibillion-dollar merger. Anthem announced plans in October last year to acquire WellPoint in a deal valued at $16.4 billion, but Garamendi's refusal in July to approve the transfer of its Blue Cross Life & Health subsidiary, which has 7 million members in California, stalled the process.
NEWS
By Robin Miller | April 3, 1991
HASSAN, an immigrant from Pakistan, had to quit his job. The problem wasn't discrimination. The convenience store he managed was owned by a fellow Pakistani. It wasn't salary, either. While not great, Hassan's income was adequate to meet his simple needs. The problem was health insurance. Hassan wanted to get married, so he had to find a job that offered health insurance for himself and his new wife.Businesses that can't offer medical benefits have trouble finding and keeping quality employees, especially those with children or non-working spouses.
NEWS
May 14, 2011
David Savage's article "Health care law gets friendly hearing in appeals court" (May 11) was predictably friendly to the court and Obamacare. He asserted that "the issue is whether Congress has the power to regulate the national health insurance market by requiring all those who can afford insurance to pay for coverage. " But for the rest of the article he carefully ignored just that issue. Instead, he described comments by the judges that were "friendly" to Obamacare but neglected to point out the obvious logical fallacy in those comments.
NEWS
October 2, 2013
The first sentence I heard in the first lecture of my first year at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry in 1970 was "in America, health care is a right, not a privilege. " It took another 40 years for a true national health insurance bill to be passed, and to those who oppose it on ideological grounds I say: Deal with it! The toothpaste is out of the tube and the train has pulled out of the station. A more constructive approach than repeatedly trying to terminate the law would be to identify those portions of it that need to be improved and amend it. America needs a healthy population to compete with other advanced countries and to maintain a strong national security.
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